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June 30, 1977 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1977-06-30

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T hursday, June 30, 1977

Rebel bishop ordains priests

ECONE, Switzerland (AP) --
Intoning his blessings in forbid-
den Latin, rebel Archbishop
Marcel Lefebvre ordained 14
new priests yesterday in an act
of defiance to Pope Pal VI that
could end in a historic schism
of traditionalists from the Ro-
man Catholic Church.
The newly ordained priests
were mostly Frenchmen, but
they included an American, An-
thony Cekada, 26, of Milwaukee,

Wis. Another American, Ter-
rence Finnegan, 34, of Rapid
City, S.D., was consecrated as
a subdeacon.
THE VATICAN radio prompt-
ly denounced the French arch-
bishop's action, saying he "has
made irreparable his breaking
with the unity and charity of
the communion of the Church."
The Pope earlier this month
threatened Archbishop Lefebvre

MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
SEMINAR SERIES
E PHRAIM YAVIN
THE WEIZMAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE
REHOVOT, ISRAEL
"ACQUISITION OF CELLULAR COMPONENTS
DURING MATURATION OF CEREBRAL CELLS
IN CULTURE: A SURVEY OF RECENT WORK
OF ULTRASTRUCTURAL, METABOLIC AND
IMMUNOFLUORESCENT APPROACHES FOR
STUDYING DIFFERENTIATION OF THE CEN-
TRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM UNDER CONTROL
CONDITIONS"
THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1977
SEMINAR: 2:00 p.m., Room 1057-MHRI

with excommunication if he
went through with Wednesday's
planned ordinations. Last year,
after similar ordinations, the
pontiff forbade him to continue
acting as a bishop and priest
because he persisted in using
traditional Latin liturgy outlaw-
ed by the 1962-65 Second Vati-
can Council.
It was not clear whether the
Vatican radio statement sig-
naled an impending formal ex-
communication, the Church's
strictest penalty, or meant that
the Pope already considered
Archbishop Lefebvre to have, in
effect, excommunicated himself
through his actions. The Pope
himself had no immediate com-
ment.
EXCOMMUNICATION cuts off
a Catholic from the rites and
sacraments of the Church.
Four thousand sympathizers
flocked to a tent set in an Al-
pine meadow where the 71-year-
old Archbishop Lefebvre, using
prohibited 16th century Latin
liturgy and wearing his red and
gold mitre, or bishop's cap, or-
dained the new traditionalist
priests and consecrated 16 sub-

deacons.
The new clerici, who in the
eyes of the Vatican are not au-
thorized to practice the ministry,
studied at Archbishop Lefebvre's
traditionalist seminary here.
"TIE HOLY SEA is leading
us away from our Catholic
faith," declared the archbishop,
who also opposes overtures
made to the Communist world
and other churches by Pope
Paul.
"Merdenaries, wolves and
thieves' have invaded the
Church since the Second- Vati-
can Council enunciated its broad
renewal program, he said. "We
will not lend a hand to. them,
we will not collaborate in the
destruction of the Church.
"You are the militant church,"
he told his antireformist follow-
ers. He vowed to continue the
traditionalist movement because
"our future is our. past."
DIRECTLY addressing the
Pope's previous warnings, Arch-
hishop Lefebvre told the con-
gregation, "We are and we want
to remain in full communion
with the Holy Roman Catholic
Church."
Some of his followers have
suggested that if Archbishop
Lefebvre is excommunicated,

the traditionalists should found
a church of their own, formaliz-
ing the first major schism since
the Old Catholics separated from
the Church of Rome after the
promulgation of the papal doc-
trine of infallibility in 1870.
"If the archbishop is excom-
municated, we will consider our-
selves excommunicated too,"
Willi Aellig, a spokesman for
a Swiss traditionalist group, told
a reporter.
AN AMERICAN churchman,
identified as the Rt. Rev. Msgr.
Paul Marceau of Florida, was
among 100 priests here for the
event.
Most of the largely middle-
aged audience was French or
West German. A friend of the
archbishop, Dr. Eric de Saven-
them, president of the aradition-
alist International Una Voce
Federation, said he estimated
that Bishop Lefebvre had "mil-
lions of sympathizers, specifical-
ly in his bid to annul the ban
on the old rites."
If his followers were to be
excommunicated along with
Archbishop Lefebvre, it would
be the first mass excommunica-
tion in the Roman Catholic
Church since Pope Pius XII is-
sued a decree in 1948 excom-
municating all followers of "ath-
eist Marxism."

HAVE A CHECUP
IT CAN SAVE YOUR UIFE.

Congress votes to keep
$12,900 pay increases

WASHINGTON (AP) - Mem-
bers of Congress voted yester-
day to keep their $12,900 sal-
ary increases and to preserve
pay raises for more than 20,-
000 other federal pfficials and
employes.
Ending a controversy that has
raged since the raises went into
effect in March without a vote,
the House defeated 241 to 181
a move to cut off funds for
the pay raises, which brought
congressional pay to $57,500 a
year.
ANOTHER VOTE was possi-
ble, but seemed unlikely to
change the outcome. There was
no indication that the attempt
to short-circuit the raises would
be renewed in the Senate.
The margin of defeat for the
amendment belied predictions
from both sides that the vote
would be extremely close.
The House Democratic lead-
ership, corking to preserve the
raise, had taken strategic steps
to win votes against the repeal
amendment.
JUST A DAY earlier, a vote
was scheduled on a bill to can-
cel a cost-of-living raise con-
gressmen were to receive in
October. The bill, affecting those
who received the March in-
crease, passed easily. It already
had passed the Senate.
The leadership also linked the
proposal repeal of the congres-
sinnal pay raise with the raises
for others involved, including
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No:35-S
Thursday, June 30, 1977
is edited and managed by students
at the OnisersityotfMichigan. News
phone 764-0502. Second class postate
paid at Ann Arbor, Mzichigan 4119.
Pubilaised daily Tuesday throug
Sunday macrning during the Univer-
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Arbor. Miecigan 48109, Subseription
rates: 12 Sept. tsru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

the vice president, Cabinet
members and upper echelons of
the civil service.
Thus, to repeal the congres-
sional raise, members also had
to repeal raises for the others.
Some congressmen said they
were unwilling to do so and
some argued repeal would break
faith with those who left lucra-
tive private employment to join
President Carter's administra-
tion.
SPEAKER THOMAS O'NEILL
and other leaders promised that
members will have an opportu-
nity to vote later on legislation
keeping future pay raises from
becoming effective until after
the congressional election fol-
lowing enactment.
This plan has been pushed by
Rep. Charles Whalen Jr., (R-
Ohio), as a way members could
vote on pay raises and still de-
fend themselves against accu-
sations of conflict of interest.
During debate, supporters of
higher congressional pay accus-
ed the news media of misrepre-
senting the issues. They argued
the increase, only the second in
eight years, did not keep up with
the cost of living or trends in
private industry and that the
importance of serving in Con-
gress required a higher pay lev-
el to attract competent mem-
bers.
O'NEILL SAID the compensa-
tion of top executives in the
biggest corporations average
$420,000 a year while No.2
executives" average $293,700.
Majority Leader Jim Wright,
(D-Tex.), told colleagues "there
is no reason to cower or apolo-
gize for the $57,500 rate set
by the commission" which rec-
ommended the raise.
He said that if congressional
salaries since 1969 had been ad-
justed for cost of living chang-
es, salaries rtow would exceed
$70,000.
The University, along with
Harvard, was the first to an-
nounce degrees in public health
in 1915.

Johnn~y Bench-
During one of my checkups, the doctors found a spot on my
lungs. I thought it might be cancer. So did they.
Luckily, it wasn't. Most people are lucky. Most people
never have cancer.
But those who find they do have cancer are far better off
if their cancer is discovered early. Because use know how to
aure many cancers when use discover them early.
That's why I want you to have a checkup. And keep
having checkups. The rest of your life.
It'll be a lot longer if you do.
Amemca n Cancer SocieIty
SO WruaACOCCV t) y"PBIO *0eAcS APA S&i upt

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