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July 15, 1977 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-15

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The Michigan Daily
Vol. LXXXVII, No. 44-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, July 15, 1977 Ten Cents Twelve Pages
Regents boost tuition 8.75%4

By GREGG KRUPA
The University Board of
Regents yesterday adopted
an operating budget for
the 1977-78 school year and
approved a tuition increase
averaging 8.75 per cent.
Tuition for instate lower
classpersons will be $504
per term, an increase of
$40. Non - resident lower
classpersons w ill p a y
$1,610. They currently pay
desient upper classpersons
will pay $574, an increase of
$48. Non-resident upperclass-
persons will pay $1,740. They
now pay $1,626.
THE TUITION RATES for
students in graduate - profes-
sional programs will be:
. Medicine and dentistry -
residents $1,040 per term (now
$920); non-residents $2,080 (now
$1,840). 1
Public Health - residents
Mr $860 (now $824); non-residents
$1,900 (now $1,824),
Law - residents $825 (now
$750); non-residents $720 (now
$636); non-residents $1,660 (now
$1,508).
Despite the tuition increase,
Vice-President for Academic
Affairs Frank Rhodes said
BILINSY 1977-78 will be an "unusually
Lional Con- difficult year" for the Univer-
ts to divest sity Rhodes noted that an en-
atdiet forced savings program isn the
in Ameri- amount of $1,150,396 must be
made during the year to bal-

ance the budget. Operating
units will, however, be given a
one-year leeway in making
those cuts, which will be re-
flected in the 1978-79 budget.
THE TOTAL operating bud-
get for the University's Ann Ar-
bor campus of $440,907,309 is
made up of four budgets.
The general fund budget of
$188,248,240 - an increase of
$25.5 million dollars over last
year - covers expenditures in-
duced by teaching, research, li-
brary services, public services,

student aid, and administrative
and business operations.
Revenues for the General
Fun Budget are generated from
state appropriations, $109,937,-
490; student revenues, $62,260,-
750; and indirect cost recovery,
$13,000,000.
THE OTIIER three budgets
include; a Designated Fund
budget of $10 million which in-
cludes gifts and grants with
uses restricted by University
policies, the Expendable Re-
See REGENTS, Page 3

Carter calm despite
N. Korean shooting
of U.S helicopter
WASHINGTON (A ) President Carter said yesterday that
the U.' S. helicopter shot down in North Korea had flown over
Communist territory by mistake and that "our primary interest
is in having the incident not escalate into a confrontation."
Three American crewmen were killed and a fourth was cap-
tured yesterday in the latest incident marring the uneasy Korean
truce. The North Koreans later failed to show up for a meeting
sought by the American-led United Nations command and the
discussion is set for Saturday (10 p.m. EDT today).
PRESS SECRETARY Jody Powell told reporters yesterday
afternoon that North Korean members of the armistice commis-
sion said the captured man had been wounded and was receiving
medical treatment.
Powell said he did not know whether U. S. troops in South
Korea were placed on alert. But a Pentagon spokesperson said
See CARTER, Page 9

Dumi Martz, a representative of the African Nat
gress (ANC) of South Africa, encouraged the Regent
the University of some $43 million in investments
can companies in South Africa.

Nurses
By KEITH B. RICHBURG
After 93 grueling h o u r s of
poring over thousands of con-
fusing and often conflicting tes-
timony, the nine women and
tlfree men of the jury convicted
nurses Leonora Perez and Fi-
lipina Narciso of poisoning pa-
tients at the Ann Arbor Vet-
eran's Administration (VA) Hos-
pital. But because of the com-
plex nature of the case, many
people are still uncertain of just
what crimes the .nurses were
found guilty. The following is a
description of each incident for
which the two were convicted,
including the victim's name, the
name of the nurse in question,
and the details of the crime.
* Mark Hogan, 75 - Narciso
was convicted of injecting Pavu-
lon, a powerful muscle-relaxant,
into the retired carpenter's in-
travenous medication tube.
NARCISO WAS, by 'testimony '
and her own admission, with
Hogan in his room about five
minutes before his breathing
failure, she told the old man ;1$'
"Have a nice dinner,. Mr. Ho-
gan." A few minutes later Ho-
gan stopped breathing.
*Charles Gassmire, 87-year- MEMBERS o
old retired insurance salesman, low nurses, con
See A, Page 12 Detroit yesterd

still

outon bond
By KEITH B. RICHBURG
Special To The aily
DETROIT-A Federal district
judge ruled yesterday thatl Fi-
lipina N a r c i s o and Leonora
Perez, the two nurses convicted
of the 1975 Veteran's Adminis-
tration (VA) Hospital poisonings,
may remain free on $75,000 bond
apiece.
Judge Philip Pratt made Iis
decision at a bond hearing,
'.while outside the Federal Build-
ing about 200 supporters of
Narciso and Perez picketed in
protest of Wednesday's guilty
x verdict.
THE PEACEFUL protestors,
- . mostly members of the Philip-
pine Nurses Association (PNA)
and most of them still in their
white uniforms, carried signs
that read: "Miscarriage of Jus-
tice isthe crime," and "Justice
died in Detroit-Weep for it."
"I'm really amazed at the
show-up because this was an
overnight plan," spokeswoman
'/Erlinda Santos said. "Some of
/ / them (the picketing nurses) just
got off the midnight-to-seven
shift and came right down."
AP Photi Santos said the nurses are
ciation (PNA) demonstrate in support of two fel- hoping to get a favorable deci-
y a federal jury, outside the U. S. Courthouse in sion on the defense's motion for
See NURSES, Page 10

F THE Philippine Nurses Asso
wvicted on poisoning charges by
day morning.

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