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May 22, 1970 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1970-05-22

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, May 22, 1970

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, May 22, 1970

Bump -headed

to

Iowa?

IOWA CITY (R) -Forest Eva-
shevski, who has resigned as Uni-
versity of Iowa athletic director,
said yesterday he quit because he
doesn't want to continue in the
job and s u g g e s t e d Chalmers1
"Bump" Elliott of Michigan would
"be an excellent man for this
school."
Evashevski made his remarks
at a news conference at which he
denied a charge by ousted head
football coach Ray Nagel that
Evashevski had expressed interest
in resuming the coaching reins
he relinquished in 1960.
He said this and other charges
by Nagel read "like a big typo-
graphical error."
Evashevski coupled his remarks
with a plea that all hands cease
the bickering that has torn the
athletic department and turn their
sprts
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER

shevski came to Iowa as head pense accounts.
football coach in 1952. there have been
Evashevski retorted yesterday expense accounts

Charges that He said he didn't agree with
irregularities in the athletic board's action Tues-
of some coaches day but said the board and uni-

that Nagel "has not exactly been
a stranger to difficulties" during
his four years at Iowa.
He said Nagel "has gone through
five assistant coaches" and three,
quarterbacks under Nagel had
failed to finish their careers.
Evashevski also denied Nagel's
charge that he had directed any
football assistants to fasify ex-

have been. under investigation by versity president Willard Boyd,
the university and the state audi- who acquiesced in the decision,
tor's office. "have not acted without due con-
Nagel said Wednesday his aides sideration."
had followed the expense account He added that he feels he has
procedure specified by Evashevski. always been fairly treated during
Evashevski, however, said falsi- his 18 years at Iowa and now "I
fying expense accounts is an am bowing out." He said he has
NCAA violation and he wanted his made no plans, but may remain in
coaches to abide by NCAA rules. Iowa City and enter business.

FLOOD'S COURT BATTLE:
Greenburg hits reserve clause

NEW YORK (P)-Hall of famer
Jackie Robinson and Hank Green-
burg testified in the Curt Flood
suit against baseball yesterday
that the controversial reserve
clause was heavily waited in favor
of the owners and could be modi-
fied without hurting the sport.
The two former baseball greats
each presented different pictures
as they testified, Robinson emo-
tionaland fidgeting with his glass-
es, Greenburg calm and in control
of himself at all times while call-

ing for a more harmonious owner
player relationship.
Robinson, who became the first
black player in the majors when
he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers
in 1947, characterized the reserve
clause as "one sided in favor of
the owners" and said the absence
of modification could provoke "a,
serious strike by the players."
Greenburg testified that the
provision in the contract known
as the reserve clause-actually a'
option renewal clause-should be
eliminated and replaced by a pro-a

efforts to "picking up the
"I think we have a fine
tion and a fine athletic
ment," he said. "I think

pieces."
institu-
depart-
we can.

put this affair to bed and write
' a new chapter in Iowa athletics."
There was no immediate, indi-
cation whether the board in con-
trol of athletics would accept
Evashevski's endorsement of El-
liott and offer him the dual job
of athletic director and head foot-
ball coach.
Evashevski said he things El-
liott could cure the simmering feud
in the university's athletic pro-
gram and "weld both factions into
one group."
The four-month feud between
Evashevski and Nagel came to a
,head earlier this week when the
board in a surprise move accepted
Evashevski's resignation and ire-
lieved Nagel of his duties, both
effective June 30.
Nagel said Wednesday his rela-
tionship with Evashevski has been
"ugly" and cited a 'number of in-
stances of what he called "harass-
ment" by Evashevski.
He charged that dissension in
the athletic department has exist-
ed for all the 18 years since Eva-

Red Kelly named coach
and G.M. for Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH (P}-Red Kelly
was officially named general man-
ager and coach of the Pittsburgh
Penguins of the National. Hockey
League yesterday. In the general
manager's post, he succeeds Jack
Riley who was promoted to execu-
tive director.
Riley also retains the title of
acting president of the club.
The official announcement came
at a news conference, but it was
no surprise. It had been rumored
for several days that the 42-year-
old Kelly would return for his sec-
ond season as Pittsburgh coach.
Kelly led the Penguins to their
first playoffs in the NHL's West
Division in their three-year his-
tory..
He succeeded Red Sullivan after
leading the Los Angeles Kings to
two playoff spots in the two years
he coached there.
'We only came six victories from

+4
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Major League Standings

;
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AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division East Division1
W L Pet. GB W L Pet. GB
Baltimore 26 12 .693 - Chicago 18 16 .529 -
New York 21 18 .538 54 New York 19 18 .514 %
Detroit 17 18 .483 714 St. Louis 15 18 .500 1
Boston 16 19 .457 8% Pittsburgh 18 22 .450 3
Washington 16 21 .432 914 Montreal 15 22 .405 4% t
Cleveland 13 20 .394 1014 Philadelphia 15 23 .395 5
West Division West Division1
Minnesota 25 10 .714 - Cincinnati 29 11 .725 -
California 25 13 .658 114 Los Angeles 22 i .519 6
Oakland 18 20 .474 8}4 Atlanta 21 16 .569 6% t
Chicago 16 21 .432 10 Houston 19 22 .463 10%
Milwaukee 13 23 .361 12Y2 San Francisco 18 22 .450 11 1
Kansas City 13 24 .351 13 San Diego 18 24 .429 12
Yesterday's Results Yesterday's Results
Detroit 6, Baltimore 4, 1st game Montreal 7, Pittsburgh 6
Baltimore 3, Detroit 1, 2nd game Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 3;
Cleveland 10, Boston 7 Atlanta at Los Angeles. inc.
New 'York'2, Washington 0 Cincinnati 3, Houston 0I1
Other clubs not scheduled Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games Today's Games 3
Milwaukee at Kansas City, night Pittsburgh at Montreal, night
California at Minnesota, night Chicago at New York, night
Oakland at Chicago, night St. Louis at Philadelphia, night
W1ashington at Detroit, night Cincinnati at Houston, night
New York at Cleveland, night Atlanta at Los Angeles, night
Boston at Baltimore, night San Diego at San Francisco, night _
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winning the Stanley Cup," Kelly
said. "We want to do a little bet-
ter, and I think we can. I'm very
happy with what has happened."
As general manager, Kelly will'
have charge of the day-to-day
club operations; supervise scout-
ing activities and player negoti-
ations.
Donald H. Parsons, owner of
the club, said: "The Riley-Kelly
team will stay in Pittsburgh. Be-
tween them they have 55 years
of hockey know-how. I represent
two years of not-know-how hoc-
key.
"There is only one think better
than one fighting Irishman-and
that's two of them," Parsons
added.
Kelly, the Hockey News' Coach
of the Year, is a member of the
Hockey Hall of Fame. He played
for Detroit and Toronto for 20
years.
A Note'
The Michigan State High School
Track Championships will be held
in Ann Arbor on Saturday, May
23 at the outdoor track. Prelimi-
naries will start at 10:00 a.m. with
the finals beginning at 1:00 p.m.
This will be the first time the
championship will be held here-
it was held before in Lansing.
There seems to be a good chance
that records will be smashed due
to Michigan's substantially faster
track and because of several ex-
cellent studs.
Among them are "Campy" Rus-
sel, All-State basketball star from
Pontiac Central, Marshall Dill in
the 220 from Detroit Northern and
Kevin Reabe in the 880-from
Waterford Kettering.
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vision that gives the signing club
control for a certain number of
years but not for the duration of
a players career.
"Anything that is one sided in
this country is wrong," said Rob-
inson.
In the afternoon session, Flood's
attorneys put on the stand Jim
Brosnan, a former relief pitcher
with the Chicago Cubs and White
Sox, Cincinnati and St. Louis,
who had a checkered career and
is best known for a book he wrote,
called the Long Season.
Brosnan apparently was called
to testify as a contrast to stars
such as Robinson and Greenberg,
and relate his experiences in base-
ball within the framework of the
reserve system.
Brosnan related several in-
stances when he was not allowed
to publish his works during the
season. He said he had been shown
by Bill DeWitt, then the Cincin-
nati general manager, a provision
in his contract which said he could
not publish during the season
without prior consent of the club.
"I had never noticed that pro-
vision," said Brosnan.
Brosnan also said he was noti-
fied of his release after his last
season in the majors by a letter
which came from the White Sox
with 36 cents posage dues. That,
of course, brought laughter from
the courtroom as did an earlier
story.
That happened when Brosnan
told about his travels in 1954 when
he was up and down the minor
league ladder with five different
clubs.
He said that at one point "my
wife threatened to divorce me.
Once when I was called to move
she had just bought two weeks of
steak for the freezer. She wanted
to know what to do with the
steaks."
And, asked counsel, what did
she do with the steaks?
"She gave them," said Brosnan,
"to the player who reported in
my place."

Tigers
split with
Baltimore
DETROIT L - Merv Ret-
tenmund cracked a two - run
homer in the ninth inning,
carrying the Baltimore Orioles
to a 3-1 victory over Detroit
and a split of their twi-night
doubleheader yesterday.
The Tigers won the first game
6-4 with a five-run burst snap-
ping a 1-1 tie in the seventh in-
ning.
In the first game Orioles' starter
Dave McNally, 7-2, walked Mickey
Stanley and Willie Horton in the
seventh. Then Jim Northrup hit
a two-out bloop single scoring
Stanley. Center-fielder Paul Blair's
throw to the infield bounced off
Horton's leg for an error and Hor-
ton scored.
Bill Freehan doubled Northrup
home, and then Don Wert tagged
reliever Dave Leonhard for a two-
run homer to cap the inning.
Les Cain, 2-2, was touched for
Rettenmund's solo homer in the
sixth and another by Blair.
In the nightcap Rettenmund
connected against reliever John
Hiller, who had earned a save in
the first game victory. Hiller came
on in the eighth inning of the
nightcap when the Orioles pushed
across the tying run on singles by
Rettenmund, Don Buford, a walk
and a sacrifice fly by Boog Powell.
Dave Johnson walked leading
off the Orioles' ninth and then
Rettenmund, who had homered in
the first game, connected again.
for the winning runs.
A bloop single by Northrup
started the rally, scoring a run
after a pair of walks. On the play,
center fielder Blair's throw to the
infield bounced off Horton who
was running to third and Horton
scored the next run on the error.
Freehan doubled another run
across and then * Wert followed
with a two-run homer.
* * *
Yanks move up
NEW YORK (P)-Danny 'Cater
drilled a two-run homer in the
fifth inning for New York's first
hit and Steve Hamilton rescued
struggling starter Mel Stottlemyre
from a ninth inning jam as the
Yankees stopped Washington 2-0
last night.
The Senators, who stranded 14
runners, loaded the bases off Stot-
tlemyre in the ninth with one out.
Hamilton then came on to strike
out Mike Epstein and Bernie Al-
len to p r e s e r v e Stottlemyre's
fourth consecutive victory. He has
lost three times.

-Associated Press
TIGER MICKEY STANLEY crosses the plate scoring Detroit's first run under the watchful eye of
home plate umpire Bill Kunkel as Baltimore catcher Andy Etchebarren was late with the tag in the
first game of the twi-night double header. The Tigers went on to win the first game 6-4 on a five
run seventh inning burst but fell to the Orioles in the second 3-1.

Stottlemyre issued 11 walks and
six hits.
Rookie Dick Such, 1-2, making
his first major league start, walk-
ed Roy White to open the fifth
and Cater followed with his third
home run, a line drive into the
left field seats. The only other
hit off Such in the six innings he
hurled was Jerry Kenney's two-
out single later in the fifth.
Phils top Cards
PHILADELPHIA (P)-Tony Tay-
lor's ninth inning single gave
Philadelphia a 4-3 victory over St.
Louis last night, spoiling a 16-
strikeout performance by Steve
Carlton and a dramatic home run
by Richie Allen.
After Allen's 14th homer keyed
a three-run Cardinal rally which
tied the game in the top half of
the ninth, Johnny Briggs opened
the Phils' half with an infield
single. Byron Browne sacrificed
and after an intentional walk and
a strikeout, Taylor singled Briggs
home.
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