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May 28, 1977 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Housing-
(Continued from Page 9i
but we can't raise rents anv-
more. Our margin has eroded
and eroded.
INCREASED city property tax
assessments are most fre-
quently blamed by landlords
for the rising costs of existing
housing. And according to fig-
ures from the city Assessor's
office and City Planning dept.
their complaints are not com-
pletely unwarranted. While
residents in city's the size of
Ann Arbor normally contribute
between 30-40 per cent of a
city's total property tax reve-
nues, residential property tax-
es here currently make up a
whopping 74 per cent of the
city's property tax revenues. In
addition while reassessments
on residential properties are in-
creasing in value -10 per cent
SALE
DOWN JACKETS. VESTS
PILLOWS & COMFORTERS
At Rockbottom Prices
Ripstop Jackets
$34.95
Ripstop Vests
$19.95
SAVINGS on many more styles

yearly, commercial and indus-
trial valuations have remained
steady. City residents are thus
assuming an ever increasing
burden -of property taxes rela-
tive to commerce and industry.
If Ann Arbor residents are
paying more than their equit-
able share of taxes, it is quick-
ly apparent who is getting off
cheaper. Occupying an estimat-
er 50-60 per cent of the city's
total property, the University of
Michigan stands tax exempt.
Students may feel doubly in-
censed with the 'U'. For in ad-
dition to being a major cause
of high city property taxes and
thus high rental prices, the
University has consistently re-
fused to make use of its public
status to garner low interest
loans from the federal govern-
ment and build more student
housing during this shortage.
At the same time, because
city hall cannot right now mus-
cle the University into giving
it anre nn- In- rA-

contend that they instead have
come to depend on spiralling
residential property assess-
ments to finance the costs of
city government in recent
years.
One landlord calls city as-
sessment practices one of the
two things which stemmed the
citys housing boom in the
1960's. "It's a constant fight
with the city assessor on as-
sessed valuation. Ann Arbor is
notorious for too high evalua-
tions on certain buildings."
Adds another landlord. "I
University facts
Among American colleges and
universities, the University was
the first to establish a profes-
sorship in zoology and botany
in 1842.
Each year, some 20,000 vis-
itors come to the University's
Kelsey Museum of Ancient and
Medieval Archaeology.

think the rents in Ann Arbor
are a terrible outrageous rip-
off. Even though the city gives
a lot of lip service to rent con-
trol they really love it (the
present situation) because they
can get $1600 out of an old
rattleheap (for taxes) where in
Flint they'd only get about
$80.'
According to this landlord,
city assessment practices per-
petuate a vicious rent circle.
Assessments, when they are
based not on the real value of
an individual's property but on
the rental income derived from
comparable properties around
the city, tend to force rents up
incrementally with each new
assessment. The higher rents
in turn force some property
values up, which again trigger
another rise in assessments.
The landlord recalled one par-
ticularly irritating examplepof
this principle:
"If you ask them they'll deny
it. But I had one house where
I was charging less than the

Saturday, May 28, 1977
going rent. When my taxes
came out to more than 20 per
cent of my gross rent, I went
and complained, and the as-
sessor told me everyone else
was charging more money and
I should adjust my rents up-
wards."
Next week --a discussion
of some of the proposed solu-
tions to the housing shortage,
University facts
The University employs more
women as engineers and scient-
ists than any other American
university.
The University employed 2399
instructional staff members and
11,722 non-instructional s t A f f
members during 1976-77.
Some 25 miles of corridors
run through and connect various
buildings on the University's
Medical Center.

C/ic w'cA 1iv'4ip. envce4

ST. MARY STUDENT
CHAPEL (Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-5 p.m.
Sunday - 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., non, and 5 p.m.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Service at 10:00 a.m.

213 S. MAIN ST.
66-3886
Open 10 til 5:30 p.m.

0.N n the mn d wt
MAXI power
You'll get fash results from a' Daily classified ad and now
you can place it by mail. Just fill out the coupon below
and enclose your check for $3.70. Checks are payable to
the Michigan Daily and no ads will be accepted -without
payments. Your ad will run in the next 3 issues following
receipt of your ad. Call 764-0557 if you have any ques-
tions,
SEND TO: Classifieds, Michigan Daily
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the
Ann Arbor Y, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
FIRST CHURCH OF CIRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2
years.
Midweek Informal Worship.
Reading Room-306 E. Liber-
ty, 10 -5 Monday - Saturday;
closed Sundays.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN .
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday Morning Worship at
9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Student Coffe Hour-12:00.
CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
Reformed Church
Ministry of the Christian
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Welcome all students!
10:00 a m-Morning Worship.
6:00 p,.m. - Communion Serv-
ice.
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
502 E. Huron-663-9376
Ronald E. Cary, Minister
Worship - 10 a.m.; B i b I
School-11 .a.m.
you
t see
news
happen
- call
7-UL

ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF
CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of U of M
Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday 9:30
a.m.; Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship -Sunday, 10:30 a.m
and 6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-
9928.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith,
Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a~m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10
a.m. First Baptist Church.
Bible Study-11 a.m.
Fellowship Meeting Tiesdiy
at 7:30 p.m.
FIRST UNITED METIIODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemun
Worship Services at 9:00 ani
11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Schomaker,
Chaplain/Director
10 am.--Morning Worshtit.
5:30 p.m. - Celebration/ e-
lowship.
6:15 p.m.-Shared Meal, 75c.
Extensive programming for
undergrads and grad students.
Stop in or call 668-6881 for in-
formation.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-945 am.
:Morning Worship--11:04 a.m
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
s* *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave. 663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Morning Worship at
9:30.
Sunday Bible Study at 10:45.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers t
9:30 a.m. - Classes for alt
ages.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship
5:00 p.m.-Co-op Supper.
6:00 p.m.-Informal Evening
Service.

amPlease indicate
" A where thisad is to run:
SAddress--- -
Phone No nferson'
- for rent
mline ...forsated
line 2 .-, roommates
* a . etc.
lin
" There are five words per line.
" Each group of characters counts as one word.
" Hyphenated words over 5 characters counts as two words
(this includes phone numbers)

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