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July 22, 1977 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-22

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pge Ten

THE M4C~lGAN DAILY

Friday, July 22, 19771

r

pg T.TH IC-ICNDAL Fiaul 2,17

Judge says hitchhiking Carter speaks in Yazoo
wo eon should eXn ct sex Contnued from Page s) abartion was a human rights dicted that, in any event '
U ARTER SAID this as he issue. might very well need ane

LOS ANGELES I'-A woman
t'humbing a ride in a metropoli-
tan area should be prepared for
sexual ad ances by any man
who pick' her up, a California
appeals court has warned in
reversing a rape conviction.
"The lone female hitchhiker
in the absence of an emergencv
situation, as a practical matter,
advises all who pass by that she
is wiltiug to enter the vehicle
with ayone who stops and in so
doing advertises she has less
concern far the consequences
than the average female," wrote
Justice lynn Compton . in a
uanimous raling by the 2nd Dis-
trict Court of Appeals.
'UN1DE R SUCH circum-
stances it wtiuld not be unrea
sonable for a man in the posi-
tion of defendant here to believe
that the female would consent,
to sexual relations" he added.
Compton said "it may not
speak well of the prevailing

standard of morality" but "in
the light of all the warning sig-
nalts that appear almost daily in
the news media," a woman
hitchhiking alone in an urban
area should at least be aware
of the possibility.
The d e c i s i o n Wednesday.
brought quick and angry reac-
tion from women's activists.
"I DON'T think it's a very
responsible statement because
it's giving licenses and permis-
sion for sexually assaultive per-
sons to act without any kind of
social limit," said Connie Rus-
sell of the National Organization
for Women and a volunteer rape
counselor at Cedars-Sinai Medi-
cal Center.
"The act of hitchhiking is an
act of transportation, it is not a
social contact situation like a
date and it is in no way sexual,"
she said. "If she gets on the bus,
does the bus driver have the
same privilege?"

ci'ed continued high unemploy-
ment as one of the disappoint-
ments of his first six months in
office.
The program is expected to
be mwade public early next
month.
The President spoke in re-
sponse to questions asked of
himn in the Yazoo City High
School gymnasium.
There was no air-condition-
ing in the building and Carter
faced an audience that was
constantly waving small hand-.
held fans.
"I think it's time the rest of
the country sees the southern
self - propelled air conditioning
we have here," he said.
THE FORUM was the third
such gathering the President
has attended. He spoke at one
in Clinton, Mass. in late April,
and at a similar session in Los
Angeles on May 17.
After answering a question
on human rights, the President
was asked whether he thought

1 do think the abortion issue
invlves a question of human
rig ts - the right of a woman
to have control over her own
body, free from interference of
government, and on the other
hand, the right of the embry-
onic child" to birth, he said.
CARTER TOLD the audience
that his campaign for human
rights and others like it in
other countries have had "a
ciinrulative effect."
Ite said Argentina had re-
lea-ed 342 political prisoners
ann that South Korea, a U. S.
ally criticized for its repression,
also was freeing political pri-
sonrs who had been jailed for
a long time.
Carter acknowledged that he
han been criticized "for being
so outspoken" about human
rights.
I . T H O U T mentioning
the Soviet Union, he said he
w-s not trying to make anyone
angry or revive the, cold war,
by talking abouttthehuman
rights issue.. ,
In response to one question,
Carter defended administration
efforts to work out a new
treaty governing the status of
said, "our actions must be
the Panama Canal. But he pre-

canal" that could accomm
date very large ships thin
the foreseeable future
Carter said a constructin of
a sea-level canal was consid-
ered and abandoned as too cost
ly during the Johnson adminis-
tration ' in the 190.s R he
said the need for a new wa
way has become more urgen
since then.
F A R L I E R yesterv
Carter again pledged hindtif
to r long-range quest f s i
relations between America anJ
the Soviet Union, saying tt.
g->at is not for easy or tra
siont agreements but ",tlns
that are meaningful, hlmr
And lasting."
2n a speech in Chavir'su
S. C., clearly aimed as mwt
at Soviet and other world lcted
era as his immediate audience
of southern legislatotrs tie
President called for 'a rr
tioship nf-cooperationthat!uti
be routed in the natiintat tnt
ests of both" countries
And while we mtst tsvm
combine realism with prton
ple ' toward that end, u
faithful to the essential %.tite
to which our society is dedr
cated."

'U' students join Kent St. protest rally

tountused from Pate I
we had some people come from
California yesterday (Wednes-
da ), Phibbn said.
"Support from the faculty
heire) has been really good
and growing. A lot of them are
becoming radicalized," she
added "Before they were just
AUGUST GRADS:
DEADLINE FOR ORDERING
A CAP AND GOWN IS
FRI., JULY 22, '77
$2 Lote Charge for Gowns
Ordered After Deadine
AVAILABLE ONLY AT THE
U-CELLAR
in the Basement of the
Michioan Union

observers but now they are
becoming more actively involv-
ed. (Earlier) they read a paper
condemning the administration
which is a big step for them."
Persons who couldn't active-
ly participate in the rallies
have indicated their moral sup-
port through letters and cash
donations. The coalition has
received $7,000. $4,000 of those
funds went towards legal fees
when 193 persons were arrest-
ed,
PIBBS EXPECTS the re-
maining funds will be used in
legal fees if the court decides
to allow construction to begin,
"If we don't use up the rest in
legal defense it will be donated
and used for a good cause," she
said.

The coalition discounts the
idea of negotiating a compro
mise which would give the
University its gym and stil
satisfy the coalitions cause.
"The administration would
like to put up a chapel there
bit people don't want any
thing there," Phipps said.
She explained that any build
ing on the site would dilute the
horror of May 4, 1970. One must
see the total site free from ob
structions to realize the guards
men were not threatened and
the students were needlessly
cut down by guardsmen bullets
she said,
Nylon was invented by fr
Wallace Hume Car'rothers it
1937.

e
ll

Ferency campaigns
with unique. style

- (Continued from Page 1)
about government as the em-
t ployer of last resort, I think it
could be the employer of first
resort. The state should pro-
vide capital for the expansion
of industry, through the Eco-
nomic Development Authority,
rather than paying for the
costs of welfare programs for
the unemployed."
n FERENCY WOULD also,
move the state into the insur-
ance business, by providing in-
surance that does not discrimi-
nate against the old and the
young. It is being done in pro-
vinces in Canada," said Fer-
ency, "there is no reason it
can't be done here."
Public banking is also high
on Ferency's list of priorities.
He said a state bank would be
profitable for Michigan, and at
thv same time it would provide
low interest loans for small
businesses and students. Feren-
cy said a state bank is pres-
ently working very well in
North Dakota.
"I would also provide the
leadership for tax reform, for a
fair and equitable system bas-
ed on a graduated scale," said
Ferency. He termed the pres-
ent flat rate tax system "man-
ifestly unfair"
FERENCY WOULD also seek
to convert the state's largest
indtstry from producing pri-
vate autos to the manufacture
of mass transit equipment.
"One point on which I agree
wito Carter, is that the auto
is an outmoded means of trans-
portation, because of our ener-
gy situation. I think it is very
important in Michigan, where
out' second largest industry is
tourism, that we reclaim our
abandoned railroad beds and
provide tourist trains."
Ferency also said he would
establish a system of hostels
around the state, so people
could tour the state on bicyycle
or foot, similar to hostel sys-
tems in European countries.
THE FOUR-TIME guberna-
tocial candidate also seeks
de ,ocratic control over utili-

private profit.
"If people in Midland a
they don't want a nuclear por
er plant in their area of te
state, it wouldn't happen, as
long as power corporatintis
were servants of the people,'
sail Ferency.
Concerning Governor WlW
liam Milliken's political future,
Ferency said he took the Go-
ernor seriously when he said
he may be retiring from actise
political life. But Ferency sa vs
if Milliken continues in public
life, he will probably run fm
governor again, rather than
seeking Senator Robert Ctif-
fin's Senate seat.
"MILLIKEN AND his wife
have never been affected withr
Potomac fever," said Feretrsy
"It's a long way from Traterse
City, and Bill likes to get hack
there quite often.
' Besides, he has political li-
abilities that would make i dif
ficult for him to run for any
office, like PBB, his dilatorv
tactics on the Seafarer contro-
versy and the deposit of nuclear
wastes below Michigan sails,
and his inability to pronide
employment in the central ci-
ties."
Ferency said that the civil
disturbance in New York dur-
ing the black-out is evidence
that people, especially people
in the central cities, cannot be
left without jobs and without
hope.
"WE MUST make cities liv-
able again," said Ferency.
"We have to re-attract people
to cities by improving facili-
ties and encouraging private
enterprise to re-enter the
cities."
Ferency said there must be
an economic initiative to eat-
ploy people who are unskilled
and untrained. He said if Pri-
vate enterprise cannot do it,
public enterprise must,
"The taxpayer is fed up w't
supporting private enterprise.
Lansing voters are going t
support Fisher Body, who has
been given a $12 billion tax rf'
bate by the city fathers. G9
(General Motors) has a lot
nerve, to pull a stunt like tha
in a tax oppressed city

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