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May 06, 1977 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Fourteen FHE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, May 6, 19'
Is women plea
for end to violence

(Continued from Page 3)
McDonald said she thinks the.
Peace Movement has alleviated
the lack of communications be-
tween the people, which she call-
ed "our greatest drawback."
She said her hopes for the future
lie with both Catholic and Pro-
testant youth.
"In my hometown, tathcoole,
the youth had a clean-up cam-
paign with the youth of Catholic
$auman community," she said.
"And it's happening all over
Northern Ireland."
YOUTH COMMUNITY centers
are one of the projects the
movement has initiated to "cre-
ate and build a peaceful society
which we all want," McDonald
said. Mini-buses where no public,
transportation exists, rehabilita-
tion centers for ex-prisoners, and
houses for Ireland's battered
wiver, are also part of the plan.
Co-founder Williams explained
that although she had planned
to bring films of the violence in
Northern Ireland "I'm not the
type to take vapors (faint), but
two and a half minutes of the
film was all I could get
through."
"When I saw dead people
brushed into plastic bags, I
questioned 'Where is the quality
of human life?' "
Williams marched in the 1968

civil rights movement which
created the old division between
Catholics and Protestants. "I
was for a united, Gaelic, and
free Ireland. But you can't unite
anything in blood," she said.
THE "ELIMINATION of all
nine armies, including British,
Protestant and Catholic fighting
groups, from Northern Ireland's
streets is one of the peace move-
ment's goals.
"I believe that economics
caused the violence," Williams
added. "In my home(town)
there are 8,000 families but no
factories for employment or rec-
reation areas for the children.
"We've scratched the surface
for a political vacuum that sees
either United Ireland or British
control," she said. "Until we
unite the Northern Ireland peo-
ple into one and stop the killing
and hatred, can we start to build
justice in all of Ireland."
Williams also warned against
sending money to Irish organi-
zations. "You could be buying
a bullet."
"It may take 50, maybe 100
years, but I see friendships
building. We reject the use of
the bomb, bullet or other forms
of violence. We must work with a
our neighbors so that the trage-
dies are bad memories," Wil-
liams said. t

BRITISH PRIME Minister James Callaghan greets President Carter durinJ arrival ceremonies
at London's Heathrow Airport yesterday. Carter flew to London to attend the Economic Summit,
his first foreign trip since he took office.
Carter arrive in London

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n
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C
c
n
ti

(Continued from Page 3)
we shall be tracing in a cour-
geous fashion the special prob-
ems that affect human beings
n the need for better educa-
ion, jobs and inflation," he
said.
Callaghan referred to the eco-
nomic issues facing the leaders
of the summit"participants -
he United States, Britain, West
Germany, Japan, France, ttaly,
,anada and the European Cam-
non Market.
CARTER WAS asked in an in-
:erview with reporters aboard
Ar Force One en route to Lon-
U-M Billiards1
This game is ready
whevn ii re

don if he would have new initia-
tives for the summit. "We will
have, yes," Carter responded.
Carter, who did not elaborate
on the initiatives, listed the
aims of the summit'in remarks
during a departure ceremony
at the White House.
AT THE summit and during
private talks Carter said he
will pursue "our long-range
goals of world peace . . . nu-
clear disarmament . . . and
reducing the sale of convention-
al arms."
The President said he and for-
eign leaders will discuss ener-
gy, efforts to curb the spread
of sensitive, nuclear know-how
and pursue the "sharing of
world trade."
He told reporters en route to
London that "loans and direct
aid for less developed coun-
tries" wason the agenda as
well as "a mechanism to con-
tinue these discussions" at a
lower level and more regular-
ly.
CARTER SAID he was so well
briefed and "so crammed with
information and advice that it
reminds me of the presidential
debates."

Carter predicted he would re.
turn to the United States hav.
ing made "a major step" for-
ward and added: "I think when
I come back we'll have had a
successful trip."
White House Press Cecretary
Jody Powell cautioned against
expecting announcements of
"radical departures" at thk;
summit.
"He doesn't expect to solc
all those problems," Powel
said.
Carter's foreign trade repre
sentative, Ambassador Rober
Strauss, said Carter "will be
very strong" on trying to move
international trade talks a
Geneva off dead center. They
have been stalled for two years
A total of 129 million Ameri
cans were licensed to drive m
tor vehicles in 1975. The nation
al leader was California, wit
13.5 million licensed drivers
New York had 8.8 million an
Texas 7.5 million holders d
driver's licenses.
Alaska has great rivers .l
glacial ice, one as large as th
entire state of Rhode Island.

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