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June 08, 1977 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-06-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, June 8, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Wednsda, Jne 8 197 TE MIHIGN DILY ageNin

Council OK's funds.

Local gardeners Dope law

(Continued from Page 1).a
fencing; and installation of
taxiway lights and visual ap-
proach slope indicators.
The vote approving the fund-
ing was six-to-five, yas divided
strictly along party lines, Re-
publicans for and Democrats
against. Several Democrats
claimed that the project was be-
ing improperly funded.
Leslie Morris (D-Third Ward)
read several communications
from present and former city
officials which suggested that
the origipal city expenditure for
construction and additional land
purchases, was intended to be
a loan, not an outright grant.
"THIS COUNCIL has the ob-
ligation to the taxpayer to re-
cover a part of the money put
into the airport in the form of
a loan," said Morris.
Councilman Jamie Keniwor-
thy (D-Fourth Ward) attempt-
ed to amend the resolution to
force the airport facility to re-
pay previous loans from the
city before any further con-.
struction could be undertaken.

COUNCIL defeated a resolu-
tion establishing a Senior Citi-
zens' Advisory Committee that
would have advised the Mayor
and Council on matters and is-,
sues regarding the needs, wel-
fare and objectives of Ann Ar-
bor's elderly population.
The original resolution was
written by Wendell Allen (R-
First Ward). That resolution
was tabled two weeks ago. May-
or Wheeler reworked the reso-
lution and offered it for con-
sideration yesterday morning.
R e p'u b 1 ican s attempted
to amend Wheeler's resolution,
which called for the chairper-
son of the advisory committee
to be appointed by the mayor,
so that the entire council would
appoint the chairperson, thus
giving Republicans control over
the choice, by virture of their
one vote majority on Council.
However the amendment was
defeated.
Council member Louis Belch-
er (R-Fifth Ward) said the re-
solution would be reworded and
reintroduced qt a later date.

D--OIV' Ctssssiflirds

(Continued from Pae 8)
PERSONAL
WEAR A FRAGRANCE daily!! There
are many fine ones to choose from
at the village Apothecary, 1112 S.
Uolv. Ave. c~i-
AVON
SUMMER SALE
June1 1th-TI a.m.-8 p.m.
Call 662-4401 for details
cFtc
WHERE MsARGINAL PRICES buy
uality diamonds-Austin Diamonds.
1209 S. University, 663-7151. oFtc
STARDATE 7706.08:GLC
No Dodge Lounage tooight pee phonr
conversation of yesterday ornig.
The tape I got was just "alright'
out nothing spectacular. You'll like
aoy'way. I'll have to gal home
,-In eforeSaturday, to get thr
le and the Christmas tree (ha
s). curchin. dF608
FREEIN BALL
,vit this coupon at Tomny's or the
o-s Eyed Moose this Thursday and
tFriay. Good for 25c. One coupon
1s rcstomer. eF6lO
U-TO-DATE guide to Ambrosia--
oe Psilocybin Mushroom. $6.00.
Sltrlo-Daze Press, P.O. Box 79, Hale-
ste N.Y. 11743. 75F610
VOLUNTEER STAFF NEEDED to
ork on LS&A course evaluations.
Student Counseling Office, 1018 An-
el Call 763-1552. 12F610
THE PIZZA MACHINE
is at the Cross Eyed Moose.
601 E Liberty. Open every day.
cF616
TH1IS GRAD WOMAN has summer
seetheact aches tscr a laugohing
woodstman 20-351 who loves danc-
1 btiong, and hackpacig. Where
re you. man o' my heart? Please
r plysfully. Michigan Daily, Box 4,
iSRAELI National Basketball Team
is playing the Canadian National
Tran in Windsor Thursday. ,June 9,
9 p.m. For ticket information call
Hillel, 663-3336 during the day cF608
PASSPORT PHOTOS WILL BE
AKEN EVERY MONDAY EvE. AT
330 P.M. Cot is $2.50 for first two
opies and $.30 for each additional
Print. See Schneider at Michigan
Daily, 420 Maynard St. dF609
PREGNANT? Need help?
Call Problem Pregnancy Help. 769-
72t3. Pregnancy tests available. cFtc
AVON'S SUMMER SALE
is June 11th. For free brochure or
information call Audrey Stein at
662-4401 anytime. cFtc
COPIES--As low as 210c. IMPRESS
IStil the Cheapest!}. 524 E. William,
665-4321. cFtc
FRIENDS LAKE COMMUNITY 80-
acre wildlife preserve near Chelsea-
Swimming, sailing. canoeing, pic-
nicking, camping. All-year member-
ship $50 per adpit. Children free.
Brochure from Bloods, 2005 Penn-
craft, Ann Arbor 48103. 43F611
PERMANENT WEIGHT LOSS
Through Be h a v i o r Modification.
Wolverine Institute, 973-1480. cFt

PERSONAL
STEVE'S LUNCH-Come for home
cooking. Breakfast all day, great.
soups and egg rolls. 3 egg omelets
with fresh vegetables and fresh
bean sprouts served all day. Sundays
10-8. 1313 South University. c~tc
GAY GRAD, RENAISSANCE MAN.
Seeks rational companionship and
ts logical consequee. Wite Daily
Box 21. 59F610
26 YEAR OLD projtct manager, non-
drinker, Christian, marriage minded,
monthly income $1600. Like to meet
an attractive girl 5'7" & up. Send
letter & photo to 15488 Scotty 302.
Taylor, MI 48180. 67F615
XEROX AND OFFSET
fast, low cast duplicating
COPY QUICK
1217 S. University 769-0560
- erte
DISSERTATION
SPECIAL
LOWEST PRICE
IN TOWN FOR
COLLATED COPIES
RACKHAM QUALITY
GUARANTEED
COPYQU ICK
1217 S. University, 769-0560
crtc

get room
(Continued from Page 1)
ed in the spring," and is imme-
diately ready for planting.
"Most people plant kitchen
vegetables," he explains. "This
includes lettuce, tomatoes, car-
rots, cucumbers .- .
"There are also perennial
plots, which are not plowed in
the fall, where people can plant
things like strawberries and
melons.
"WE HAVE a tremendous
cross-section -of p e o p1l e," he
claims. "We have high income
people, old people. There's old-
people, low i n c o m e people,
young p e o p le, old people.
There's old-time gardeners and
people during it for the first
time.".
"This is my first year," said
Linda Koski, who gardens at
the Peace Neighborhood Center,
one of Project Grow's largest
areas of land.
"It's real nice," she added,
"but t don't know what I am
doing."
Most of the plots at the Cen-
ter are teeming with life, but
Koski's is almost barren. "I'm
a little late," she said.Pointing
to a tinysprout, she asked hope-
fully, "See my tomato plant;?
I have tomatoes, peppers, and
I'm trying some celery.
"PEOPLE ARE pretty friend-
ly," Koski said. "You see some-
body around, and they will tell
you what to do and give you
ideas."
For those who think maintain-
ing a garden is too much work,
consider this man who grows
for Lurie Terrace, a senior cit-
izens housing project.
"This man is 90 years old and
has three plots of land he farms
on," Nicholls said. "This is
equivalent to about 2,000 square
feet. A lot of people out there
PINBALL
BOWLING
BILLIARDS
at the
UNION
Open 1 1 AM1v.

o grow
have arthritis and can't grow
themselves," Nicholls added.
"So, he grows for the people who
can't come out, and takes others
out there to grow."
Project Grow operates out of
the 'County Park Commission
Office. All its land is donated.
THE IDEA of using donated
land to garden on was initiated
by a group from the Ann Arbor
community in the early 1970's.
"People had a desire to gar-
den so they found donors and
took the land," explains Nic-
holls. The idea became more
popular, and Project Grow was
founded in 1972 to meet the in-
creased demand.
But the project. also has .its
problems.
"It is hard to get the-city to,
realize that gardening is recrea-
tion like any other," Nicholls
said of the city's negative re-
sponse to their request for sub-
sidy.
"In this country it hasn't been
seen as part of Parks and Rec-
reation. It's not a softball
team."

+('() ttlst'ted from Page 1)
io~tximW~m penalty sat one year
in ctocnty rill and $1,000 in fine
tr bath for possession of mari-
Jai. The law also provides
flur veX'S imprisonment and
$2,000 in fi eto for sales, and 90
days in -tnty jail and a $100
fine for nse.
The coirt also called for a
legisla-ive review of penalties
for possesion of small amounts
of marijuana, adding its influ-
ential voice to a decriminaliza-
tion movement in the state
House.
In an even more forceful
opinion, Justice Thomas Burns,
a member of the three judge
appeals. court panel stated,
"Marijuana use should not be
a criminal problem. The cost of
making it such are just too
great. The waste of time, mon-
ey and other resources of the
oriminal justice system on en-
forcement of, marijuana laws.
cOn no longer be justjfie"
Bara Olanki, a town in the
Fyzabad division of Uttar Pra-
desh, India, is an important
handloom center. The town, lo-
cated 15 -miles from Lucknow,
is contiguous with the town of
Nawabganj.

STARTS TOMORROW!-
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ALL SEATS RESERVED at $3.00-Children $2.50
June 9, 10, 16, 17--7 P.M.
Sat., June 11-11 A.M., 3 and 7 P.M.
Sun., Jane12-2 and 7 P.M.
Sun., June 19-11 A.M., 3 and 7 P.M.
Tickets ot Lydin Mendelssohn, 763-1085 or 995-2073

ONE THING AT the University of Michigan
you don't have to wait in line for .. .
DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR
CALL 764-0558 TO SUBSCRIBE

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