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July 28, 1977 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, Juy 28, 1917

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage Nine

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY I-'oge Nine

$58.5 billion deficit
predicted for budget
WASHiNGTON (AP) - The TIl DEFICIT estiiate by
chairman of the tlouse Budget ( i 3 billion ndtiler PRres-
Committee yesterday proposed i lent Iror latest ftrecast.
a budget with a 558.5 billion The i ed btdget resolttion.
deficit for the year beginning fr th- v or begisning Oct. 1,
Oct. 1. on whimi tho committee started
At the same time, Chairman wsrk WeIesday, makes a num-
Robert Giaimo, (D-Conn.), took her of ,atges in the presiden-
a swipe at the mounting authori- tial rec mrimendations, incltding
zations for farm price supports a redse:tio of nearly $3 billion
which his colleaues currently in the defense figure.

are approving and at the White
-louse for not fighting harder
to keep farm spending down.

Lake Siperior is the deepest
of the Great Lakes.

home yesterday. Brush fires swept through the dry area destroying almost 200 homes in a
wealthy area before being contained less than two miles from the Pacific Ocean.
Join The Dailym
Brush tire destroys 200 ArtsStf
homes in Santa Barbara 4

MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
SEMINAR SERIES
STANLEY J. WATSON, JR.
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY AND
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
"Immunocytochemical and Clinical Studies
of Endogenous Opiate Peptides"
The development of specific antisero against met-enkephalin,
leu enkephalin and beta-lipotropin provides the basis for
anatomical studies of these opiate peptides in brain. Studies
usina opiate antagonists to attempt to improve schizophrenic
symptoms are presented in preliminary form.
THURSDAY, JULY 28, 1977
SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m.. Room 1057 MHRI
kIND I LIVED.

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. UP)
lire fighters raced the wind
yesterday to stop a fierce brush
fire that destroyed 200 expensive
homes in this wealthy coastal
city while police sought the ar-
sonist they said sparked the con-
flagration.
The 700-acre fire was offici-
ally out of control, but it had
died down from the explosive
force of the night before when
sheets of flame tore through the
drought-parched brush from out
of the Santa Ynez Mountains.
CYCLONIC-LIKE fire storms
had erratically leap - frogged
from canyon to ridge, leaving
a patchwork of destruction
across the city's richest neigh-
borhoods where home values be-
gin at $250,000.
Police reported 22 injuries,
most of them minor burns and
smoke inhalation, and one ar-
rest for looting. No details of
the arrest were available.
Mayor David Shiffman said
that in addition to the 200 homes
destroyed, another 40 were dam-
aged by the flames.
HOW THE FIRE was set was
unknown, but city fire officials
said it started only 200 feet from
a similar 1964 fire that destroy-
ed 75 swank homes. Last week,
firemen extinguished a small
blaze near the location and later
found a time-delayed incendiary
device.
Gov. Edmund Brown Jr. de-
clared'a state of emergency and
ordered 120 National Guard
troops to help the estimated 500
firemen battling flames in this
seaside city noted for its Span-
ish-style architecture.
A layer of soot and smoke
hung in the sky Wednesday over
the city of 75,000 persons, 100
miles northwest of Los Angeles.
"THIS IS ALL I have left, my
wife and my dogs," said Artillo
Serena, a 75-year-old carpenter,
as he returned to the rubble of
the home he built 19 years ago.
His emotions were shared by
dozens of other residents who
returned "to find their lavish
homes reduced to burned, smok-
ing ruins.
The fire, spurred by hot, dry
Winds that gusted to between
40 and 60 miles an hour, burned

to within 13 blocks of down-
town, clogging the area's roads
with fleeing residents and sight-
seers.
JUST BEFORE DAWN yester-
day, the winds shifted and then
died, giving firemen and their
chemical-laden helicopters their
first real chance to halt the
spread of flame.
"We feel very comfortable
with it as it stands right now,"
Santa Barbara County Fire
Chief William Patterson said in
the morning hours. "It's not
spreading."
But Dennis Orbus, a U.S. For-
est Service spokesman, warned,
"We're still in an extreme fire
emergency. Those winds should
be shifting back toward town
and it all depends on how much
we can knock down the fire be-
fore then."
ANOTHER WORRY for fire
fighters was the low pressure
in city water pumps, caused in
part by the thousands of gal-
lons of water homeowners pour-
ed on their houses to try to
save them.
The neighborhoods in the chap-
arral and eucalyptus-covered
hills were indiscriminately hop-
scotched with untouched homes
standing next to ruins.
When the arsonist set the fire
about 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in Sy-
camore Canyon, he found fertile
ground: Brush that in normally
tinder-dry had become parched
to what fire officials called "ex- ,
plosive conditions" by two years
of drought.
AFTER THI FIRE roared out
of the canyon, it jumped from
house to tree to house in the
Riviera section, the city's weal-
thiest area.
Downhill, in the path of the
flames, residents jammed their
cars with valuable, easily mov-
ed items such as jewelry, tele-
vision sets, silverware and per-
sonal momentoes. Then they
fled down the narrow, twisting
mountain road.
Some clung stubbornly to their
homes as the flames burned
' down the canyons. Residents
who refused to budge were
warned they would have to face
the blaze alone. Some waited
until the last possible moment,
trying to decide what to take
with them.

11I

Gen~e Littler
It's possible to go into an annual checkup feeling terrific.
And come out knowing something's wrong. It happened to
me. The doctor found what I couldn't even feel ... a little
lump under my arm. If I had put off the appointment for
one reason or another, I probably wouldn't be here today.
Because that little lump I couldn't feel was a melanoma, a
highly aggressive form of cancer that spreads very quickly.
It's curable-but only if found in time.
So when I tell you, "Get a checkup," you know It's from
my heart. It can save your life. I know. It saved mine.
HaLve a regular checkup.,
It can save yourlfe
SAmercan Cancer Societ4
Via tC(5:i****'fUtirS Pi*i5(#55i"i( SDht

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