100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 14, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, Mov 14, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, May 14, 1970

STATE LEGISLATURE:'
Vote on abortion
reform bill pressed

-Associated Press
Taking a cut for peace
To enhance their image in the community, several San Jose College students line up yesterday at the
Communications Cut-In for peace to have their long locks trimmed. The students had wanted to cut
their hair before speaking outside the San Jose campus on the Indochinese war. Leaders say they
hope to'show that the issue of peace is too important for the length of hair to prevent communica-
tion.
NO CONFRONTA TION:

LANSING (' - With pressure
building on both sides, backers of
abortion reform legislation in the
state Senate say they hope the
final critical vote on their bill will
be taken before the end of the
week.
Sponsors of the once-defeated
bill, still trying to round up the
needed 20 votes for passage, post-
poned a slated reconsideration
vote for the second time yester-
day with no opposition.
But the backers expressed fears
that some of the 17 senators who
voted for the bill last week might
withdraw their support if another
weekend passed before the sec-
ond-chance vote.
Groups pushing for abortion
law reform, as well as the organ-
izations vehemently opposed to
the bill, have stepped up lobby-
ing efforts since the Senate re-
jected the proposal by three votes
last week. Seventeen h a d voted
for the bill, 19 against.
The measure, sponsored by Sen.
Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann Arbor),
would allow any woman resident
of Michigan to obtain an abor-
tion during the first 90 days of
pregnancy.
As the Senate postponed action
yesterday, the state Public Health
Department issued a "position pa-
per" saying that the present law
- allowing abortions only when
the life of the mother is endan-
gered - "should be changed and
t h a t legal abortions should be
made available to Michigan wo-
men."
Dr. Maurice Beizen, the depart-
ment's newly appointed director,
had already announced his sup-
port for the pending Senate bill.
T h e department's statement
said that "A woman with too

indignities, who becomes pregnant
again, understandably may want
to abort that pregnancy.
"A 15-year-old girl who, out of
ignorance or fear or even careless-
ness, becomes pregnant, under-
standably may want to abort that
pregnancy. A rape victim, a
woman who has rubella, a woman
in poor health may want to abort
a pregnancy," t h e statement
added.
"To refuse such women that op-
tion is to condemn those children
to an unwanted life, a life with-
out love, a life without dignity,"
it continued. "To compare such
women to wanton killers - to call
them murderers - is, we believe,
not only unjust but immoral."
In other action Wednesday, the
Senate passed and sent to the
House of Representatives a bill
authorizing Atty. Gen. Frank Kel-
ley to institute civil proceedings
against corporations and busi-
nesses engaged in such criminal
activities as organized gambling
and organized prostitution.
Also given final approval was a
House-passed measure requiring
motorcyclists and their passengers
to wear helmets. Michigan already
has a helmet-wearing law, but a
technical error made last year
would cause that law to expire if
the new bill were not enacted.

Regents to
consider rent
(Continued from Page 1)
cover the costs of the University's
payment to the school board. The
proposal also calls for an addi-
tional renthike of $5 per month to
cover increased operating ex-
penses.
Since the announcement of the
school board payment, the admin-
istration has met opposition from
the Residence Hall Rate Commit-
tee, from the Student Advisory
Committee on Housing (SACH),
and from University Housing Di-
rector John Feldkamp.
In a memo to Acting Vice-Pres-
ident of Student Affairs Barbara
Newell, Feldkamp said the Univer-
sity should not impose the school
payment entirely on the married
tenants.
With the, proposed rent hike,
Feldkamp - said, "the University
will no longer provide the lowest:
rent family housing in Ann Ar-
bor."
Furthermore, he continued, "a
$22.75 per month rent increase
($17.95 plus $5.00) will have an
inflationary e f f e c t throughout
(Ann Arbor's) private housing
market, both single and family."
SACH met yesterday for their
final discussion of the controver-
sial proposal.
At the meeting, Feldkamp said
the Executive Officers are con-
sidering providing to needy ten-
ants in married housing a grant
of the exact amount to be assessed
for the school payment.

t

1

F *

Student Headquarters

For Hi Fi
Components and Service
TV, Stereo, and
Air Conditioner Rentals
HI l STUDIO
121 W. Washington
Downtown, across from Old
German Restaurant
668-7942
FILM BENEFIT for
OZONE HOUSE
"Battle of Algiers"
Friday, May 15
Saturday, May 16
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 MAYNARD
$1.00 FREE EATS

DIAL 665-6290
Endinq Thursday
"One of the year's
10 best pictures!"

"Mm

I

k

"TELL THEM WILLIE
BOY IS HERE"
* FRIDAY *
"The Magic Christian"

OV

TAT

SHOWS AT:
1:15-3:10
5:05-7 :00
9:00 P.M.

Denver shantytown' removed
for second time; troops assist

NOW SHOWING !

DENVER (AP)-Over 1,000 Na- There was no mass confronta-
tional Guardsmen, most of them tion because the 200 inhabitants
carrying unloaded rifles, occu- of the commune, warned by sym-
pied the University of Denver pathizers among the Guardsmen,
campus yesterday until a shanty- abandoned their shantytown a
town which had been occcupied few ,minutes before the Guards-
by antiwar protesters was torn men and 200 Denver police officers
down by police for the second arrived early yesterday morning.
time in three days. Twelve persons were arrested on
There was no violence, and charges of creating a disturbance.
within three hours the demolition Two of those held had been rid-
was complete and the Guardsmen ing a motorcycle up and down
had withdrawn from the campus. the street, waving an American
500 EM U students

flag. The others were arrested,
police said, when they refused to
leave the campus after failing to
produce university identification
cards.
Police and Guardsmen found
campfires smouldering, wine bot-
tles, discarded clothing and bags
of oranges littered about, but the
37 t'ents,. shacks and leantos were
empty.
Using bullldozer-like front-enc
loaders, maintenance workers de-
molished the village in about ar
hour, leaving the lawn pitted b3
remnants of campfires and the
tracks of the trucks. Troops car-
rying bayonet-fixed rifles sur-
rounded the area, while others
patrolled looking for snipers.

I

I

I

clash with
(Continued from Page 1)
Attorney Don Koster, appearing
on behalf of the students, argued+
that according to university regu- +
lations, the suspensions could only+
be for five days and consequently1
had expired on Monday, before
the -disturbances.+
After several hours of delibera-
Lion, the tribunal found in favor
of the students and noted that
Sponberg must also follow univer-
sity regulations.
Beginning at 8 p.m. last night,
police covered the entire campus
area shouting into bullhorns that
anybody seen in the streets would
be arrested.
'U'suspends
four workers
(Continued from Page 1)
porarily operate on a limited basis.
One segment prohibited disci-
plinary action against any of the
strikes, excepting five employes.
Four of these were subsequently
suspended and the fifth dismissed.
Union leaders claim that the dis-
cussion surrounding the two part
agreement indicated that the dis-
cipline would be lighter than what
was levied.
Under the strike settlement, the
union can ask for arbitration on
University disciplinary actions
within 30 days after they are
made. The union is presently seek-
ing an arbitrator for the issue and
preparing arguments against the
suspensions.
A union official stressed last
week that the strike settlement
between the University and the
union had only temporary signi-
ficance.
"It hasn't been settled, its been
quieted," said a union spokesman.
"No matter how much the union
works to keep employes working,
if the supervisor treats people
like slaves, there's nothing we can
do-people will get tired and walk
out of the place," added Mc-
Cracken.

nn 'ratesd~

F"'We're going to
and for all," said
Most of the students arrested in George Seaton, wh
Tuesday's disturbances have been pied the campusv
charged with curfew violation and assistance on Mon
contention. One protester was first encampment w
charged with using obscene lan- But the commune,z
guage in the presence of women Nation West" for
and children, and several were festivalin upstateu
charged with committing felonies, summer, washrebu:
the police withdrew.
Bail for those arrested Tuesday Seaton said any
ranged from $500 for the ob- to rebuild the shan
scenety charge to 1,000 dollars for time would be arres
those charged with contention. Gov. John A. Lov
Those who pleaded guilty on Guardsmen, from D
the curfew violations were sen- Longmont and Col
tenced to spend 30 days in the about midnight y
county jail or pay a fine of $50. negotiations betw
At the start of yesterday's ar- and the universityf
raignments, Ypsilanti D i s t r i c t apparently broke d
Judge Edward Arkinson refused
motions from attorney Johnaton
Rose for personal bonds for the Yippie
defendants.
The personal bond statue per- arrive in
mits the defendants on low mis- akV.~.L
demeanor charges to pay 10 per M
cent of the bond to the court, a MOSdO cr -
loan which is to be repayed on of Yippie leader Je
completion of the case.

end this once
Police Chief
ose men accu-
without Guarc
iday while the
was torn down.
named "Wood-
the big rock
New York last
ilt as soon as
r.
one who triec
tytown a third
ted.
e activated the
enver, Boulder
orado Springs
esterday wher
een protesters
administratior
own.

l
ei,
1

NGC THEATRE CORPORATION
A NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY
FQH ViLLaGE
375 No.MAPLE RD. 7694-30
MON.-FRI.-7:20-9:30
SAT.-SUN.-1 :00-3:00
5:10-7:20-9:30
An Ingo Preminger Production
Color byDE LUXE*
Panavision@ 1.J

many children already

suffering

I
{

I

I

I
{

"oo

ONE NIGHT ONLY
RAMBLIN' JACK
ELLIOTTI
Reprise recording artist
"You mean you want me to sing French songs
when you've got the best damned cowboy singer
in the world stranding right in front of you."
-Jack Elliott in Paris
8P TONIGHT$2.00
... ....

4~

I

0'

reps
Hanoi,
Nancy Rubin,
lf as the wife1

;el

- G-GENERAL AUDIENCES

rry Rubin, said

However, after arraignments
were over, Judge Arkinson changed;
his mind and said the personal
bonds would be granted only if
the defendants could meet "the re-
quirements of the court." He did
not specify what these require-
ments were.
Before Arkinson left, he said,
'My only job is to keep peace in
the community. I have nothing
against the protesters as long as
they stay calm and quiet."
Referring to the high bail, Ark-
inson said, "I want to make sure
those kids show up for trial. The
court must be protected and some
of these kids don't even live in
! Ypsilanti."
"Have you found out where any
one of the kids live," asked de-
fense attorney Rose.
"Well, no," Arkinson replied.
The protests at EMU have been
characterized by considerable rock-,
throwing, particularly at police
cars. In addition, windows have
been smashed, leaving a large
amount of broken glass in the
' streets around the campus.
FPTH POrUMI
FIFTH AVENUE AT LIRTY3
~jDOWNTOWN ANN AREDA
INFORMATION 701-9700
- off

yestertay sne au d two riens ar-
rived in Hanoi Tuesday to estab-
lish diplimatic relations for the
"real United States," which she
said was the Yippie party.
Mrs. Rubin said she and her two
companions - identified as Judy1
Gumbo of Berkeley, Calif., and
Jeanie Plamundon of Ann Arbor,
represent the Youth International┬▒
party, or Yippies, whose headquar-
ters are in New York City.
"We have been invited by the
North Vietnamese government,"
Mrs. Rubin said. "We are a new
nation, not the nation of Presi-
dent Nixon. We hope to establish
our own diplomatic relations and'
gain recognition."

i
t
me iA 3
f
I
t
i
f
/ i
I
I
Eqg
T-9

Tk le Origuir l ilent Cla,5fic
Of Love. And Hate. Of Conflict And Chaos
That Followed The War Between The States!

.I ,

D W GRIFFITH'S

-

Thurs.-7:15, 9:00
SFRI.--7 :15, 9:00,
10:45
"Allen Funt is concerned
with human reactions to
nudity. We're all voyeurs
and it is amusing to see the
reactions."
"A film satirizing generation gap attitudes toward
nudity and sex. I found the audience reacting with

.j
I
}
i
r
i
s
i

1I
i
I
}
r
j
s
i

We do nice things for students.
And their pocketbooks.
- ®---- MM-- Mn-- -----
We know student travel is important. But expensive. So
we're helping to bring down the cost. For example, you 3
can have a $21 room at the Conrad Hilton Hotel in
Chicago for just $9. And rooms at similar reduced rates
at 60 other Hilton Hotels and Inns from Oregon to /
Florida.
So, if you're a student, let us know. Fill out this cou- I
pon and send it to Hilton Hotels Corporation, Travel
Department, National Sales Division, The Palmer House,
Chicago, Illinois 60690.
We'll send you a pamphlet listing the hotels and inns
participating in our special rates program, and an offi-
cial Hilton Student Identification Card to use when you /
register.f

4

Name

I
I

i
t i_..._., .,.ra........

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan