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May 13, 1977 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-05-13

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Friday, May 13, 1977

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Ford Motor to stay in S. Africa

By KEITH B. RICHBURG
A proposal before the stock-
holders of the Ford Motor Com-
pany to end the giant automak-
ers expansion in White-ruled
South Africa went down to an
overwhelming defeat yesterday.
A statement of support for the
proposal issued Wednesday by
a group of Stanford University
students apparently had little
effect on the vote. Stanford
owns 93,350 shares of Ford
stock.
The proposal called on the
Ford Motor Company to "cease
further investment in the Re-
public of South Africa" and
"terminate its present opera-
tions there" until that country
abandoned its policy of "the
legally enforced form of racism
called apartheid."
TIMOTHY SMITH, a proxy-
holder from New York, con-
fronted Ford hoard chairman
Henry Ford II with a statement
from the Stanford Committee
for a Responsible Investment
Policy (SCRIP) - the Stan-
ford student group.
"There has been a great deal
of ferment at Stanford Univer-
sity," Smith said. "Over 3010
students, faculty, staff and
alumni have urged the board of
trustees to vote yes on this
proposal."
Referring to a protest at the
college last Tuesday which led
to 294 arrests, Smith said, "a
far greater evil is created by
Ford's presence in South Af-
rica. "

had recommended a vote
against the proposal, introduc-
ed by the American Baptist
Home Mission Society, The
United Presbyterian Church and
the United Christian Missionary
Society. In justifying their posi-
tion, the company said: "Ford
believes that it has done and
can do more to advance the
cause of racial equality . . by
remaining in South Africa to
provide jobs and ameliorate
conditions than by terminating
operations and turning its back
on its employes there."
In the official results of the
voting, the piroposal was de-
feated 98 per cent to a scant
2 per cent.
A SCRIP spokesperson said
earlier if the proposal got 10
per cent of the votes it would be
See FORD, Page 14
olicetdifer
shot?
By EILEEN DALEY
A 29-year-old man was ar-
raigned yesterday and charged
with felonious assault for al-
legedly beating an employe of
the Downtown Club following an
argutment.
Arrested was Alfred Canada,
a resident uof the swntown
Club, a boarding house located
at 110 N. Fourth Ave.
THE VICTIM, 41-year-old Wil-
liam Bristol, also a resident of
the club, claims Canada shot
him. Police, however, say Bris-
tol was not shot.
According to Ann Arbor Police
Lt. Richard Hill, an argument
between the two men broke out
when Bristol, a part-time secur-
ity guard at the residence, ques-
tioned Canada about having vis-
itors in his room-a violation of
See POLICE, Page 14

Ford Motor Company Board Chairman Henry Ford II shuffles papers before calling to order the

company's annual stockholders meeting where shareholders voted overwhelmingly to continue the
automaker's operations in white-ruled South Africa. FORD'S BOARD OF Directors
What counselor can't cop, con can
By KEITH B. RICHBURG information can, by rules of the court, re- it's in litigation," a Bureau spokesman

The attorneys defending two Veteran's
Administration (VA) Hospital nurses would
like to have a copy of the FBI official man-
ual. The Bureau, on the other hand, takes
great umbrage to having its privileged
information made public. The defense at-
torneys, responding in kind, subpoenaed
the manual. The FBI, however, said 4'no."
Thus the matter was thrown into court,
with defense attorneys confident that the
FBI would be forced to honor the subpoena
and with the FBI certain that top secret

main top secret.
SO THE BATTLE lines were drawn and
the two sides seemed in hopeless deadlock
until an inmate in Marion, Illinois threw a
monkey wrench into the machinery of jus-
tice.
The unidentified inmate requested, and
received, his own copy of the FBI official
manual under the Freedom of Information
Act. The defense now believes that its
side has the edge, and the FBI isn't com-
menting.
"I don't have any comment except that

said. He did add, however, that it is not up
to the FBI whether or not to honor the
subpoena. "It's up to the Justice Depart-
ment," he said.
DEFENSE ATTORNEY Michael Moran
feels more strongly. "Their willingness to
release it (the manual) shows that they
don't consider it privileged," he said. "And
anything not considered privileged can be
subpoenaed." -
The manual has come up again and again
during the course of the VA trial, now in a
week of recess.

Gold and Silver Streak
If you're planning to take the train to Chicago,
do it before June 1. Amtrack announced its second
fare increase in less than a year Wednesday,
blaming inflation and losses of equipment and
fares last winter. The price increase on the Chi-
cago to' Detroit run will be three percent,plus
a surcharge. In hard dollars, that means a one-
way coach ticket from Ann Arbor to Chicago will
cost $17 (up from $15.50) and a first class ticket
will cost $26.25 (up from $24.25). Coach fares to
Detroit will rise from $3.00 to $3.25, and first class
fares to Detroit will go from $4.75 to $5.10, though
an employee at Amtrak's Ann Arbor station added
"We don't sell too many first class fares to De-
troit." An Amtrak spokesperson said Wednesday
that the cold winter caused equipment breakdowns,
and the company is now incurring unexpected re-
pair costs.
Henry Cafe
Come and have lunch this afternoon at Henfy
Ford's pool. Oh, Henry won't be there, of course,
and it may cost you a little something, but Mon-
day the University's Dearborn campus added Ford's
old swimming pool to its "list of chic restaurants.
"The Pool" features wicker chairs, plants, wait-
resses in chemise-style uniforms, and marble bench-
es by the poolside heated with radiators. The pool

-TODAY-
was built in the 1920's, and with a sort of George-
Washington-slept-here pride the University points
out that Henry himself "took an occasional dip"
in the 50-foot laggoon. So now, you can have both
a bite of a sandwich and a piece of history which,
as the old man himself asserted, is bunk..
Happenings ...
... it's off into the blue with the International
Center field trip at 4 p.m., leaving from 603 E.
Madison. This week's trek could actually turn into
trip with a bit of luck, since it's a mushroom
hunt ... but if it's music that alters your con-
sciousness, try the Eclipse Jazz workshop at 4:30
p.m. in the Pendleton Room of the Michigan Union
... would-be 'Andrew Youngs can get a taste of
the action as the "Model U.N." conference opens
tonight at 7 p.m. in the League ballroom. Speakers
will be Dr. Thomas Miller of the U.S. State Dept.
on "The U.N. - another perspective" and J. David
Singer on "Disarmament development and the
U.N." ... an introductory program of siddha medi-
tation will be offered at 7::30 at 1520 Hill ... while
across campus "Palestine Lives," a program con-
sisting of lectures by Dr. Hatem Husaini of the
Arab Information Center in Washington and Dr.
Halim Barakat of Georgetown University, will be
held at 7:30 in the Union's Kuenzel Room ... and
across town, the Public Library's meeting room,
Fifth at William, plays host to a program on pre-

pared childbirth and child care, also at 7:30 ...
finally, a woodwind quartet from the School of
Music will perform at 8 p.m. in the Union's Pen-
dleton Room.
Get a horse
Amid the ringing promises to conserve energy
and cut government waste, a lot of people as-
sumed that thefleaders on Capitol Hill would be
giving up their gas-guzzlingg Cadillac limousines
for more economical means of transportation. Hu-
bert Humphrey on a Honda, Peter Rodino in jog-
ging shorts, Barry Goldwater hitchhiking - the
mind boggles. But now the truth is out, and it
proves to be less than stirring. Three House lead-
er said Wednesday they would scrap their Caddies
for that champion of the energy-conservation move-
ment, the Oldsmobile 98. The Olds 98, Speaker
Thomas O'Neill pointed out after announcing his
switch, "gets 18 miles a gallon. The Caddies only
got 14." And the Graf Zeppelin only got eight.
On the outside
Fish are jumpin' and the cotton is high. It'll be
warm and breezy today, with a very slight chance
of showers in the afternoon and a high of 80. To-
night will be warm too, with a low of about 60
and Saturday it's more of the same - cloudy, a
high of 78.

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