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June 11, 1977 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-06-11

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Saturday, June 11, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Saudy ue 1 97TE IHGNDIL aeFv

".

Ray escapes Tenn. prison

From Wire Service Reports
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - James
Earl Ray, serving 99 years for
the assassination of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr., escaped yester-
day from Brushy Mountain State
Prison in East Tennessee, offi-
cial said.
Ray was one of six prisoners
who made their way over the
prison wall to freedom, FBI
agent Harold Swanson said in
Knoxville.
"We've talked to prison offi-
cials and we understand he did
escape," Swanson said.
BROOKS PARKER, Gov. Ray
Blanton's press secretary, con-
firm the escape.
"Six prisoners escaped," he
said. "One of them has been re-
captured and five others still are
at large. James Earl Ray is
among them."
Asked how they e s c a p e d,
Parker said, "Over the wall."
RAY WAS sentenced to 99
years on his guilty plea to the
April 4, 1968, assassination of the
civil rights leader, who was gun-
ned down as he stood on the bal-
cony of the Lorraine Motel in
Memphis.
Ray has admitted he pur-
chased the rifle used in the as-
sassination, but claims he did
not fire the shot. He has claimed
he was only part of a conspiracy
to kill King.
The prison is in a rugged,
s p a r se l y populated area, in
Citizens to
advise city
on sewage
treatment
(Continued from Page 3)
"We are very sensitive to
the charge that we are out for
jobs, no matter what," said
Frenza. "We are concerned
about the quality of life of
area residents, and that in-
cludes ecological questions,
too."
THE GROUP PLANS to meet
until expansion of the treatment
facility is completed, sometime
in 1980.
Richard Sayer, superinten-
dent of the city's Department
of Natural Resources, said ex-
pansion plans are "in the pro-
cess of design." Various plans
are being reviewed by DNR in
Lansing.
Sayers said construction on
the expansion of the waste
water treatment plant could
begin as early as August 1L
Photographic
Group Seven
June, -30
opening reception:
June I17-9
souPS
'Tus-Ft-9 -5
Strday 12-5
IRS FLOOR MICHIAN UNIO

which prisoners used to operate
a coal mine.
"YES, WE understand that he
(Ray) did escape but I don't
have any details on it right now
-it just happened," Swanson
said. "We're trying to find out
the details and see if the state
wants assistance under unlawful
flight because he is a state pris-
oner.
"We have offered to help but
I just don't understand the cir-
cumstances right now-like how,
why, what and when. In other
words, we're looking into it right
now."
In Washington, a spokesman
at FBI headquarters said addi-

tional agents were "on the way"
to the prison, located habout 40
miles northwest of Knoxville.
"IT'S A MATTER of getting a
warrant for prison escape," the
spokesman said. "But that's no
problem."
Ray was an escaped convict
from Missouri at the time of the
slaying.
After sentencing and classifi-
cation at the State Prison in
Nashville, Ray was first assign-
ed to Brushy Mountain, set in a
rugged, sparsely populated ru-
ral area. Then in 1972 he was
transferred back to Nashville
when Brushy, Mountain was
closed.

During his first stay at Brus-
hy Mountain, Ray made two un-
successful attempts to escape.
Brushy Mountain was reopen-
ed in 1976 and Ray, at his own
request, was transferred back
to the facility.
As late as a month ago, he
and other maximum security
prisoners were routinely kept in
locked cells and let out only to
shower.
Sketchy r e p o r t s from the
scene identified the captured
convict as Jerry Ward, serving
time for bank robbery.

BOWLI NG,
PIN BALL,
BILLIARDS
AT THE
UNION
OPEN 'TIL 1 AM.
TONIGHT!
Join the Daily
Arts Department

Legislators focus on
state. heroin problem

(Continued from Page 3)
heroin addiction program at an
authorized hospital.
Cushingberry said security
standards for the program
would be "highly more strin-
gent than the current metha-
done programs.
"THE ADDICTS WOULD
only be issued heroin as pre-
scribed by the physician," he
said. "The fix will be adminis-
tered to the addict at the hos-
pital by an authorized nurse."
The other facets of the at-
tack on the state's heroin prob-
lem include a bill to set manda-
ory penalties for those convict-
ed of heroin possession. The
punitive period would be pro-
portional to the amount of her-
oin possessed by the individ-
ual at the time of the arrest.
No mandatory penalties are
now set-by state law for heroin
possession.
The third part of the attack
would allow junkies to enter
a plea of "guilty but addicted"
to charges of heroin possession.

If a judge were to accept such
a plea, the mandatory penalty
would be probation.
THE LEGISLATION IS cur-
rently being debated by the
House Public Health and Ju-
diciary committees.
In 1917, the U. S. passed the
Harrison Act, setting penalties
for the possession of certain il-
licit drugs. That same year,
England started a program sim-
ilar to the one being proposed
in the state House. Cushingber-
ry said since 1917, England has
experienced "virtually no traf-
ficking in heroin as we know it'
in this country."
Cushingberry said the bill
calls for only an experimental
program that would expire au-
tomatically at the end of three
years.
"I think it's a worthwhile
experiment, because it's some-
thing that holds the promise of
dealing simultaneously with two
major social problems: drug
addiction and the vast amount
of crime associated with drugs."

WE'RE
GONNA MAKE
~7 YOU A
And if you don't want to be a star, we'll make you an
expert scene painter, or sound engineer, or makeup
artist, or all of she above.
To be exact, Ann Arbor Civic Theatre will be conducting
workshops this summer in nearly all aspects of theatrical
performance and production, namely:
Dance Costume Desiqn Publicity
Scene Desicn Costume Construction Sound
Scene Construction Makeup Production
Liqhtinq Desiqn Acting Staqe Manaer
Liqhtinq Basics Directing Musical Theater
Properties
The workshops will be given weekly on Saturday morn-
ings and Monday thru Thursday evenings from June 18
thru August 12, 1977, at the AACT building at 201 Mul-
holland Drive, Ann Arbor. A small fee will be charged.
Organizational meetings will be held (at the AACT build-
ing on Saturday, June 11 at11 A.M. for Dance Work-
shops and on Sunday, June 12 at 7:30 P.M. for the
other workshops. For further information call Jim Posante
at 662-4043 for the Dance workshops. For the other
workshops call 426-4729 or 761-9397.
w a
- : Q8- :t. ... -
201.MULHOLLAND DR.
between Liberty and Washinqton, East of Seventh)
BUILDING PHONE: 662-9405

ANN AI0W IILM 4CC-CU
SATURDAY, JUNE 11
THE WAY WE WERE
(Sydnev Pollack, 1973) 7 & 9-MLB 3
Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand sparkle in this irresistibly
romantic ove story. Streisand is a passionately committed cam-
munist, Redford a charismatic jock looking for kicks. They find
each other. A tear-jerker one minute, clever comedy the next, this
is one of the few modern love stories that really works. Streisand
sings the theme song. "Hit entertainment snd memorable enter-
ment."-Pauline Kaei. "Everything a love story should be: a love
story that is a mirror for the wants of many. The casting is in-
eredible."-After Dark.
KINGS OF THE ROAD
(IM LAUF DER ZEIT)
(Wim Wnders 1976) 7:00 only-MLB 4
WisaWonders (ALICE IN THE CITIES) is one o the mos tiltant.
original filmmakers of the "German New Wave," and his KINGS
OF THE ROAD is the most critically acclaimed foreign film of the
past year, winning the Grand Prize at the Chicago Film Festivas
Road' (Rudiger Voicer) traves -Getmany i his van ctpairing
and hreaking baa ofice records across Europe. "The Kingrathe
movie projectors. He picks up "Kamikaze," who has just driven his
vw into the river, and they travel the East German border, raising
heli and reminising aout the women they can't le with or
without and singing American rock sna. German with sbittes.
Ann Arbor Premiere.
THE KING OF HEARTS
(Philippe de Broca, 1967) 10:00 only-MLB 4
Our nmos popuia im. A Scottish soldier during WW I is sent to
a French town, evacuated except tr an asyum. Meanwhie the
fleeing Germans have left a time bomb. The asylum inmates
escape, taking up various costumes and roles. A very funny comedy
and a powerful anti-war film-the sanity of insanity and vice-
versa. Alan Bates, Genevieve Bujold. "Delightfully subtle satire-
penetrating comedy encased in a most beautifufilm."--Judith
Crist.
SUNDAY FILMS ARE
FREE TO THE PUBLIC
SUNDAY, JUNE 12
JOHN FORD FESTIVAL
John Ford haes been exied a get fimamaker "nonparei" by
nut-h diverse diretorsa soBergean, Hawk, Godard Satajit Ry
Tufaut, Who Wnders. Rivette, Waels. ienten. Miius. Foser
Lindsey Andeson ogdasovich. Kurosaws and Renoir. He creted
a body at work unmatched in the history of the cinema. Starting
tonight we are presenting sane of the key wrs in Ford's career.
"I ite mosty he ad masters, meaning John Ford John Ford. and
John Ford"-Orson Weimo.
WAGONMASTER
(John Ford. 1950) 7 only-MLB 4
Ford's persoal favorite among all his Wsterns. A ot-n wagon
train, guided by at-a Johnson is menaced by Indians sd outaws .
ad It maes its way westward through Ford counry to the Promised
Land f Utah. Caled "an avant-garde Wetern" by Lindsay An-
derson WAGOSHASTEREIs a many-eveed mals fabe. "It an be
argued that WAGOMASTER Is John Ford's greatest fim-Andrew
Sarris. "One at the beat Wetern ever produced . -0aimpe.
poetic apotheosisa atFord. It is iovey, lesurey . . . ai beautiu
images and ballads."-Wtiiiam K. Everon.
Plus: Short, BATTLE OF MIDWAY 19421
Ford personaily filmed this, American fist war documentary. and
was wounded in the praceaa, maing him the first director to be
awarded the Academy Award and the Purpie Heart tr the saue im,
FORT APACHE
(John Frd, 1948) 9only-MLB 4
A great cast highigths the first at Ford' aroiy triogy and ase's
Fonda) takes over a cavalry outpost during the Indian wars. His'.
at hisosit popular fulme, A stiff, by-the-ost martinet (Henry
Wet Point maner immediate yciashe with that of natural batte-
tested John Wayne. Quick and ecitnggaso graefui as an oficers
dance and as sweeping aso the onument Vale In whith it was
fulmed. this is Ford t his myth-eporig bet, Ward Bond, Shirey
Tempe, Jo Agar, Victr MLagin. -'--
MONDAY, JUNE 13
NICHOLSON NIGHT I
KING OF MARVIN GARDENS.
(Bob Rofelson. 1972) 7 & l10:30-MLB
It's unfortunate that Nichlsn' most chalenging oe appears
In his leat-viewed film. hut that taes. nothing away ram his off-'.
beat Introverted prtormance in a truly underrated picture. The
acting is powerful (Dervnentary strata the show). tet diretion
faultliess" pethas the reson for the filmas bo-atie falre is its
exsioin of many cherished American myths. At any rate, there
is no rmasn for you to miss it. Jack Nihsn, Hruert-ne,EMien
Bustyn...
DRIVE, HE SAID
(Jack Nicholson. 19711 845 only-ML ,3
Of the rash 9 ollegegtileratocme out of thelta Ais tis wtty
acnaitive im was the only honest one. Typically. i was overlooked.
Its story of a oeealsksetbal star who must' choose between his
apotr ad poitical activismwlli strike homne for any Univrsiy
betisa pring ac tr award fr'intheNtionai ocety of Fira
tadet. Bruce a 's excelet p r mne as tearoass wa the
Critics. Wiliam Tepper, Karen Btai, RstTows.

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