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June 17, 1977 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-06-17

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f ridoy, June 17, 1977

~t HE M1CH KUAN UAILtY

Page Seven

-ridoy, June 17, 1971 1HI:MJCHI(iAN LIALY Page Seven

Financial woes force local film
co-ops to increase ticket prices

(continued from Page1)
Major problems plaguing the
co-ops, which are non-profit or-
ganizations, include rising film
rental prices and high overhead
operating costs. Nightly film
rental prices range from $75
plus 50 per cent of the gate to
$400 plus 50 per cent. Co-ops
must also shell out money for
auditorium rental fees. The Uni-
versity charges $92 a night for
the use of Auditorium A in An-
gell Hall.
The University has not been
very co-operative," added for-
mer Ann Arbor Film Co-op pres-
ident Connie Bosely. "Cinema
II and the Co-op built the' pro-
jection booth (in Auditorium A)
and bought the equipment, but
the University still refuses to
give us (rental) priority some-
times.",
INDIVIDUAL co-ops have
also been hurt by the crowded
local film market.tDuring the
school year, the three groups
show upwards of 20 to 30 films
a week, in addition to the offer-
ings of the eight local com-
mercial theatres.
Buit while the student film

co-ops are faltering, the com-
mercial cinemas are thriving.
"We're having close to a re-
cord year," noted Lloyd Vin-
nick, manager of the State
Theatre. "And there are lots of
hits to come."
Cinema II's Susan Klein
termed the problem "a gutted
market." Last summer, the Ann
Arbor Film Co-op began show-
ing movies every night, often
double bills, and- used several
auditoriums for its weekend
showings.
AND THOUGH the local mov-
ie-goer has wallowed in the ple-
thora of choices, the film co-ops
have been the ones who have
suffered from the expanded
market. "The fall was slow,
early winter was bad, late win-
ter was disastrous, and it
hasn't gotten any better this
spring," Bosely said.
Nevertheless, members stress
the importance of survival of
all three co-ops. "Each group
has its own character," said
Cinema Ii's Klein. "I think it's
important for the community to
be given a choice of films."
During the spring and sum-

mer months, the co-ops must
cope with the usual drop in at-
tendance. "The enrollment of
the University is down, and a
lot of people have jobs at
home," noted Co-op president
Ruhmann. "Our schedule for
the rest of the summer is going
to be 90 per cent commercial.
Foreign and obscure films just
aren't attracting people any-
more."
A year-round decline in at-
tendance has caused co-op lead-
ers to fear that they have lost
touch with local film-goer's
desires. "It's really hard to
tell what this community
wants," Klein said. "We're
really in great need of public
feedback."

WOODSTOCK
Awarded the 1970 Academy Award for
best documentary, this film has outlasted
most of the.'60's culture it covers.'With
irni Hendrix, Crosby, Stills and Nash,
Richie Havens, Arlo Guthrie, the list goes 4
on - . . A perfect film for a summer
evening.
Sun: CASABLANCA
CINEMA GUILD Toniqht at OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00 & 10:15 Admission $1.25
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

MOVIE" Cl
a

MOVES- C NMA ti- MOVEIES

BILLY WILDER'S 1950
SUNSET BOULEVARD
Wilder juxtaposed, verbal wit with a sinister, morally disturbing
envornment, in this film about a silent-screen star hasbeen re-
cluse (Gloria Swanson) who picks up-and keeps-a promising
screenwriter (William Holden). The ending is pure Hollywood
decadence, straight out of Anger's HOLLYWOOD BABYLON.
With Cecil B. Demille, Heddo Hopper, Buster Keaton, and Erich
von Stroheim, in a revealing and pivotal role as Swanson's
"butler."
TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL-AUD. "A"
CINEMA II 7:30/9:30 'Adm.-$1.2s

i
i

ro Ablng time agoin a
gfarw
xy far aw-y,

s"
GIVE A SUPER
SIRIX)IN TO A
SUPER DAD
$3.09 Ponderosa
knows that the way to a
man's heart is through his

No Student Discount, No Posses
. Ioeph E. Levine presents
2 A BRIIDGE 1() FAR
Na Studet Discount, Na Passes

"EXORCIST 11 THE HERETIC"
No Student Discount No Passes

0

AMEI

UJoe
RCam EUpC
FROM MULBERRY SQUARE PROIDUCTIONS
7-r

SUNDAY L1AM TO 9PM

_ __ ..

Aim Arbor-3:354 East WKihiemaw Ave.
Al u rlior-- W. Sidi mo Ilso

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