100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 16, 1977 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, July 16, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Saturday, July 16, 1977 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

No-fault insurance
may go nationwide

WASHINGTON (') - A Car-
ter administration endorse-
ment yesterday strengthened
the possibility that Congress
will approve nationwide no-
fault automobile insurance af-
ter a decade of considering it.
"It is time now to enact no-
fault," Transportation Secre-
tary Brock Adams told the Sen-
ate Commerce Committee. It
was the first endorsement by
an administration since the
initial congressional hearings
were held on no-fault in 167.
SEN. WARREN Magnuson,
(D-Wash.), chairman of the
Senate Commerce Committee
and author of the bill, said the
administration backing would
help push the measure through
Congress after years of nar-
row defeats.
Adams said consumers under
the present auto liability insur-
sore system get back only 44
cents in benefits for each dollar
in premiums.
This figure surprised Magnu-
son, who has been holding
hearings on no-fault for a dec-
ade.
"IN THE PAST, I have been
saying that if you pay a dollar
for insurance you can fight for
50 cents of that. Now I can
change that to 44 cents.
"There is something very
wrong in such a system," Mag-
nuson said: Adams told the
panel that the 44 cents per dol-
lar recovery rate was based
on 46,000 fatalities and almost
five million injuries in automo-
bile accidents during 1975.
"We must correct the inequi-
ties and inefficiencies that have
been so prevalent," Adams
said.
UNDER NO-FAULT, already
adopted in some form by 16
states, persons are compen-
sated for injuries in car acci-
dents by their own insurance
companies regardless of who is
to blame for the accidents. Un-
der the traditional liability sys-
tem, insurance companies must
determine through lawsuits
which driver was at fault and
therefore which insurance com-
pany must compensate vic-
tims.
The secretary said the 44 per
cent figure compares to 70 to
90 per cent for such other in-
surance as private health in-
surance, workmen's compensa-
tion and Social Security.
"As a matter of national con-
science, we must turn next to
aid the automobile accident vic-
tims. We must see that they
get prompt and fair compensa-
tion for losses resulting from
injury or death without the
need to decide who is to blame
for the tragedy,"- Adams said.
MAGNUSON'S bill would re-
quire each state that has not
already done to so replace a
liability insurance system that
relies on proving fault with a
no-fault system. It also would
establish federal minimum
standards for state no - fault
systems.
Under the Magnuson bill, no-
fault policies would have to re-
imburse the purchaser for the
first $100,000 of his or her own
medical and - rehabilitation
costs, up to $12,000 in lost
wages, and forthe cost of ob-
taining a housekeeper or other
home aid care.
Car insurance that does not
deal with personal injuries, such
as collision coverage, would
not be affected.
THlE COMMITTEE
alto has been receiving en-
dorsements of his no-fault bill
from an increasing part of the
insuranuce industry.
"We fully support the prin-
ciple of federal minimum no-
fault standards" said James

Noyes of the National Associa-
tion of Casualty & Surety Ag-
ents. The group formerly op-
posed federal legislation, say-
ing that states should work out
their own systems.
Also testifying for the bill
was Douglas Fraser, presi-
dent of the United Auto Work-
ers, a long-time proponent of
nationwide no-fault,
REDUCED RATES for
Bowling
50c per game
Saturday 11 avn-6 pm
at the
UNION

A varied and interesting assortment of sports trivia
Lou Brock of the Cardinals The first twlo times Gene Te- The first pitcher ever to hit
stole seven bases in the 1967 nace, then with Oakland, came a grand slam homer in World
World Series and then stole to bat in World Series action he Series history was Dave Mc-
seven more in the 198 series. hit home rues. It was in 1972. Nally of Baltimore in 1970.
Only one player in pro foot- Defensive end Gino March- "Breed the best to the best
ball history made 2,000 points etti, who had uniform number and hope for the best" is the
- George Blanda, who retired 89, has the highest number in slogan of thoroughbred horse
with 2,002. the Pro Football Hall of Fame. breeders.
HOUSING DIVISION
'- FOR 1977-78 ACADEMIC YEAR
POSSIBLE POSITION OPENING FOR A GRADUATE STUDENT
TEACHING ASSISTANT IN THE PILOT PROGRAM ALICE LLOYD HALL
The Pilot Proqrom, an innovative lip ino-learning center for freshoersons and sophomores,
sponsored iointly by LS&A and Housina may have a Graduate Student Teaching Assistant
position open. Graduate Student Teachina .Assistants teach courses of their own design and
hove corridor counseling duties. The courses should be within the liberal arts traditions and
have contemporary social, political, cultural or ethical implications. Graduate Student Teach-
inn Assistants must be skilled writers and be prepared, whatever their maior, to assist students
with writing problems. Remuneration consists of a .25 Graduate Student Teaching Assistant
tapproximately $2200 per year), plus a sinole room and board.
Staff application forms are available starting July 12, 1977 in Chorlene Coody's office,
1500 SAB.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: 4:00 P.M., JULY 19, 1977
A NON-DISCRIMINATORY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

Wanted!
people who can:

If you can spend some time, even a few hours, with someone who needs
a hand, not a handout, call your local Voluntary Action Center
or write to: "Volunteer:" Washington, D.C. 20013 Weneedyou.
S aeuss, The National Center for Voluntary Action.,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan