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July 22, 1977 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-22

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Friday, July 22, 1977

IHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

__ EMCIA AIYPg ee

Proposed sewage plant
receives funding boost

By RON DeKETT
Tie proposed Ann Arbor sew-
c plant received a funding
h bnt Wednesday when t h e
Wvshtenaw County Board of
Commissioners approved a re-
,oition authorizing the sale of
bods for plant expansion.
The bonds, a total of $6 mil-
lion will knock a sizeable
chtnk out of the expected $30
million cost of Phase II of the
sewage plant construction plan.
Phase II deals with on site ex-
pansion of the original plant.
TOTAL PLANT improvement
and expansion cost is expected
to reach $43 million.. The fed-
eral government, through the
Environmental Protection Ag-
ency (EPA), will foot 75 per
rem of the cost. The state will
handle five per cent and local
governments pick up the final
20 per cent of project fees.
Ann Arbor City Council must
now approve the county bond
contract.
Plant expansion is expected
to be completed by mid 1980.

The Board also approved sim-
ilar bonds measures for North-
field Township and Dexter.
Ncrthfield Township will re-
ceive $680,000, while Dexter is
authorized for $700,000 in bond
sales.,
IN OTHER action, the Com-
missioners agreed to create a
county executive administra-
tor position although they were
unable to agree on the future
administrator's job responsi-
bilities.
she position was created to
deal with implementing the
poheys handed down by the
Commissioners but controversy
arose over the specifics of the
job. The Administration Com-
mittee now has the task of de-
finig the job description.
THE NEW COUNTY ° Admin-
istrator will be paid $30 to $40
thousand annually.
Also authorized were 15 new
correction officer positions for
the new county jail facilities lo-
cated in Pittsfield Township.
The officers will be hired by
mid-September with an annual

salary per officer, including
benefits, of $9,423.
IN ADDITION, the Board ap-
proved a sliding fee schedule
for services provided by the Al-
cohol Abuse Prevention Pro-
gram of the Washtenaw Coun-
ty Health Department, whose
clients include those arrested
for an alcohol related incidents
and referred to the program by
judges.
Previously, clients were not
required to pay for counseling
services rendered by the pro-
gram.
The fee schedule effective
August 1, based on gross in-
come for a ,minimum six ses-
sions, is as follows:
* $6,999 and below-no charge
* $7,000 to $9,999-$6.00
* $10,000 to $14,999-$12.00
* $15,000 to $24,000-.$20.00
g $25,000 and above-$25.00
individual and group coun-
seling for persons with a gross
income $8,00 and up costs $2.00
per session for a minimum of
six sessions.

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

Egypt, Libya clash at border

(continued from Page 1)
bombed the village of al-Mar-
jas "including all its civilian
installations, aiming to kill wo-
men, the aged and children."
The official Libyan statement
accused Egypt of "direct ag-
gression" and saiddthe Libyan
people intend to defend their
land "and the sanctity of their
soil'..
The broadcast called the
Egyptian account "a baseless
N. campus
to harbor
Engine
School
Chemical Co. and University
alumni.
"The quality of any university
is difficult to maintain. We sur-
vive not only because of public
support but also through the
great help you've given us,"
Fleming told the 150 persons
gathered for the groundbreaking
ceremony.
'The department's goal is to
establish a national center for
naval arcihtecture and marine
engineeriig, encompassing edu-
cation, research and technologi-
cal developments," Knott told
the group gathered under a yel-
low and green striped tent.
TWO-THIRDS of the naval
architects in the U.S. have grad-
uated from this department.
"For the department it's a big
move, but not on the University
level," Ogilvie said earlier. "But
I think the major point is that
the funds for construction came
as a direct result of our capital
campaign."
The College of Engineering
has been in the process of mov-
ing to North Campus since the
mid-Fifties. The move was in-
itiated by Dean George Granger
Brown.

lie and completely false," say-
ing "its purpose was to mis-
lead innocent Egyptian officers
and men and also to mislead
the Egyptian people and to dis-
trct them from the serious in-
terral problems they are ex-
periencing."
EFFORTS WERE under way
in Cairo to convene an emer-
gency meeting of the Arab
League to resolve the conflict.
Reports indicated Mahmoud
Riad, the league's secretary
general, was in urgent consul-
tations with the member states
trying to convene a meeting at
the foreign minister level.
Ciad issued a statement de-
ploring the "terrible incidents
along the border" and urging
the - sides not to escalate the
conflict.
Cairo radio said, "A force of
Libyan armored cars supported
by artillery opened fire on the
Egyptian military post at Sa-
lum, forcing Egyptian troops to
confront the aggressor and
chase them back west of the
village of Musaid on the Lib-
yan side of the border.
"LIBYAN PLANES tried to
raid our posts. Egyptian air de-
fenses downed two planes. With
the entrance of the Libyan air
force, it was inevitable the
Egyptian air force also should
become engaged to protect the
E yptian ground forces," Cairo
radio said. The radio did not
say how long the battle lasted.
The reported clash between

the two Arab nations was the
fourth border incident in a
month between oil-rich Libya
a ii d economically troubled
Egypt. The two once planned to
unite and form one nation.
An Egyptian military com-
minique said Egypt's counter-
attack was "in retaliation for
Lihyan aggression and intend-
ed to secure Egypt's western
border."
The most serious of the pre-
vious clashes took place two
days ago and led to the destruc-
lion of 20 Libyan military ve-
hicles and their crews and left
nine Egyptians dead, Cairo ra-
dio said.
Egypt accused Libya Wednes-
day of seeking to overthrow
President Anwar Sadat by en-
gaging in a "large-scale terror-
ist plot" with Moslem fanatics
who earlier this month kidnap-
ed and killed Sheik Mohammed
Zababi,. former religious af-
fairs minister in the Egyptian
cabinet.
Have a flair for
artistic writinq?
It you are interest-
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music
or writing teature
stories about the
drama, dance, fim
arts: ContactcArts
Editorcee The
Michiga Dsiiy.

- r
C a
SPECIALS
' TUESDAY JULY 19 C.
I' HEAD
HELADIES' NIGHT
" WEDNESDAY JULY 20 6
SHOTGUN
STUDENT NIGHT '
* * THURSDAY JULY 21 &'
( SHOTGUN ,
a GREEKS & DORMS
s ' FRIDAY-SUNDAY JULY 22-24
. ~ McCAFFREY.
SUNDAY: Pitchers & Hospitality
MONDAY JULY 25 q
MUGSBY & MERLIN :.
TEQUILA NIGHT
* a
A Public Service of thisa#
newspaper& The Advertising Council
counting
Red Cross.
The Good Neighbor.

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THE 39 STEPS
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chase story-line and plenty of dark humor. A
Canadian Robert Donat) cracks a spy ring
with a beautiful English girl (Madeleine Car-
roll) handcuffed to him. And remember Mr.
Memory?
Sat: DAVID COPPERFIELD
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCI. AUD.
7:30 & 9:30 Admission $1.25

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