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August 19, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-19

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-*7

0

4

'A

Wednesday, August 19, 1970_

THE MICHIGAN 15AILY

4

a!4e SAr44an Dat
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michican Doily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

The Legislature has won

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 19, 1970

News Phone: 164-0552

'U' and recruiting
ONE OF THE CHARGES leveled against recruiters in
last winter SDS's recruiter campaign was that the re-
cruiters represent companies that discriminate against
women and blacks in their hiring policies. A recent study
by the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commis=
sion (EEOC) confirms this charge.
The study concludes that in Houston, there is gross
discrimination against women and blacks by large com-
panies. And even then, several companies refused to even
testify before the commission about their discriminatory
practices. General Electric, Atlantic-Richfield, DuPont
and Dow Chemical all refused to testify. It is not a coin-
cidence that the recruiters from these companies were
the major focus of the demonstrations last spring.
THE UNIVERSITY has only one criterion for evaluating
whether an interviewing company discriminates, and
that was set up only after a large New York firm refused
to interview women in the law school because it did not
hire women.
The criterion is that a recruiter must interview all
applicants, regardless of race or sex. Whether blacks,
Chicanos or women are hired from those interviews is an-
other question. And whether the interviewing organiza-
tion hires a few token blacks, Chicanos and women from a
college campus w h i 1le systematically discriminating
against them in lower job classifications is deemed not in
the purview of the University.
The University has no investigative apparatus and
almost no enforcement mechanism to see that the com-
panies which it invites to recruit really don't discriminate.
That, it argues, is a function of government agencies like
the EEOC, which is so underfunded by a Congress depen-
dent on corporate campaign contributions and legal fees
that it is hard put to publish even a few research reports
like the one on Houston.
So it is not too surprising that the University admin-
istration is transcending merely' passing the buck by am-
bitiously trying to collect signatures on a statement for
"open recruiting." While its funds mostly do not come
from Congress, they do come from a like-minded state
Legislature, which would like to insure, at the cost of po-
lice action if necessary, that the freedom to discriminate
and the good names of the nation's businesses are pre-
served with respect to the state's college campuses. Thus,
with the funds for their University and their very official
positions at stake, is there any question whose side the,
University administration is on?
-EDWIN BAIRD

R OBBEN FLEMING has b e e n
President for two and a half
years now, and in that time he
has been able to successfully
dodge most of the issues that have
come his way-
But now however, Fleming has,
perhaps without realizing it, found
his "Vietnam."
Gay Liberation Front (GLF) is
not a radical organization. From"
the beginning they feared public-
ity of any k in d and sought to
avoid it. Starting from their first
meek advertisements in the Daily,
however, GLF has steadily gone
on to make a distinctive mark on
the University. Their intent, un-
like some other campus organi-
zations, is not to burn this place
down, but rather to make a ser-
ious effort r'to educate the com-
munity and fellow homosexuals as
to the plight they face.
FLEMING HOWEVER, barred
any kind of GLF convention. He
has admitted selling out his eth-
ics to Lansing. This is the same
man who once said "A university
should always stand up for what
it thinks right."
It is- not important that they
were allowed to hold it in the
Student Activities Building. Flem-
ing had already made his grand-
stand play when he first barred
the convention. The adverse pub-
licity he gave the convention
doubtless drove away many homo-
sexuals who might have profited
from the meeting.
But, he has lost the battle he
described himself as being "be-
tween what you think the Uni-
versity ought to be and what the
University really is because of the
emphasis brought about by out-
side money." -
Fleming has always been wary
of losing outside financial sup-
port but his action against GLF
runs deeper than that. Up till now
it was possible to believe Fleming
when he said he was a humani-
tarian. Now however, he has to-
tally committed himself to ~op-
posing GLF.
AS THE antagonism mounts,
Fleming. (much akin to Johnson's
view of Vietnam) will find him-
self more and more opposed to
GLF. He will talk of the school's
prestige and he w ill fulminate
against those who think GLF
should be allowed their confer-
ence.
Where they will be talking
about the rights of man however,
he will be talking about money.
Unlike the BAM demands of last
March though, he cannot go run
and hide under the protecting um-
brella of the Regents.
The sad thing is that all this is
unnecessary. If the President had
permitted the conference to go

the "hole" society had dug f a r
them,
Alas, Fleming acted otherwise.
Instead of unifying people he has
split them,. Claiming the confer-
ence would not be "educational"
in nature, the President has hob-
bled the only chance GLF would
have had to truly work within the
system. Fleming has reinstituted
the curtain from which GLF was
attempting to emerge around.
From now on GLF is a political
issue, not a moral one.
NOWHERE HAS FLEMING said
he was sorry for what grief his
action might cause GLF. All he
talks of is "public support." In
his letter of June 12 he says GLF
can hold their conference else-
where. But where else can they
hold their conference except in
some lonely place where "normal
God-fearing" people will not be
disturbed by them. This isolation
will only heighten the problem.
Having been -banned f r o m this
campus, their image will be fur-
ther scarred, and yet another "lib-
eral" will have revealed his own
fallibility.
President Fleming many times
has said he is a man of firm be-
liefs. He should look once more
inside himself and see if he
doesn't see the ghost of Lyndon
Johnson - the man who tried to
satisfy everyone, and lost all in
the end.
-BMlL ALTERMAN

ahead as scheduled there would
have been little h a r d feelings.
GLF would have been grateful to
Fleming and the President in re-
turn might have learned some-
thing from the group. It g o e s
without saying that the confer-
ence would have promoted better
understanding between homosex-
uals and the community. For the
community it would have given
them first hand information of
something they had previously
read about in books. Homosexuals
themselves might have finally had
the opportunity to come out. of

FOR RENT
CAMPUS-Studio rooms-modern, $100
and under. Girls only. 761-7764. 34071
OWN ROOM
in 2 bdrm. apt. Male, Jr., Sr., Grad.
only. 12 mo. lease. Call Sam, 663-
5931, after 6 p.m. 35071
BASEMENT in 4-man house, 'use of
upstairs. $45/mo. and utilities. Phone
665-8047 after 6 p.m. 31071
2 BDRM. APTS. avail, for fall-For 2
from $210; for 3 from $225; for 4
from $240. New bldgs., units furnish-
ed, some with dishwasher. 663-1761.
26071
FURNISHED APARTMENTS
Campus-hospital area, 2 bdrms., park-
ing, laundry facilities, A/C, disposal.
769-2982. 27C71
REMODELED 2 BDRM. house for 2-4.
Aug. 31 occupancy. $13,000. 916 Brooks,
AA. 764-7557, 8-3:30. 761-9598 week-
ends. 32071
ROOMMATE NEEDED, $90/mo. 2 bdrm.
furnished. 663-0760. 25071
1 AND 2 BDRM. furn.,:ideal for 2-3
women, A/C, parking, near State and
packard. 769-7455 or 761-2423. 18071
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS
711'ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo, Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioningI
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36C71

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Plio7e 7i0
12 Noon Deadlne Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

LINES 1 day
2 1.00
3 ,1.10
4 1.35
5 1 55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 240
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 0.70

2 days
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

3 days
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

4 doys
3.00
4.05
4.05
4.65
6.35
7.20
7.90
8.70
9.30
9.30
17.85
25.50
33.45
41.40

5 days
3.65
4.85
5.90
6.90
7.85
8.85
9.75
10.65
11.35
11.35
21.75
31.15
40.95
51.15

6 days
4.20
5.65
6.90
8.05
9.25
10.40
11.45
12.60
13.60
13.30
25.40
36.65
48.30
60.50

UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES

add.
.60
.80
.95
1.15
1.30
1.45
1.55
1.70
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.80
1.Q0

FOR RENT
HOSPITAL AREA - Two bedroom. 4-
mtan, furntished, parking, individual
storage lockers, l audry facilities.
$215 per month includes Reat and
water. Campus Management, Inc., 662-
7787. 17Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 5oCtc
-TENTS-TENTS--TENTS
We need many tents for the first week
in Sept, Have a Tent? want some ex-
citement? Call us 10-5 763-3102. This
is as important as your apt. itself.
CD71
FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undercover parking. 1-864-3852.
50Ctc
DELUXE FURNISHED 4-man, 2 bdrm.,
close to campus, parking. 8 and 12
ma. lease. McDonnald, after 5, 662-
6156. 24071

Additional costs per day after six days.
Ads that are 11/,, 21/2, 31, etc. inch size will be billed at the
average of the lower and higher inch rate.

FOR RENT
VERY LARGE ROOM for male stu-
dent, no cooking. 668-6906.' 307
911 S. FOREST
Near Hill St.
Modern 2 bdrm., 3-man
Call 668-6906

LARGE 3 BDRM. house, 1 blk.
campus, 2 blks. from hospital,
mo. 761-9045.

37071
from
$325/
36071

SANS SOUCI1

APTS.

2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. l5Ctc
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Several beautifully decorated, fur-
nished, 2-bedroom, bi-level apts.
still available for fall semester.
Dishwashers e vacuum cleaners
1,z Baths * Air-Cond. * Balconies
Parking * Laundry and Storage
facilities 0 Excellent sound con-
ditioning. -
Call the Resident Manager at
761-1717 or 665-8825 or stop in
at the lobby office 12 noon to 6 p.m.
daily. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
761~-1717
iCte

"What else could we do? The concrete
encased nerve gas we dumped in the
ocean began to leak!"

NIGHT EDITOR: BILL.ALTERMAN

Findin
By DANIEL ZWERDLING
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is an up-
dated version of an article which ap-
peared in the Aug. 1 New Republic.)
GOVERNMENT officials are on-
ly beginning to g r a s p the
magnitude of the mercury pollu-
tion crisis which exploded in
March when the Canadians sud-
denly found lethal doses of the
chemical in Lake St. Clair fish.
One month later, Americans found
the Detroit River and Lake Erie
were full of the poison. Since then,
f o u r states - Michigan, Ohio,
Vermont, Alabama - have shut
down their lakes and rivers to
fishing, and at least sixteen other
states have found potentially dan-
gerous contamination levels in
their fish and drinking w a t e r.
Some investigators talk about de-
claring the entire Mississippi off
limits. There is even the specter
of widespread. contamination in
food crops and animals.
Hardly anyone in America had
bothered thinking about mercury
pollution before a Swedish doctor-
al student happened to take a
close look at the St. Glair fish.
Factories like the Dow Chemi-
cal Corp. on t he shores of St.
Clair have been dumping up to
200 pounds a day each for up to
forty years, building huge sludge
banks on river and lake bottoms,
where bacteria transform the in-

DDT

was only the

beginning

ert mnetal into lethal methyl mer-
cury which then concentrates in
fish. The public has been eating
the contaminated fish and drink-
ing the water for just as long,
symptoms such as muscle trem-
ors, nausea, nervousness and de-
pression -- only no one has diag-
nosed their cause.
SINCE T H E GOVERNMENT
first learned in March and April
about mercury pollution, it has
done little to stop the poison pour-
ing from the 46 identified factor-
ies across the country. Only on
July 14 d i d Interior Secretary
Walter Hickel warn that the gov-
ernment will t ak e "immediate"
and "aggressive" action against
any polluters, unless corrective-
measures are taken "swiftly" on
local levels. Michigan quickly hit
its major polluter, the Wynan-4
dotte Corp., with an injunction,
but the rest of the states have
done little but plead with the fac-
tories to reduce their mercury dis-
charge.
Until recently, the most aggres-
sive federal action has been a six-
month warning, under the 1965
Pollution Act, against the Analine
Film Corp. In New Jersey. For-
tunately, Analine has complied-
but under this statute, a 200
pound per day polluter like Dow
could dump 180 more t ons of
mercury before the government

could take action. Then, it might
take months of suits and appeals
before the justice department ev-
er could bring the pollution to a_-
halt. The best enforcement pos-
sibly lies under the Refuse Con=
trol Act, which permits the justice
department to seek immediate in-
junctions against polluters or
fines of up to $2500 per day. Jus-
tice officials could have filed in-
junctive suits against polluters on
their own long ago, as early as the
April Erie and Detroit river re-
ports, but they have doggedly in-
sisted on waiting for the interior
department. Two weeks ago Hick-
el finally requested action under
the Refuse Act against 13 major
companies. The justice depart-
ment filed suit against eight of.
them. That's at least a start.
Some factories have cut down
on their mercury discharge (In-
terior officials say the only ac-
ceptable level is no discharge at
all). But any legal action taken
against polluters won't do any-
thing about the tons of ,mercury
already lying on river and lake
bottoms, continually poisoning the
water and fish: mercury stays ac-
tive for centuries.
'WHILE CITIZENS across the
country wait anxiously- to see
whether their own neighborhood
stream has mercury pollution,

some authorities have raised the
possibility that mercury also poi-
sons us via the air, our food and
everyday products. The chemical
is used widely in hospitals, laun-
dries, paints and paper products;
it evaporates-easily and is absorb-
ed through the skin. Three chil-
dren in New Mexico suffered ir-
reversible brain damage in Feb-
ruary after eating a hog fed with
mercury-treated seed. Seed man-
ufacturers h a v e used mercurial
compounds for years to protect
vegetable, grain and fruit seeds
from fungi. Government officials
could have learned a lesson sev-
eral years ago when Sweden found
dead birds and wildlife poisoned
by mercurial seeds.
Sen. Philip H a r t (D-Mich.)
delved into this crisis July 29 and
30, in hearings before ,his Sen-
ate environmental subcomnmittee
and found that federal investiga-
tors are finding widespread lead
and arsenic poisoning too. Com-
mittee aides say they may ask the
President to use his powers of ex-
ecutive order to get anti-pollution
gears moving. "The mercury pol-
lution cuts across agency lines,"
notes a staff counsel. "We need
emergency action to fight it." One
immediate problem concerns the
thousands of fishermen wiped out
by the fishing bans, and the sea-
food restaurants forced to close or

Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
31ct%
NEED AN APARTMENT
AND/OR ROOMMATES?
MEET YOUR
MATCHMAKERS
Chris & Nancy .-. .
Who will help you select your
modern, bi-level apt.
Several furnished 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments still available at con-,
venient campus locations.
Dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, bal-
conies, 1% baths, air cond., park-
ing, laundry & storage facilities.
24 hour maintenance service.
CHARTER REALTY
665-8825
1335 S. University
9Ctc
BARGAIN CORNER
BARGAIN GOODBYES - Tables, desk
lamp, port. stereo, dishware, clothes,
LP records, books.. CHEAP. 769-0797.
9W7C
Samrt's Store
NEED LEVIS ?
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims .......6.50
Button-Fly.......6.50
Traditional.... .6.98
Bells ............7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SH I RTS.......249
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's ... 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's ........6.98
Nuvo's.....8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's Store
122 E. Washington

663-9373, 663-1002,
evenings, 665-0063
Roommates needed

FOR RENT
TWO BEDROOM, furnished unit, near
law and business schools. Please call
Professional Management Assoc., 769-
4227. 4Cte
TV RENTALS--Students only. $10.40/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
Ote
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Wall St.-Furnished, new, rnodern
1 and 2 bedrooms available. 1-864-
3852. l lCtc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2. 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30Ctc
GARAGES-May be locked, lease, 723
Packard near State. 15071
ANNOUNCING
Eastern Highlands
Exciting living in largest campus
luxury apartments.
* Fully furnished * two bedrooms
* one and half bathrooms * swim-
ming pool * air conditioning ® on
E1'U campus (just 6 miles from Ann
Arbor).
While they last these luxurious four-
man units are renting for only $245/
M O.
Call 483-7220 or 668-7517
HALL MANAGEMENT COMPANY
16071
ARBOR FOREST
721 S. FOREST
3,OR 4 MAN-2 BEDROOM
DELUXE UNITS
August 24 occupancy. Look at these
large, large, furnished units before
you rent. Deluxe furnishings with air
conditioning, large storage and park-
ing areas and resident manager. Many
extras. Inquhre at 721 S. Forest, Apt.
102 for viewing. (Need roommates?
Inquire). 29071

22071

HARITON
HOUSE
APARTMENTS
721-723 E. Kingsley
Fall rentals
2 bedroom
Hospital-campus location
Sound conditioned
Recreation room
Washing and drying facilities
Air conditioned
Off street parking
Large desk and shelves
Carpet and vinyl floors
Many other goodies
$248/month

2, 3, or 4man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
761-3576
1-864-3852

LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are look-
ing for? Tell them cheaply, yet effec-
tively in Daily classifieds, 764-0557.
11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. CD68
OBSERVATORY
CAMPUS NEAR HOSPITALS
Air-conditioned
Two-bedroom furnished
Wall-to-wall carpeting
Covered parking
$240.00 for 3 . .. $260.00 for 4
Includes heat and water,
Campus Management, Inc.
Open 'til 9 p.m.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
19Ctc
APARTMENTS CLOSE TO CAMPUS
N. Ingalls at Huron
Modern, 2 bdrm. units, furnished: $240-
$260 mo.; unfurnished: $200 mo.
Oakland-Hill Area
Modern, 2 bdrm.: $230 mo. Large 1
bdrm. suitable for 2-3 persons. un-
furnihed: $85rmo.; furnished: $205
mo. Call Middle Ma nr<;ement, 663-
5883, 9 to 5. 20071
CAMPUS
3 OR 4 MAN DELUXE, 2 BEDROOM
FURNISHED UNITS
Utilities (except-elctricity and phone)
provided. Quiet with scui rity lock
and intercom en trance system. iAmple
storage -and parkingq.
Phone days 769-1258, evenings 662-
5469 or apply at 347 Maynard for
appointment to see. August 24th oc-
cup'ncy. 30071
STATE STREET MANOR
1111 5. State Street

Ctc

BilliardExhibit~r
4 % J iy Ey *
sl
M M Y
f/
.. f

fire employes. Federal disaster aid
doesn't cover "man-made" or un-
natural" catastrophes, and une -
ployment compensation will ac-
count for only a fraction, of fish-
ermen's salaries.
Meanwhr1'p the public contin-
ues .to drink and eat food- which
contains unknown amounts of un-
diagnosed poisons. "There is so
much pollution," says one Inter-
ior official, "a n d we're finding
new things all the time."

"finally an apartment buik
Forest Terrac
1001 sOUl
Two bedrooms star
" fully furnished and carpet
* each apt. equipped with
* private parking free
* garbage disposals
* 24-hr. emergency mainter
* live-in resident manager
See TOM WRIGHT,
or Answering Ser

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