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May 15, 1970 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-05-15

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Friday, May 15, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. %4 Z:t%;, -j - v -

Bruin

coach

Sindei
BOSTON AP) - Harry Sinden,
young coach of the Boston Bruins,
pulled a surprise yesterday by
quiting the National H o c k e y
League club only four days after
leading it to a first Stanley Cup
in 29 years.
The 37-year-old Sinden, who
helped lift the Bruins from last
place to the Stanley Cup in just
four seasons as coach, stepped out
Michigan netters won all their
matches in the opening rounds
of the Big Ten championships
in Minnesota. In doubles, Jon
Hainline and Mark Conti1
downed Illini Chip Clemente
and Tom Dulap, 6-3, 6-3. Joel
Ross and Tim Ott beat Jim
Ebbits and Dave Sterns of
Minnesota, 6-1, 6-1. Bruce De-
Boer and Dan McLaughlin
teamed to trounce Doug Con-
nant and Ken Cohen of North-
western, 6-3, 6-1.
In singles, Ramon Almonte
took StevesEhlers of Iowa by
6-1, 6-1 scores. Other single
matches were rained out.

quits club

disappointed when they learned
Coach Harry Sinden had quit to
enter private business.
"We are losing a damn good
man," said defenseman Bobby Orr,
a National Hockey League Super-
star who won four of the league's
six major awards this season. "We
did the playing, but he was there{
with us working every night.
"He must have got a good deal
to leave. You know, it's a tough
job. I don't think I'd want to be
a coach. If anything goes wrong,
you are the one they go after."
Center Dereck Sanderson said
he hopes Sinden reconsiders, which
is unlikely.
"To lose him as a coach is se-
rious," Sanderson said. "It's a
blow to all of us. A new coach
won't be able to handle the club
like Harry. I hate to see him, go.
He's the best coach I have ever!
played for."
High-scoring Phil Esposito call-
ed Sinden "a super coach." He
added: "He certainly did a great
job with this club. I am very dis-
appointed."

I daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
PAT ATKINS
Gerry Cheevers, who developed
into a top goalie under Sinden in
the minor leagues, expressed dis-
belief.
"How can a guy quit when's he's
on top?" Cheevers asked. "I just
don't understand it."
Schmidt, who said he did not
learn of Sinden's resignation plans
until Wednesday afternoon, plans
to launch a search for a new
coach immediately.
He said he had "no ideas" about
a new coach, but would go looking
among NHL clubs and their af-
filiates for a top man. He added
he hopes to sign a new coach be-
fore the NHL draft in June.

-Associated Press
Horns of a Dilemma
Apprentice Matador Jaime Gonzales, known affectionately as "El Puno," would probably prefer to
remain airborne than land atop the bull in Madrid's Las Ventas Arena. The bull was brought to a
halt by assistants holding onto its tail, and Gonzales escaped unharmed.

-Associated Press
Boston coach Sinden reveals news

IN MEETINGS:

--.~

OSU sports recommence,
but 11 th grid game tabled
By The Associated Press sions on the proposal which now
In Columbus, officials ruled yes- would require the 11th game to
terday that Ohio State's golf and be a conference contest.
track teams could resume Big Ten Reed has been confined to a
Conference activity this weekend. Bloomington hospital with pneu-
The decision was made following monia since last weekend, but is
an order by university President expected to leave after this week-
Novice G. Fawcett to reopen the end.
school to its students next Tues- The Big Ten gave initial an-

at the peak of his career to enter
private business.
Sinden told a news conference
he will join "in an executive ca-
pacity" Stirling Homex Corp. rf
Avon, N.Y., a modular housing
manufacturer headed by David
Stirling Jr., a boyhood friend of
Sinden's.
Sinden's contract ran out after
the Bruins completed a four-game
sweep of St. Louis for the Stanley
Cup Sunday afternoon. However,
there was no indication then he
would give up his post with the
team.
He insisted there was "nothin
but amiable relations" between
him and the Bruins' management.
General Manager Milt Schmidt
said that "money had absolutely
nothing to do" with the resigna-
tion.
However, reports persisted that
Sinden and the Bruins were un-
able to reach terms on a new con-
tract. One possibility was that
Sinden wanted a multi-year agree-
ment. This has not been the
Bruins' policy.
Sinden said he regretted leaving
hockey after 17 years in the sport.
However, he said he had an "ex-
ceptional opportunity" and is
"going on to exciting new chal-
lenges and opportunities in mass
residential construction."
Sinden began his hockey career
as an amateur player in Canada.
He played on the 1958 Canadian
national team which defeated
Russia for the World Amateur
Championship.
Members of the Boston Bruins,
still celebrating their Stanley Cup
championship, were surprised and

day.
The Buckeye baseball team,
leading the league with an 8-0
record, also will return to action!
after Fawcett left the decision to!
play up to athletic director Dick'
Larkins.
The tennis team will not com-
pete in the Big Ten matches at
Minneapolis because play in that
event began yesterday.
Larkins, after polling the ath-!
P letic council, ruled Ohio State
teams could compete only in out-
of-town activity this weekend.
That necessitated moving the
1 e a g u e baseball doubleheader
scheduled here Saturday with In-
diana to Bloomington. Ohio State
needs to play one more game to
be eligible for the conference title.
In Bloomington, the Big Ten de-
layed final action until August on!
the proposed addition of an 11th
game to conference football sched-
ules beginning in 1971.
The faculty representatives and
Sathletic directors, holding their
regular meeting, decided to wait
until ailing commissioner Bill!
Reed can spell out needed revi-
Major League
Standings |.

BIG TEN TOURNEYS
Michigan seeks team firsts

r

proval in March to an 11th foot-
ball game, sanctioned by the
NCAA beginning this season. But
the action requires review by each
conference school.
Conference officials apparently
hit a snag yesterday on several
points, including the fact that four
schools already have booked an ex-
tra conference game for 1971 and
the question of whether the 11th
game should be added at the start
or the end of the season.
The four schools - Wisconsin,
Northwestern, Purdue and Iowa
already have been told by Reed
their 11th game in 1971 could be
a nonconference contest if so de-
sired.

Seattle gets future franchise;
Rhodesia leaves Davis Cup
By The Associated Press
0 NEW YORK - American League owners voted last night to
give Seattle another baseball franchise 'if and when" the league
expands in the future, The Associated Press learned.
The unanimous vote was taken at a closed-door meeting on the
eve of a joint session of the major league owners here.
The action by the AL owners appeared to be an attempt to stop a
threatened $82-million suit by the city of Seattle against baseball
and the American League because of the recent franchise switch
to Milwaukee.
* * *

Three of the Big Ten's four
spring sports determine conference
championships t h i s weekend.
Michigan teams travel to golf at
Illinois, tennis at Minnesota, and
track at Indiana.
The tennis squad yesterday be-
gan its drive for a third straight
conference championship. (See
box this page.)
During the season, the netters
swept through nine straight con-
ference dual meets and registered
66 of a possible 81 points. How-
ever, since the Ohio State tennis
meet points are being erased from
opponent's records, Michigan will
,. ,as all-sports
hangs in balance
Michigan appears assured of
another all-sports trophy for its
showing in the 1969-70 season.
With only spring sports yet to be
decided, Michigan holds a com-
manding lead over challengers
Michigan State and Ohio State.
Michigan has a 7.7 average,
based on a 10-for-first, 9-for-sec-
ond descending criterion, for seven
sports completed so far. Michigan
State has a 6.8 and Ohio State a
6.7 average.
The completed sports are foot-
ball, basketball, swimming, wres-
tling, gymnastics, hockey, and In-
door track. Michigan and MSU
competed in all seven, and OSUI
took part in all but hockey.
Michigan's 7.7 average repre-
sents close to a third-place aver-
age for each sport. However, this
is somewhat lower than preceding
years when Michigan won the all-
sports trophy with averages of 8.5
and up.
Michigan has claimed the
trophy eight of the last 10 year.
Overall the conference teams are
more balanced this year. Michigan
State is second with 6.8 and Il-
linois ninth with 4.4, Northwest-
ern is last with 3.5.
No team has won more than one
conference title outright so far
this season. But Michigan's cham-
pionship in gymnastics and co-
championship in football is better
than any other team.
Michigan will likely add one
more outright title-in tennis-to
its repertoire. Only disasters in
golf, track and baseball could pre-
vent Michigan from taking the
trophy.
Ex-editor convicted
Jim Forrester, Daily Associ-
ate Sports Editor 1969-70, was
convicted yesterday of creating
a contention, a charge stem-
ming out of the protests against
the General Electric Corporation
on Feb. 18.
Forrester felt he was very
ably represented by David Gold-
stein but noted, "It's extremely
difficult to obtain a fair trial
when no one that even looks
like a peer sits on the jury
panel."
Forrester's sentencing is June
19 at 9:30 in the morning at the
City Hall. All friends of the de-
fendant and other interested
parties are invited to attend.

drop the nine points it acquired
against the Buckeyes in the fig-
uring of conference champion.
Track run-offs begin today, with
defending outdoor champion Wis-
consin and Indiana considered the
favorites. The Badgers have won
the last four indoor track titles,
also.
The Hoosiers, out to dethrone
the Badgers, this season defeated
Wisconsin in a triangular meet at
Michigan State and will be com-
peting on a home track.
Michigan's smashing of Purdue
last weekend 108-45 with strong
performances puts the Wolverines
into consideration as a darkhorse.
Ira Russell, Michigan's senior
long jumper, reached a career
high against Purdue last week
when he leaped 25-6%2 which was
tops in the conference. He could
also take the top spot in the triple
jump.
Wolverine 660 runner Norm
Cornwell also has a Big Ten best
in his specialty. Cornwell turned
in a 1:18.9 against the Boiler-
makers and has run it in 18:8 flat
this season. Godfrey Murray has
the top mark in the league for the

120-yard high hurdles, turning in
a 13:7 this year.
This year the conference will be
switching over to the NCAA sys-
tem of scoring track. The league
will score six places in all 18
events with a 19-8-6-4-2-1 sys-
tem, including relay events. In
previous years the Big Ten used
a five-place scoring of 54-3-2-1.
The championships tomorrow
will be televised live by a 26-sta-
tion network, including CKLW-
TV in Windsor.
In golf, Randy Erskine from
Battle Creek and Keith Mohan
from Grand Blanc will lead Mich-

igan's bid

B*illboardr
Family night runs from 7-10
p.m. tonight at the IM Build-
ing. Students, faculty, and staff
and their families will have pri-
ority on facilities and equip-
ment.

for the championship.

L'

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BOWVLING

SUNDAY SPECIAL
3 GAMES $1

MIXED LEAGUES
SIGN UP NOW!

NOON TODAY!
DIAG RALLY
Support Campaign GM to get U. of M.'s
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and CAMPAIGN GM
WAR, RACISM, and POLLUTION are good
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For $450-six kids can GET OFF a
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IS YOUR CHANCE TO
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THAT IMPORTANT?
Cash in those tickets and BLOW
Your Parents' Minds

MICHIGAN UNION LANES, 3-11 P.M. daily
AIR-CONDITIONED

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L. Pct.
Baltimore 22 9 .710
Detroit 15 14 .517
New York 17 16 .515
Boston' 14 16 .467
4 Washington 13 18 .419
Cleveland 10 17 .370
West Division
California 21 10 .677
Minnesota 20 10 .667
Oakland 16 16 .500
Chicago 13 17 .433
Kansas City 11 19 .367
Milwaukee 11 21 .344
w Yesterday's Results
Minnesota 5, Kansas City 2
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
California at Oakland, night
Minnesota at Milwaukee, night
Kansas City at Chicago, night
Baltimore at Washington, night
Detroit at New York, night
Cleveland at Boston, night,
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division.

0 SALISBURY, Rhodesia - Rhodesia, faced with the refusal of
GB other countries to play against it, withdrew yesterday from this year's
- Davis Cup competition.
6 Guy Hodder, secretary of the Rhodesian Lawn Tennis Asso-
7 ciation, said last night a cable had been sent to the Davis Cup Euro-
io pean Zone committee withdrawing the Rhodesian entry.
He said the decision to withdraw was taken because it was thought
to be in Rhodesia's best long-term interests.

TV RENTALS
$10 per month,
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nejac TV, Rentals
662-5671
SERVI NG BIG 10 SCHOOLS SI NCE 1961

make out your checks to
THE FRESH AIR FUND
844 West 41 st Street
New York City, New York 10036
THE WASHINGTON STAR
225 Virginia Avenue, S.E.
Washington, D.C. 20003
Attention:
SUMMER CAMP FUND

1'

fa

1/2
5x4
71",
914
101.,

* * *
* PITTSBURGH - The new Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh
won't be open as scheduled May 29 because of a strike by Teamster
Union members who drive ready mix concrete trucks, officials said
yesterday.
They say that the walkout and a host of other labor problems made
it impossible to say when the $35 million bowl across the Allegheny
River from downtown Pittsburgh would be ready for use.
The Pittsburgh Pirates had been scheduled to christen the 50,000-
seat arena with a game against the San Francisco Giants on May 29.
* * *
* CORFE, England - Golfers at the exclusive Taunton and
Pickeridge Club were indignant yesterday even though their scores
improved dramatically.
Somebody during the night had sawed down a 200-year-old oak
tree, the principal hazard on the 17th fairway.
"If we ever discover the cad who did this, he will be drummed
out of the club," said John Bevan, chairman of the greens committee.
That sort of thing just isn't done, you know."

NNW"

ENACT, JC's, Watershed Council
Ecology Center, Scouts, Sierra Club
HURON RIVER

W L Pet.

Chicago 16 13 .552
New York 16 16 .500
St. Louis 14 15 .483
Pittsburgh 15 18 .455
Philadelphia 13 19 .4(6
Montreal 10 20 .333
Wesk"t 1)iVision
Cincinnati 24 9 .72;
Atlanta 18 13 .581
Los Angeles 17 1,1 .548
San Francisco 17 17 .544
Houston 16 17 .485
San Diego 15 24 .429
yesterda'I. Results

GB
1%
3
3
414
6 '

5
6
1'
8
10

Montreal at Phiaelphia, ppd.
Newt York at Chicag-o. ppd.
St. Louis 11, Hitt :burgh7
Houston at San Diego, inc.
Sani Francisco a': Los Angeles. inc.
Ofther clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
New fork at Philadelphia, night
Montreal at Pittsburgh, night
Chicago at St. Louis, night
Atlanta at Cincinnati, night
Sans Francisco at Los AngĀ°eles. night
louston at San Diego, night
-I

FFDon't pack if you're coming back! &.''
S TORE YOUR CLOTHES WITH US
Pay for your dry cleaning when you come back
CL41DTC ''fi. m;fk n. r i,%nn'nn ..:._ _

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