100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 09, 1977 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-06-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thu rsdoy, June 9, 1977

Bryant win fuels other anti-gays

As soon as Miami voters re-
pealed a local law banning dis-
crimination against homosexu-
als, the ripples started to
spread.
With-the victors trumpeting
plans for new battles elsewhere,
leaders of gay groups in the na-
tion's capital, San Antonio. Tex.,
Minneapolis a n d California
found themselves forced to con-
sider their strategy against a
potential offensive.
AND GAY leaders across the
ORGANIZATION OF
ARAB STUDENTS
Is Sponsoring A
PROB RAM FRIDAY
June 10-7:30 p.m.
at, the
INTERNATIONAL
CENTER
Oman Solidarity Night
Prosrom includes
two speokers
Abdallah Soyadi
from OAS
Nihal Saed
from ISA
FILM:
THE HOUR OF
LIBERATION HAS
SOUNDED

country were offering different
predictions about what the new
fights would mean.
Some feared a backlash in
which they would lose newly
won rights. Others said the na-
tional attention stirred by the
fight would be good in the long
run, even if at first there were
setbacks.
The talk of new fights started
in earnest in the first flush of
victory Tuesday night for Anita
Bryant, the singing orange-juice
promoter, fundamentalist Chris-
tian and anti-gay leader in Mi-
ami.
"ALL AMERICA and all the
world will hear what the people
have said," she declared soon
after learning her side was win-
ning by a 2-to-1 margin. Then
she singled out four areas as
places into which her group,
Save Our Children, woull soon
move. An estimated 40 commun-
ities nationwide have gay rights
laws.
Bryant herself was off to a
religious revival last night in
Norfolk. Va. Gay rights leaders,
meeting during the day there in
response, said that despite the
vote totals they had won a moral
victory in Miami because more
people were aware of the de-
bate.
AND IN Miami, homosexual
spokesman Bob Kunst declared
that Bryant had miscalculated.
"Bryant may have tasted
blood at this time, but no way
does she have a chance in those
o t h e r places," Kunst said.
"They are absolutely crazy to
go into Minneapolis. That crdi-

nance has been there for years
. . . In California, the people
won't be nearly as nice as they
were here; the, gay community
is much more organized . . .
The more Bryant does this num-
ber the more there will be a
backlash aaginst Miami,"
In California Robert McQueen,
editor of The Advocate, the na-
tion's largest gay newspaper,.
said "the defeat there makes
our life much more difficult .. .
there has been a trend notice-
able mostly in the state legis-
latures where almost any anti-
gay legislation has won very
good. Pro-gay legislation has
been having a very difficult
time."
IF CALIFORNIA becomes a
battleground, it could be a hot
one. It passed a so-called "Ho-
mosexual Bill of Rights" in 19-
75 that legalizes all sexual acts
in private between consenting
adults and is now considering a
I a w to ban discrimination
against homosexuals.
A number of cities in Califor-
nia also have ordinances simi-
lar to the one nullified in Mi-
ami-including San Francisco,
where an estimated one in seven
of the city's 680 000 residents is
homosexual.
And in recent years, San
Francisco's attitude t a w a r d
gays has been notable for its tol-
erance.
THE CASTRO Street area,
one of two large homosexual
neighborhoods. often resembles
a street fair on sunny weekends
with men in cutoffs strolling
arm in arm and lounging about
restaurants and bars.
It is a well-kept, middle-class
THE MICIIGAN DAILY
Volume LxxXVII, No. 26-S
Thursday, June 9, 1977
iv edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through
Suioday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
tees); $13 hy mali outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.10 in Ann
Arbor, $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

area and gay community lead-
ers say they revatalized it. Last
year Chip Carter appeared at
the annual gay tricycle race to
win votes for his father's presi-
dential. race.
San Francisco Mayor George
Moscone declared yesterday
that the Miami vote "says that
song people have rights and
others do not. I think that is
terribly wrong."
IN MINNEAPOLIS, lawyer
and gay rights activist Jack Ba-
ker agreed with Kunst that a
iBryant campaign would fail
there. "We have been at the
process of education since 1969,"
he said.
Baker estimated about five
per cent of Minnesotans-20 000
persons-are "up front gay,"
and 2,000 are in the gay rights
movement.
But State Sen. Howard Olson,
a farmer who helped defeat a
proposed gay rights bill in the
minnes ot a legislature last
month. said the Florida vote is
encouraging, and reflects public
opinion in his state.
OLSON SAID he expects new
pressure for a law next year
similar to ordinances in effect
in Minneapolis, St. Paul and
Marshall that prohibit discrimi-
nation based on "affectional pre-
ference."
There were 27 complaints filed
tnder the Minneapolis ordinance
in the first two years ater it
was passed in 1974, but because
it is designed to encourage con-

ciliation. few have reacae i the
court stage.
In one case now under appeal,
a hearing examiner ruled that
Big Brothers. Inc., can distri-
bute information about the ao-
fectional preference taf would-be
volunteers, as long as it does so
for all applicants.- The group
provides male companions for
fatherless boys.
THAT CASE reflects fears
about such a law's effects on
children--an argument similar
to Bryant's and to Olson's fear
that a state law could require
hiring of militant homosexual
teachers.
In Washington. gay activists
estimate the homosexual com-
munity numbers about 70,000,
and they say the local 'aw is so
closely linked to black rights-
it is part of an omnibus anti-
discrimination bill-that it would
be difficult to rescind.
Bryant's mention of San An-
tonio was apparently prompted
by an invitation from a Baotist
preacher there, the Rev. Joe
West. A leader of the city's gay
community. Jim Eggeling, said
it was difficult to understand
her reasoning because, while the
city has several gay bars, ef-
forts to obtain a gay rights ordi-
nance have been turned down
cold by city officials.
Eggeling, a former school-
teacher fired after admitting
he was gay. said the city coun-
cil won't even discuss the law
now.

CAN YOU TYPE ???
This summer ...
When the finals are finished
The books packed away
And you find yourself Jobless
When you come home to stay
CONTACT KELLY GIRL FOR TEMPORARY WORK 1I
Variety * Choice of Assignments
Not an Agency - Never a fee
KELLY GIRL
Division of Kelly Servies
BATTLE CREEK - DETROIT - FLINT - LANSING
KALAMAZOO - GRAND RAPIDS - MUSKEGON
an equal opportunity employer - M/F

40

ARE YOU SURE YOU KNOW
WHAT FAMILY PLANNING IS ALL ABOUT?

PART OF A CROWD of 3,000 marchers gather in San Fran-
cisco's Union square late Tuesday night following a march
from the city's gay community in response to repeal in
Miami of homosexual rights ordinance.
SALE y }
DOWN JACKETS, VESTS,
PILLOWS & COMFORTERS
At Rockbottom Prices
Ripstop Jackets
$34.95
Ripstop Vests
$19.95 v
SAVINGS on many more styles
3 8. MAIN
6{65-388

If you think it means preventing
unwanted pregnancy you're
partly right. But it iieans more
than that Like counseling yung
people about how a baby before
they are ready can affect their
health or mess up their lives
helping couples who want to havo
children but can't counseling
men on male responsibility and
methods of birth control.

It's important to know all about
family planning. it means more
than you may have thought
For information or help, contact
the tamily planning clinic in your
community, your local health
department, oryourown physician.
U SDEPARTMENT OFHEALTH
4 EDUCATION. AND WELFARE
. ' Publi Health Servico

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan