100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 29, 1977 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F .. an , f P.-M-9 IrL r k-Ale L t,? A K I MA 11 V nne gmlon

Friday, July 29, 1977

THE MICrHTGN UR

# e ..

. ./{ r x

The latest delicacy,-dormous

HIGH LANE, England (AP) - Tired of the
same old thing for dinner? Try a dormouse,
at $25 an ounce.
Richard Hunt is selling the two and one-half
inch long critters - electrocuted and care-
fully skinned - as fast as they reach their
six month birthday. Connoisseurs book orders
months in advance for the privilege of paying
$51 for one two-ounce dormouse, which Hunt
says is most tasty when braised in honey and
wine and then lightly fried in butter.
"THE POINT IS," said the 29-year- old
enterprising breeder, "that although there are
a lot of people in this country who are very,
very overtaxed and are finding it very hard
to get by, even in poor old England there are
still a few people who can afford to enjoy the
good life now and then, and that includes
eating dormice on special occasions."
The dormouse, which resembles a tiny
squirrel, was a delicacy enjoyed by the Ro-
mans 2,000 years ago. In 1902 Lord Rothschild
freed some edible dormice in Hertfordshire
and they have been propagating throughout/
the English countryside ever since.
But the tiny nocturnal creatures, who feed
on berries, grasses and nuts, are difficult to
catch "and when they're cornered they can
get you with their -very sharp teeth," Hunt
cautioned.

"THEY ALSO have a ferocious loud growl
which tends to put pursuers off. Thersupply
is so scarce we are willing to pay people 30
pounds apiece ($51) if they will bring them
to us." Hunt said he makes no profit purvey-
ing the dormice. .
He discovered the-gourmet's delight at a
friend's wedding in France in 1971.
"There were loads of courses and one
course I particularly enjoyed," he recalled.
"My dinner partners couldn't speak English
and I couldn't speak French, so when I asked
them what I was eating the fellow did a lot
of scratching on the tablecloth with his hands
and started squeaking. I thought he was say-
ing rabbit. Only later did I find out I'd eaten
a mouse. I probably wouldn't have if I'd
known what it was."
Hunt, whose family operates a slaughter-
house, said he has tried out the rodent on
unsuspecting dinner guests in his own home in
this northern English town. The verdict has
been raves for the mystery meat before din-
ers were told what the appetizer was-after-
wards, guests tended not to believe him.
He began breeding dormice for sale five
years ago, starting with, a stock he obtained
from a London dealer. He sold 22 offspring
to a specialty restaurant last year and kept
eight for himself, and this year he says
he'll be lucky if he has 50 for sale.

Lawyer explains lawsuit
(Continued from Page 1) students.
"If we get a favorable deci- Kaimowitz said he hopes a
sin from the judge, this case preliminary' injunction halting
potentially can have the same the tracking of low-income chil-
impact on socio-economic status dren would be issued by August
in education, that Brown had on 22 The injunction would stop
race in education," said Kaimo- th ackinguilthecild
witz. could be properly tested to de-
Kaimowitz said he had recent- termine whether the academic
ly won a similar case in Detroit. problems result from economic
That case however, involved or educational deprivation.
latino students and Kaimowitz
ias able to show language dif- One furlong is 220 yards. One
ferences played a key role in league is 5,280 yards (three
the academic performance of miles).
« r TUESDAY-SUNDAY AUG. 2-7
*~Once Upon A Time
SPECIALS
TUESDAY AUG, 2
Ladies' Night n
- WEDNESDAY AUG. 3 w
Student Night
r, TrHURSDAY AUG. 4
'" Greek & Dorm Night *
. SUNDAY AUG. 7w,
GET .
' A SOME
« Pitcher & Hospitality v
' MONDAY AUG. 8
Tequila Night
J ,ALSO-A NEW ATTRACTION
* l i l1l S a i'

Bell considers Helms case

(Continued from Page 3) HELMS, 54, headed the C
including former President Ger- from 1966 to 1973. He was U.
ald R. Ford, have said there ambassador to Iran from 19
was no U.S. involvement in the until last year.
September 1973 coup in which Bell said he probably won
Allende died. consult with President Carter
N.Y. uge extends
medicaid abortions
(Continued from Page 3) states other than New Yo
restraining order "would wreak could intervene and enter arg
fiscal harm and havoc-and not ments on Wednesday.
to sign it would create needless
waste and damage. THE HYDE Amendment is
"THE QUESTION is, whether effect only for this year becau
we are still dealing with a sub- it is attached to the appropr
stantial case. And we still are," tions bill. The House and Sen
the judge said. "We have grave have been unable to agree th
issues, and they are so grave to far on the terms of a simi
cause human travail and suf- amendment to next year's
fering that may be needless un- propriations bill.
til we can decide the issues." Califano had said he was p
The plaintiffs-the ACLU, the pared to enforce the Hy
Center for Constitutional Rights, Amendment by notifying st;
and Planned Parenthood Inc. - Medicaid officials that the g
had argued that the Supreme ernment would no longer pay
Court's latest ruling was not abortions unless a doctor c
definitive in this case. They said tified it was necessary to sa
that when the Supreme Court the woman's life.
allowed states to refuse pay- Nearly all abortions finani
ments for medically unneces- by HEW are performed un
sary abortions, it was less re- the Medicaid program. Ab
strictive than the Hyde Amend- 300,000 of the 1.1 million ab
ment, which bars payments ex- tions performed each year
cept when a mother's life is in the United States are paid
danger, by HEWr-a cost estimated
Although the case that prompt- more than $50 million.
ad the ruling began in New York
State. Dooling's actions have -
kept Califano from enforcing
the H y de Amendment any -A P P A R 1
where. The judge ruled yester-
day that abortion providers from
-ter's
thru
C* ass W Ad * N.

IA
.S.
473
uld
at

ark
gu-
in
use
ia-
ate
hus
lar
ap-
re-
de
ate
ov-
for
er-
ave
ced
ader
out
or-
in
for
at

some point because the case
.touches on foreign affairs.
The attorney general also in-
dicated the high level U.S. ef-
forts to get Korean rice dealer
Tongsun Park's testimony in the
Korean influence - buying probe
were directed at South Korea
and not England where Park
now lives.
PARK GAVE campaign con-
tributions to a number of con-
gressmen in the early 1970s,
prior to passage of a law in
1974 barring contributions from
foreigners. The House and Jus-
tice Department are investigat-
ing whether he was trying to
buy influence for the South Ko-
rean government.
. Bell and a deputy told con-
gressmen Wednesday that Park
is a key witness and efforts to
get him back to the United
States or at least to get his tes-
timony were being made at the
highest levels.
At his news conference he
said: "We're operating at the
highest diplomati levels. We're
trying to go thrdu gh the State
Department and the President
is interested in this."
ASKED IF the President had
sought Britain's help, Bell re-
plied, "No, no. The British don't
have anything to do with this."
Asked if that means the dip-
lomatic efforts were being made
with South Korea, Bell said,
"That would be a fair state-
ment."

NG NIGHTLY
JuILYZ8-3I
-I hurs- fri - satPSuet
rTGN DGOWT'7GW YP5\-

10:10AND 10:40 SHOWS $1 .25ALL OTHER.S.$3W
Aa4 A bngdmneagin a
7
® gaxyfar*fraway..
10:103:45
10:40 6:45
12:4 7:15
1:15 9:15
3:15 9:45
NO DISCOUNTS NO PASSES
m~n oIephl E~evine peset
4A BRIIXE 71X) FAR
1015
P200
6300
90
No Suden DeaaunaNa Psse

m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan