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May 27, 1977 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-05-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page fx . rc M iu-ilUAN DAILY
Try 'U emergency Locals oppose townhouse
(continued from Page 3) graphic charts show that the
income and minority residents area has less than five per cent
moving into the area," the of its residences . listed as

rriaay, May 27, 197)
development

(Continued from Page 3)
loan request and have the form
approved at the financial aid
office in the Student Activities
Building. The money can be
picked up the next day at the
cashier's office in the LSA
Building lohhy.
Emergency loans are granted
in amounts ranging from $25-
$100 and must be used for edu-
cationally - related expenses.
Loans must be repaid within
three months at a three per
cent interest rate.
IF $100 isn't sufficient, the
University also offers short-
term loans of up to $500. Stu-
dents requesting these loans
must make an appointment with
a financial aid counselor. Short-
term loans are repayable with-

in 12 months with three per.
cent interest.
Should any problems arise
with repayment of an emergen-
cy loan, the student will re-
ceive a hold credit, jeopardiz-
ing future registration, grades
and transcripts.
Because such loans are grant-
ed with the understanding that
the money must be paid back
within three months, the Uni-
versity will not take into ac-
count any extenuating circum-
stances.
Apparently there are quite a
few students in need of extra
cash. A financial aid spokes-
person reports the office re-
ceives about five emergency
loan requests and 20 short-term
loan inquiries each day.

sourcesasid. -It's just a gut feel-
ing that I have."
In order for MSHDA to grant
subsidies, with money obtained
for the Department of Housing
and Urban Developmen\ at
least 15 per cent of the residents
must make less than 80 per cent
of the area's median income.
An income census tract for the
area shows that current resi-
dents make at least 90 per cent
of the median income of all Ann
Arbor residents. Other demo-

"assisted housing units." The
area's population is less than
seven per cent black and less
than live per cent elderly.
BALANCED against the resi-
*dents. claims is an argument of-
fered by Dayton Benjamin, the,
executive director of the Wash-
tenaw County Council on Aging.
Benjamin says Ann Arbor has
an acute shortage of housing fa-
cilities for the elderly.
"We have an information desk

Havin' A Wild Weekend?

south state HELD OVER-
STA E x+ 2nd HIT. WEEK
SHOWS TONIGHT AT
The'atre Ph - 4 7:00 & 9:00 OPEN 6:45
FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STING LIKE A BEE
IF YOU LIKED ROCKY, YOU'LL LOVE ALI!
Loudmouth
...THE, MAN Tb
4r>
P A COLUMBIA/EMI eawe
S c

(Continued from Page 5)
Beauties. Both these are in the
MLB auditoriums at, 7 and 9.
Cinema 2 is showing Kurosa-
wa's Dodes' Ka Den in Angell
Aud A., 7:30 and 10.
Saturday, Cinema Guild is
offering a rare chance to see
the uncut version of the 1933
King Kong. The Ann Arbor film
co-op presents the second night
of the Roger Carmen festival,
with showings of Gasss, Wild
Angels, and Von Richtoffen and
Brown. Like all Corman efforts,
they promise to be cheesey, but

entertaining (MLB 4). The
film co-op is also screening
Blazing Saddles, starring Mel
"subtlety" Brooks. Cinema 2
offers Alain Tanner's Middle of
the World Aud. A, 7:30 %nd
9:30.
Sunday night, it's Renoir's
classic Grande Illusion at the
old A & D building, with no ad-
mission charge. The Ann Arbor
film co-op features two Hitch-
cock classics, Spellbound, and
Under Capricorn, MLB 3, 7
and 9 respectively.

,.ON OUR
lET. diAgONA[
COLOR T.VY.SCREEN

set up at the Social Security of.
fice," said Benjamin, "and the
problem mentioned most fre-
quently is the lack of housing
for the elderly."
Benjamin said that Lurie Ter-
race, a senior citizens' apart-
ment complex on East Huron
was taking names of prospec-
tive tenants seven years in ad-
vance of their retirement.
Final action on the proposed
rezoning is scheduled for June
6 but may be postponed pending
the compilation of figures on the
need for housing for the elderly
and low income groups in An
Arbor.
Doctor
affirms VA
druggings
(Continued from Page )
Hill then told the jury how she
reversed the drug's effects on
the three patients, Bennie
Blaine,John McCrery, and Wil-
liam Loesch u s i n g antidote
drugs.
Hill first performed the re-
versal procedure on Blane, the
46-year-old veteran who was the
first patient to stop breathing.
Using the drugs, Hill said
Blaine "was alert in about ten
minutes"
When she got to McCrery, a
heart patient who stopped
breathing during 'efforts to re-
vive Blaine, Hill found his con-
dition "exactly the same," and
was able to revive him using
the same technique she had
ue/nBlane.
The third patient, William
Loesch, a 29-year-old Vietnam
veteran, had stopped breathing
during efforts to revive Mc-
Crery. Dr. Hill described Loesch
as "very well paralyzed" when
she reached him, and said that
it was too early to administer
reversal drugs at thattime.
Hill says she sat down in the
lounge while w a i t i n g until
Loesch's paralysis could be re-
versed. "I was very shaken,"
she said. 'I was very upset."
After about ten minutes Hill
reversedtLoesch indthe same
manner that she had reversed
Blaine and McCrery.
Hill said she was called to
help still a fourth patient that
night, but was then told the
patient was already dead. That
patient was Joseph Brown.
Hill told the jury she was so
shaken by the events of last
summer that she had-requested
as early as August 13 that a
committee be convened to in-
quire about the rash of poison-
ings. After August 15, Hill said
it was too late for a committee.
"An investigation had to be
launched," she said.
The FBI was called in on
Asigust 15.
Also testifying yesterday was
FBI SpecialAgent Roger Aaron,
a chemist and toxicologist who
was able to find Pavulon in the
exhumed body of Joseph Brown
a year after the patient was
dead.
Just a few days after Brown
died, the Poison Laboratory of
Denver, Colorado had been un-
able to detect any Pavulon in
his body.
After explaining to the jury
his unique and complex method
of finding Pavulon in human
tissue, Aaron told the jury
"(Pavu.lon is definitely present
in Mr. Brown's tissue."

I I i II it
r
t

HELD OVER-
2nd BIG WEEK
TONIGHT AT 7:00 & 9:00
OPEN 6:45

HELD OVER-
3rd DELIGHTFUL WEEK
SHOWS TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:00
OPEN 6:45
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE!
BEST FOREIGN FILM
BEST ACTRESS
MARIE-CHRISTINE BARRAULT
BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
-
v
ALBERT SCHWARTa 0M E. JROSENTHAL
PRE ~oJ NT lrssaes
A FILM BY !EAN CHAART ES TACCt C. LA
Sr ARRIG MAF . RI i BARU T TOP LANG IX - MA RE f'rANCF PSIf
GUY MARCHAND OGamo e siP mpoe a-Noriti Film Dsot Lid
" ~ fU f a~t='am# Est

George C. Scott
A Frnklin J. Schoffner Fikn
"Islands in the Strea m"f
A Bort/Polevsky Production
David Hemvnings GIlbert Roland
and Claire Bloom
tiErnest erningwoy a.ooDennwBDort Petitderf
Peter Bort and Max Polevsky o,.,aFronklInJ. .dcoffner

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