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August 03, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-08-03

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Wednesday, August 3, 1977

TIVUE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, August 3, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Bill would give dsplce
peu cers homemkers tax break

CLI UI

By DENISE FOX it will change
On most nights, the Dental School grounds Another fol
have about as much life in them as an extract- Barb Binim,
ed tooth, but two nights a week they come good dancer it
alive with spirit and movement. "I'm a klut
Members of the Folk Dancing Club kick tp cause it's fu
their heels each Tuesday and Friday night to sport.
the music of different -countries. And once AD NOB
they start stomping, dancing, clapping and .
yelling, there's no stopping them. cers who t
circle, and eni
IN BETWEEN leading various dances and else is going
tending to the music, Alex Stoll, a sophomore Newton Mce
who just started folk dancing last fall, ex- folk dancer si
plained how he became attracted to this type it, even thoug
of dancing. "In the beg
Stoll hardly considered folk dancing worthy "but in the en
of his time until he took a beginning course at weights on yor
the University. Then he was hooked. Folk dancir
'I really enjoy it," Stall said. He said he catse it is no
manages to endure the comments and gazes or be ethnic,"
that he draws from others who haven't yet But Saralee
succumbed to the thrill of folk dancing. tion about be
Recently, sl
"YOU GET FUNNY jocks who give you improvisation,
]oks," he said. "If you get men's liberation, his bottom.
Bullard tours local

fi'
men's o
k anc
claims
n ordert
fz," she
n and
DY SEI
sidly th
d up go
ight.
,Michael,
nce Feb
h it is p
inning I
d you fe
ur legs.'
rng appei
t structu
he said
Goodm
ing "fan
ie said,s
al ande

By BARBARA ZAHS
Widowed or divorced home-
makers will no longer find
themselves burdened by the
pinion of folk dancing. 'tax liability of their former
,tUnierofyfolk ent spouses if Congress approves
e r, University student a hill proposed by Rep. Carl
you don't have to be a Pursell.
to enjoy folk dancing. "It's a tax equity that they
confessed. "I do it be- were deserving," Pursell ex-
it's not a competitive plained.
THE TAX Averaging Equity
EMtIS to mind the beg - Act introduced last week would
o md teliminate the "unjust and dis-
row their feet into the ~ criminatory" aspects of income
ing left when everybody averaging regulations. Widow-
ed or divorced homemakers
who has been an asvid who have taken jobs outside
ruary, said that he loves the home to support themselves
)hysclly emaning. and their families would bent-
'hysicaily demanding. fit most from the Act.
really enjoy it," he said, Current IRS regulations al-
el like you have 51 pound low persons with rapid increases
in income to ease their tax bur-
aled to McMichael be. den by averaging their earn-
ured. "You can be fancy .ings over a five-year period,
thereby paying tax at a lower
. rate.
an adds a note of cau- But displaced homemakers-
Icy." those seeking employment aft-
somebody felt daring and er divorce or death of a spouse
ended ip falling flat on - have not been able to re-
ceive the full benefits of such
averaging because they have
stv'arrgrWressrMrrs tr ~ generally filed joint returns and

iust i'iclide the past income
of their former spouses when-
figuring their tax liability.
UNDER TIE NEW proposal,
however, these persons may-
disregaird their former spouses'
income and compute their tax
based solely on their own earn-
iota.
"It's a tax advantage to the
individual." Pursell said. "I be-
lieve the Tax Averaging Equity
Act will ease then financial bur-
den and erase the tax inequity
mane women - and some men
- now face."
The Ihouse Wavs and Means
committee is now considering
the bill, and Piirsell said he is
"very encouraged" by response
received thus far.
THE BItI WAS developed by
Barbara Markana and other
members of the Ann Arbor -
Washtenaw National Organiza-
tion for Women's (NOW) Task-
force on Displaced Ilomenak-
ers.
"If this bill goes through,
(displaced homemakers) could
save themselves a good amount
of mones on their income tax
returns," she said, adding, "It
would come at a time when
every little hit counts."

housing
By GREGG KRUPA
State Representative Perry
Bullard took a guided tour of
several local housing facilities
yesterday, courtesy of members
of the Michigan Student Assem-
bly (MSA) Housing Law Re-
form Project.
Bullard congratulated Project
members for conducting a
"highly organized tour" and
praised their work in the area
of housing taiw reform.
BUT HE SAID a stronger Atn
Arbor Tenants Union was aisut
nieressars to insure improve-
rent of local housing coni-
tatns.
"Part of the proiblem in
terms of gathering strength is
developing a cohesise organiza.
tion," said Bullard. "And that's
difficult to do with the high mo-
bility characteristig of the
housing market in this city.
People tend to take the Ameri-
can way out and move out of
houses, trying to get a better
place, rather than changing con-
ditions through organizing ac-
tivities and staying and fight-
ing."
Chris Bachelder, MSA Execu-
tive Vice President, said the

facilities
tour was conducted "so Bullard
could have a firsthand look
at housing problems in the city,
some of which are pretty se-
vere. Perry seems to general-
ly support liberal housing leg-
islation that will help the haus-
ing problems along."
MEMBERS OF the Housing
Law Reform Project said the
first building shown to Bullard
was "admittedly an extreme
exaniple." The house on S.
Strite St. sias without electricity
because the landlord had not
paid the hils ind the bath-
roois leaked to the flor be-
Rick Allenr one of the build-
blg's tenant:, sad he spent
mitch of his te trying it- keep
street people from stealing the
firniture.
"There arent aty tacks on
the front doir; anyone can just
walk in. We had to put locks on
the refrigerator to keep the food
from being stolen. My baby
almost fell off the stairs and
hurt himself real bad because
there's no light on the stairs."
IRONICALLY, as tour group
members left the premises,
See BULLARD, Page 10

State Representative Perry Bullard gets a firsthand look at local housing conditions yesterday
as members of the Michigan Student Assembly Housint Law Reform Project lead him on a tour of
several facilities.

Homeless desks
Say there, needy student organizations, wouldn't
a decorative U of M desk look good over in that
corner? Or how about a tasteful (if slightly used)
file cabinet over by the office door? Well, any stu-
dent organization with an office in. the Union is
welcome to easy pickin's from the attractive supply
of desks and cabinets currently residing in the Stu-
dent Service Office hallway and the Union's third
floor lobby. Student Service Office's Tom Easthope
is the man to contact.
Happenings
... secretaries of the world, unite? The Organiz-
ing Committee for Clericals (OCC) will be holding
a meeting at 5:30 p.m. at Lord of Light Lutheran

-TODAY-
Church, 801 S. Forest . . . attend an introductory
lecture on transcendental meditation, sponsored by
the Students International Meditation Society in the
UGLI Multipurpose Room at 7:30 . . . and also at
7:30 the A/V Center will offer Older Children's Films
(we're all older children, right?) including Follow
the North Star, in MLB 3.
He'd rather be rich
than be President
Quick, who makes more money, Billy Carter or
Jimmy Carter? Oddly enough, brother Billy's en-
dorsements and appearances this year will net him
a cool half million, compared to which brother Jim-
my's salary is peanuts. Money magazine, in its
August issue, reported that Billy's estimated $500,000

income will be earned at $5,(00 per public appear-
ante, certified check in the bank. In addition, he will
have part of the take from the Carter peanut farm,
which grosses $5 million annually, and revenues
from his gas station, which is taking in tourist dollars
at the rate of $5,000 a week. "If people are crazy
enough to pay money to hear me speak, I'm crazy
enough to do it," Billy said.
On the outside
A good day for castles in the air (lots of clouds)
but a bad day for castles in the sand (rain). Very
cryptic weather. There will be widely scattered
showers today and tonight, ending by tomorrow
morning. The high today will be 78, the low tonight
60, and the high tomorrow 80.

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