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May 04, 1977 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-05-04

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 4, ; 977

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesdey, May 4, 1977

NO FILM DEBUT:
Altman amuses crowd
Ry OWEN GLEIBERMAN Altman's first film, "That Cold can film circles, and his orig-
IAST SEMESTER'S Robert~ Day in the Park, wvent relative- inal techniques and organic
Altma stilconcdetunnoticed AAft SH, he style of film-making have made
Altmn fstivl cnclued y unotied.him one of the most creative
April 28 with the personal ap- went on to make films such as and vital forces in modern film.
pearance of Altman in Hill Audi- The Long Goodbye, a modern Altman spoke to a large en-
torim. version of the Philip Marlow thusiastic crowd, and the audi-
Altman has made eleven fea- story, and Nashville, his epic ence managed to pose enough
ture films since he broke onto vision of America, set in the questions to keep the evening
the scene with MA'S'H in count-y-music capital of the going for several hours. There
1970. Formerly a television di- world was, however, one big disap-
rector (his credits in that area Altman has always been con- pointment in the course of the
include Bonanza and Combat), sidered a maverick in Ameri- event, namely the cancellation
of 3 Women, Altman's newly re-
leased filmn, which he had is-
tended to screen. Due to legal
difficulties which Altman claim-
ed were totally out of the fes-
tival organizer's control, 20th
Century Fox allowed Altman to
screen only one reel (the first
20 minutes) of the film, amount-
ing to nothing more than a long
trailer. Whether this arrange-
ment was better than nothing,
O N Yin not sure, but the audience
WIT. diAONt See ALTMAN, Page 7
Cott IV. SCREEN
y« ALL MR R f wSpOTX0IWJ NLEAUES l
12& 4MONTHI

Arts
May Fest opener:*
'Dead', well played

By KAREN PAUL
THE PROBLEM with the op-
ening concert of the May
Festival was its lack of vitality.
The Philadelphia Orchestra
conducted by Eugene Ormandy
performed an all Rachmaninoff
program on Wednesday night
which at times pleased a full
house at Hill Auditorium. But
what could be less appropriate
than opening a spring festival
with a tone poem called "The
Isle of the Dead"?
The piece began with low, un-
dulating arpeggios and ebbed
and flowed into several climax-
es which were never quite dra-
matic enough, though the
strings had a truly pretty
sound and the brass section cer-
tainly was not timid. The solo
horn performed lyrically, and
the oboe and trumpet carried
their melodies with sensitivity.
Gary Graffman, pianist, per-

forming the Concerto No. 2 in
C Minor, proved able technic-
ally but could not furnish the
spark needed to enliven the
concert. In fact, the lush ex-
pressive Adagio cried out for
more -feeling which Graffman
failed to provide. With the live-
ly pace of the last movement,
the soloist displayed light and
even technique, and the orches-
tra gave solid support whether
the atmosphere was a playful or
romantically I y r i c a 1, all
Tschaikovsky.
R a c h m a n i n o f f' s
Symphonic Dances, Op. 45 are
quite tame for having been
written in 1940. The rhythmic
first dance featured solo pas-
sages for oboe, clarinet, trum-
pet and saxophone: each exhib-
ited musicality and fine clear
tones.
A tight brass section opened
the second dance, and the or-
chestra continued, first with a
delicate waltz, then with rich
harmonies. Delicate fluttering
scales in the flute and clarinet
accompanied the adept srtings.
JHiE. THIRD IDANCE, the
most colorful, employed a
variety of percussion instru-
ents and syncopated rhythms.
See ORMANDY, Page 7

THE COLLABORATIVE
sping ant Qnd aokft cIsses
batik-bobbin lace - colligraphy & bookmak-
ing - Chinese brush pointing - contemporary
quilting -- drawing - the figure in modern
art - jewelry - leaded gloss I & II - pho-
tography I & 1 1--- quilting - sculptural sur-
faces - watercolor I & II - weaving
6 week session May 16-June 25
$18.00
U-M ARTSITS & CRAFTSMEN GUILD
2nd Fl. Michigan Union-763-4430
X-

Where House Records
and

Florence
sends
its love
PU. TO WITH ,1
DOLPHIN
'Ia , rd da Vini' ai.,
An<ea del Viru, ihi>
01'= on called lore nce'e
Ditrect from
Ootroits sisr -aiy
thinks to the
Renaissance
icnter Partnership
ALSO FIVE OTHER
EXHIBITIONS
IVI roit Collec s Alri al1n rt
ITiian iand ll
Vene ian Woodut,
Art o lthe W51odt
w ltalian W1t ng \ \ itht
Renaissanc e \Mh,
I)e irit Publi i hru
'ihiow (ilhriighi Sli, i
AlL FREE
The Detnoit
Institute of Arts

j

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