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July 07, 1977 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rage en

THE MiCHtGAN DAILY

Hot time-summer in the city:
Locals find the weather a pity

Thursday, July 7, 197,
2nd degree murder not
an option for VA jurors

(Coetutt f r f m lf'Kl(-
ade. "You have a sauna first,
then a limeade," he explained,
Some people' need no strate-
gies against the heat, however.
Their tolerance comes natur-
ally, as Randy Milgrom's dnes.
AS HE energetically jogs
down South University Ave.,
Milgrom explained his victory
over the scorching heat and
high humidity simply. "It
doesn't bother me. I like to
sweat. I think I'm a little bit
of a masochist,"
Milgrom also offers another
strategy for coping with the
weather - sitting around his
apartment nude.
An even more unique way to
beat the heat was offered by
Douglas Reid. "My secret way
of beating the heat is running
nude through the fountains of
Ann Arbor," Reid said.
But Reid admitted the
thought is ouly a fantasy, albeit

a nice one,
Reid admitted that along with
most people, the weather is un-
beatable for him.
"I am not enjoying this wea-
ther," he complained. "I am
constantly dripping."
Perhaps the answer to the
heat can be found from a group
of children who were laughing,
playing, and singing in about a
five inch deep "pool" in Burns
Park yesterday.
"I'm not hot, it feels good,"
one exclaimed.
"Even people who are 30
years old can do it."
ICE CREAM seems to be an-
other way of refreshing your-
self from the weather.
"It seemed like a good way to
cool off. That is, if I can figure
out how to keep the ice cream
from melting fast enough so I
can eat it," said Susan Olds,
battling her peach ice cream
cone, which seemed intent on

dripping over her fingers.
As she ate her cone, Olds of-
fered advice to others who plan
to get some ice cream.
"GET A SHERBET rather
than regular ice cream," she
said. "It's more refreshing."
But if you can't tolerate the
heat on any terms, take conso-
lation in the fact that hardly
anybody can.
The National Weather Service
reported a "discomfort index"
of 84, which equalled a previous
record. The discomfort index
measures the body's ability to
handle temperature and hu-
midity.
IF ALL ELSE fails, you might
consider joining the rest of the
crowd and purchasing a port-
able air conditioner.
Highland Appliance reported
that their sales have gone up
at least 200 per cent since the
scorching weather started.

(Continued ftrm Page 1)
itution ,and the use of a poison."
Speculation arose that the
question means the jury thinks
the patient was poisoned.
The patient, Herman, was
found dead in his doom at the
hospital, and his death was be-
lieved to be natural until an FBI
toxicologist exhumed the body
and found traces of Pavulon us-
ing a never-before-used extrac-
tion technique.
WILLIAM MILLER, a patient
in the room across the hall from
Herman, testified that a mental
patient had been standing in
Herman's room for up to 15
minutes, feeling and stroking
the murder victim's long thin
intrarenoius medication tpbes.
After Pratt reread his instruc-
tions, and the jury was dismiss-
ed to resume its deliberations,
federal prosecutor Richard Yan-
ko objected to what Pratt had

By the time
we're old enough to
have children, we've
been thoroughly sold
on the idea.
By our parents,
our grandparents,
our friends and
neighbors, the media,
everyone.
It's hard to
remember we ever
had a choice in the
first place.
But there is a
choice. Having a
child is a tremendous
responsibility and
an important decision.
Probably the most
important decision
well ever make.
And once it's
made, it can never
be undone.
Just remember ..
you do have a choice.
So think about it,
and do what's right
for you.
For more information write:
Natonal
Organization
for
Non-Parents
806 Reisterstown Road
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
1d fike to know more about ft O t
Please send me yo free
'Am i Parent t seral" paCkage

just told them
"The court's instructions did
not adequately clarify to the
jury that which concerned it"
Yanko said.
Yanko said that "If a poison
is used, it constitutes premed.
tation."
Judge Pratt disagreed with
Yanko, defending the cours in.
structions. "It is important to
recognize here that the drst
allegedly used is not necessrirl
a poison," Pratt said.
PAVULON, the drug i cn
tention, is used often durng
surgery and is prescribed reg
larly to relax the muscles Ti
VA poison victims were ni pre
scribed Pavlon, and the re
ceived it in huge doses
"We're not dealing with a
drug like arsenic whichb y its
very nature is a poison, l'Prt
said. Therefore, he added the
premeditation requirement of
first-degree murder muis he
proven separately
The second devehipmes, in
the case came when the prose-
cutien and defense lawyers
showed up a1 the Fedeal Itild.
ing for a private conference it-t
Pratt in his chamersI twat,
revealed later that Yankohad
asked that the jury be alowed
to consider second-degree mr
der as an alernative in the lnt
man count.
THE JUDGE deniedhthe it
quest, and now the jury has only
two options in deciding the
charge-either guilty of firti-de
gree murder, which require
premeditation, or not guit
Does 'coke'
add life ?
(Gaunue frnt hpm .
Many individuals use it for spe-
cial occasion sand with chase
friends.
ONE USER said. itis a a so-
cial drug. You take it for some
thing special like seeing the
fireworks the other day or mu-
sic at a concert."
Murray contends that more
people are willing to try co-
caine because it has received
relatively good reviews from
users of the drug.
"COCAINE IS not seen as a
dangerous drug," he said. "PeO-
ple who would not experiment
with other drugs will expen-
ment with cocaine because
they think it is safe."
The study said cocaine is o
physically addicting but ca
cause psychological depend'
-ene, Continued use can reul
in irritation of nostrils and na-
sal membranes and a perpeu3l
"runny nose" caused i'
"snorting" the cocaine three
the nose,
"To tell you the truth I th-t
it is safer than alcohol." sid
one user. "I know it doesn't d
anything to your liver or stm,
ach. Besides it is really nice to
do."
SOME PEOPLE use it for the
physical rush it provides.
One coke user and dealer
said, "I use coke for the sand
reason people have used dr0
for centuries: euphoria, exie-
ment, recreation and what Y*
will.
,I sell coke because ef
friends enjoy using the dub
too. And I like to make
available to theta. I only d
with friends' because of the (f
lice) dangers everyone kn
about."

namne

address
'r'a
Itystoels
J -e-y-e-a-p
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