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May 24, 1977 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Pace Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, May 24, 1977

....
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Thare Phne 452-4264
TONIGHT AT 7:00 & 9:00
MUHAMMAD ALl in
A COL M8IA/EMI
TONIGHT AT 7:00 & 9:00
TONIGHT AT 7.00 & 9.00

Carter discusses environment

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a
special message to Congress,
President Carter insisted yester-
day that the nation can take
s'rong action to protect the en-
vironment without endangering
the economy.
To underscore his commit-
ment, Carter directed federal
agencies to discourage construc-
tion and development in flood-
plains and wetlands. The Presi-
dent said this would avoid both
environmental damage and eco-
nomic losses.
CARTER'S 36-page environ-
mental message offered few new
policy departures. But he an-
nounced or proposed several
steps "to build upon Congress'
admirable record" by expand-
ing and strengthening present
environmental programs.
Carter showed no inclination

to back down from the nation's
existing air and water qualify
goals in the face of industry
complaints that they are htoo
costly and may hamper econom-
ic and energy production.
"I believe environmental pro-
tection is consistent with a sound
economy," Carter declared.
ENVIRONMENTAL measures
"like energy conservation, re-
clamation of stripmined lands
and rehabilitation of our cities"
will produce new jobs, he add-
ed. 1
Carter reaffirmed his support
of Clean Air Act amendments
to protect existing high-quality
air regions, to apply "best avail-
able pollution controls to new
facilities and to limit automobile
emissions.
Carter's new actions included:
S *Executive orders for fed-

eral agencies to refuse support
for, development. projects in
floodplains or wetlands unless
there is no practical alternative.
0 An executive order to close
selected public lands to the use
of off-road vehicles such as
snowmobiles and dune buggies
where they can cause serious en-
vironmental damage.
* Recommendations to estab-
lish five new National Park Wil-
derness areas and expand five
others; to establish eight new
Wild and Scenic River segments
and study 20 more possible
areas, and to establish three
new National Scenic Trails and
create a new category of His-
toric Trails.

0 A proposal to terminate au-
thoritation of the Cross Florida
Barge Canal, partly constructed
since its authorization in
1942, but halted by former Pres-
ident Richard M. Nixon in 1971
because of its environmental im-
pacts.
* An executive order to re-
strict imports of "exotic" plant
and animal species into the
United States.
* A directive to the secre-
taries of commerce and state
to ban whaling within the United
States' 200-mile offshore fishing
zone, coupled with continued
U.S. efforts to achieve interna-
tional protection of whales.

* THIS WEEK !
SMAY 26 MAY 27 MAY 28 MAY 29
8 P.M. 8 P.M. 8 P.M. 7 P.M.
$3.50 $4,00 $4.00 $3.50
*"Love, L aughter, and Heartbreak
Black America"
*-Alice Childress' Adulco
Award Winning Play LYI EDLSH
*SPECIAL: 50c aft any Ticket to, Stodents and Seniot Citioens
- -.$1 .00 ofH Total Cost it Tickets ate Purchased tor Alt 3
* hoe's. Tickets: Lydia Me 'elsh.chni, Tix/Iisf at Jseciison's
'I"J Shis (Tses.-Sst. 11-3i, Liberty Miusic Shop.
" ......................0.e-e

i Prese
Islands'
in the
Stream"
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NAczar promises
'back to guns' policy
CI'NCINNATI (AP) -- The new leaders of the National Rifle
Association plan to cut down conservation and wildlife programs
developed to quiet critics and will direct the organization's ef-
forts toward one goal - the battle against gun control.
Harlon Carter, a past president of the association and for-
mer head of the U.S. Border Patrol, was elected" Sunday to
ERA's top paid staff post, executive vice president.
HE- REPLACES MAJ. GEN. MAXWELL RICH, ousted along
with three other top officers in what Rich called a "coup" dur-
ing a marathon weekend session of the 1.2 million-member NRA's
annual meeting here.
Carter's mandate is to return the organization to the front
line of the battle for preservation of the "constitutional right to
keep and bear arms," a cause to which the NRA in the past
has dedicated a considerable lobbying effort in Washington.
"People who are interested in conservation can join the
Sierra Club," said one Carter supporter. "If they're interested
in bird-watching there's the Audubon Society. But this organi-
zation is for people who want to own and shoot guns."
A COALITION OF DISSIDENTS, the Federation for NRA,
engineered the Carter victorsy. The dissidents, who accused the
organization of going soft on gun control under Rich's direction,
urged life members known to support their position to attend
the meeting. Only life members are allowed to vote an annual
membeeship meetings.
"It was a coup," said Rich afterward. "It was fully orchestra-
ted. They used lists of life members to get the right ones to
come to the meeting and vote the way they wanted."
Neal Knox, publisher of Handloader and Rifle magazines and
a coalition leader, criticized the development of NRA's 37,000-
acre National Outdoor Center at Raton, N.M., established for
shooting, hunting and conservation projects, as detrimental to
anti-gun control efforts.
IN ORDER TO RAISE MONEY to develop the center and
for planned new national headquarters at Colorado Springs, Colo.,
NRA officials were easing off on the gun control issue to attract
funds from the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, Knox argued.
And Robert Kukla, director of the NRA's lobbying arm, the
Institute for Legislative Action, said Rich and other NRA officials
had interfered with his operations.
Carter, Kukla's predecessor in the 'institute, promised to
stretch "a protective wing" over the lobbying agency.
And he said there would be "no more civil war in the
National Rifle Association", under his leadership.
"You said you wanted the NRA to pursue the objectives
. of the membership ... and that's what's going to happen,"
he told a cheering crowd of life members Sunday after they
voted not to move from Washington to Colorado 'Springs and
to halt development at Raton for at least a year.
'You want to keep a strong Institute for Legislative Ac-
tion. You shall have it," Carter vowed.
ANN AIIAIV11 1U4dCID-CCU
TUESDAY, MAY 24
THE MUSIC LOVERS
(Ken gussell) 7:00 ONLY-AUD. A
Richard Chamberlain and Glenda Jackson star in s hauntinq
tale nbout the private life of the composer Tchoikovskv.
MAHLER -
(Ken Russell) 9:00 ONLY-AUD. A
From the director of WOMEN IN LOVE, o stylized look at the
life 'f the composer Mahler. Beautiful music and photographv.

MMONMOW nmn M --

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{ -
310 MAYNARD
- price on beer
Tuesday 741 P.M.
-2 price on all
Wednesday drinks 7-10 P.M.
Friday 15c hot dogs
2-5 P.M.
NO COVER
310 MAYNARD

I -- . . --- I - " ', I ol, - 0 1- - I

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