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June 04, 1977 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-06-04

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Saturday, June 4, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Moluccans pick mediators

ASSEN, The Netherlands (')
- Dutch officials and South
Moluccan extremists chose a
Moluccan doctor and the widow
of a guerrilla leader yesterday
to help end the 11-day twin
sieges in northern Holland.
Toos Faber of the Justice
Ministry said Dr. Hassan Tan
and Chris Suomokil, who help-
ed negotiate an end to a Mo-
luccan train hijacking in 1975,
would begin formal contacts to-
day with the seven to 10 gun-
men holding at least 55 host-
ages on a train near Assen.
ANOTHER F OURof
of the Asian militants were
holding three teachers and a
principal at a village school in
Bovensmidle, about 10 miles
south of the train. Last week
they released 105 children and

a teacher from the school after
about half of them developed
stomach pains.
The leader of the two terror-
ist groups was believed to be
on the train, officials said.
Four terrorists emerged from
the train briefly yesterday and
planted a Moluccan flag - ver-
tical stripes of red, green,
white and blue - on the front
of the engine.%
ASKED what restrictions had
been placed on the mediators,
Faber replied, "They are al-
lowed in their contacts to see
in what way they could be of
any assistance in ending this
case."
Premier Joop den Uyl told
reporters in The Hague, the na-
tional capital, that the situa-
tion in the north remained

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13

Turks to choose between
East and West at polls

:serious" and that the govern-
nent considered the hostages
the "first concern."
He said the government had
already turned its attention to
the siege's effect on relations
between the Dutch and the
'ountry's 40,000 South Moluc-
can immigrants. He did not
elaborate.
EARLIER this week, the
South Moluccans, who grabbed
the hostages in coordinated
raids May 23, rejected two, pos-
ible mediators offered by the
Dutch. The Dutch then turned
down two the terrorists pro-
posed.
Agreement on the mediators
followed a meeting in The
Hague between Dutch officials
and a delegation of Moluccans
in The Netherlands.
The terrorists are seeking in-
Photographic
Group Seven
June 1--30
opening reception:
June 1, 7-9
Saturday 12-5
NQGR
FIRST FLO00R MICHIGAN UNION

dependence from Indonesia for
their Pacific island homeland in
the former Dutch East Indies.
COUMOKIL'S husband was
the first president of the Mo-
luccans' exile government here
and was executed by the Indo-
nesians for guerrilla activity in
1966, officials said. Tan is a
former minister of social and
youth affairs in the exile gov-
ernment.
The terrorists announced af-

TONIGHT!_r
ALL STUDENT SEATS RESERVED AT $2.00
A very humorous and touching evening.
AIR CONDITIONED
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater
June 2, 3, 4-8 pm
A Thousand Clowns
BOX OFFICE 763-1085

ter taking the hostages that
they would not deal with media-
tors and warned "if they should
nevertheless appear, the dead
will start to fall." But three
days ago, they asked for third-
party help in ending the siege.
The terrorists have dropped
previous demands that some of
the hostages and 21 South Mo-
liccans jailed in The Nether-
lands for previous terrorist ac-
tivity he flown with them out
of the country.

ANKARA, Turkey MA)- In
elections tomorrow, Turkish
voters will determine if their
strategically situated country
will take a turn to the left -
with closer ties to the neigh-
boring Soviet Union - or re-
main in the hands of a pro-
Western conservative coalition.
The race pits former Premier
Bulent Ecevit, the "hero" of
the 1974 Cyprus invasion and an
advocate of Scandinavian - style
social democracy, and Suley-
man Demirel, whose conserva-
tive Justice party heads a loose
four-party coalition.
ECEVIT HOLDS a wide edge
in press polls and his Repub-
lican People's party is the only
one given a chance to win a
majority in the 450-seat Na-
tional Assembly. It presently
has 190 seats, while Demirel's
coalition has 222.
Turkey's next premier will
have to make decisions that will
vitally affect United States
and European security, and the
Balkans area. Domestically, he
will be faced with runaway 25
per cent inflation, 13 per cent
unemployment and low foreign
reserves of around $65 million
- enough to cover only two
months of the country's needs,
according to local economists.
Although foreign policy has
not loomed as an election is-
sue, Turkey's new government
must decide whether it will in-
definitely close the two dozen
U. S. intelligence gathering
bases shut down in 1975 over an
arms embargo dispute with
Washington over the Turkish in-
vasion of Cyprus. He must also
decide if Turkey's 500,000-man
armed forces will remain an ac-
tive part of the North Atlantic

Treaty Organization - NATO
- or drift toward greater ties
with the Soviet Union and na-
tions which, like Turkey, are
predominately Moslem.
T U R K E Y guards NATO's
eastern flank and controls the
Dardanelles, the Turkish strait
that links the Black Sea and
the Mediterranean, and pro-
vides the Soviet Union its only
southern sea outlet.
The two year old Demirel
government has been unable to
make progress with Greece, its
neighbor across the Aegean
Sea, in negotiations on air
space rights, continental shelf
rights and the Cyprus dispute.
It is reconsidering its associate
membership in the European
Common Market.
Although eight parties seek
ballots of about 20 million Turks
of voting age, only Demirel or
Ecevit is given a chance for
the premiership.
sui twem5

INGMAR BERGMAN'S 1972
C
iE

Four women undergo an inclusive examination which probes and
dissects their lives-exposing all their passions, anxieties, frus-
trations and insecurities. Bergman confronts the depths of the
feminine psyche with amazing sensitivity and uses color in a
symbollically expressive way. Starring Harriet Anderson, Liv Ull-
man, Ingrid Thulin and Karen Sywan.

1
1

SUNDAY FREE SHOWING
THINGS TO COME (1936 Science-Fiction) at 8

CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT
7:30 & 9:30

OLD ARCH,
Admission

AUD.
$1.25
1975

JOSEPH LOSEY
THE ROMANTIC
ENGLISH WOMAN

I

Michael Caine stars as a bourgeois pulp writer whose imagination
pushes his discontented wife (Glenda Jackson) and their gigolo
house guest (Helmut Berger) together, thus providing material
for his most recent novel. Screenplay by Tom Stoppard.
CINEMA .1 TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL-Aud. "A"
7:30 & 9:30 Admo. $1.25

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