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August 18, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-18

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e iian DBatt
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The MichiaonsDailv express the individual
opinions at the author. This must be noted in all reorints.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 18, 1970 News Phone: 764-0552
One day,-rhetoric
won't be enough
EARLY LAST WEEK President Nixon vetoed two meas-
ures -- one concerned with education, the other with
housing -- because the bills appropriated one billion dol-
lars more than the nation's- budget asked for. A short
time later, the Senate, bowing to pressure from the White
House, voted to extend the Safeguard Antiballistic Sys-
tem (ABM), and spokesmen for the administration indi-
cated that the President was pleased by the bill's passage.
These two actions reveal the difference between Pres-
ident Nixon's stated positions and his actual actions. Re-
peatedly during his nineteen months in office, the Presi-
dent has emphasized his desire to achieve peace in the
world so that additional funds may be directed at the
country's pressing domestic needs; however, continually
during his term, members of, the administration as well
as the President himself have elected to concentrate on
war expenditures rather than domestic expenditures -
pleading inflation - as he has vetoed bills that would
have improved housing, hospitals and education.
If the President is so concerned about stopping the
rampant inflation, he could just as easily reduce expen-
ditures for defense - the $20 billion planned for ABM
would be a good start.
As things stand now the hopes of many citizens are
continually being raised and then dashed to the ground
simply because Mr. Nixon feels we can not afford the
funds to begin working on many of the domestic ills.
The President apparently feels that if he continues
to say he favors domestic reform, the nation will ignore
the fact that he is continuing to emphasize defense and
maximize the influence of the military-industrial com-
plex. So far these policies have worked, but the power of
rhetoric eventually failed Lyndon Johnson. It may yet
fail Richard Nixon.
-PHILIP HERTZ
NIGHT EDITOR: ERIKA HOFF

Tuesday, August 18, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.JAMES WECHSLER-
Straddling the fence:
Goldberg vs Rockefeller

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

ARTHUR GOLDBERG has won
the first psychological round
in the gubernatorial battle. The
bookmakers have pronounced him
the underdog - with the odds
running nearly 2-1 in Gov. Rock-
efeller's favor. According to near-
ly every modern school of political
strategy, the posture of early fav-
orite is, to put it simply, unfavor-
able, and the Governor was quick
to disparage the appraisal of the
gambling fraternity.
But apart from all other con-
siderations, there is one very tan-
gible reason for the advance es-
timates. The word is around that
Goldberg is facing an acute short-
age of campaign funds with no
prospect of any miracle relief.
In part the problem is not uni-
que to his campaign. In fact the
diminution in available campaign
resources, reflecting the stock
market decline and general finan-
cial uncertainity, is being felt by
candidates in m a n y areas and
m a y prove a critical factor in
close races.
But the impact of the develop-
ment may be pecularily heavy in
contests where one candidate -
in this instance Gov. Rockefeller
- confronts no threat of finan-
cial deprivation. It is assumed
that he will conduct his campaign
in the style to which he has been
accustomed. In 1966, Rockefeller
recorded expenditures of $5.2 mil-
lion; Goldberg's suporters see no
possibility of raising half t h a t
amount and, by present indica-
tions, may fall significantly below
$2 million while Rockefeller ex-
ceeds all h i s previous budgets.
Dick Ottinger's Senate campaign
will be well-financed, as was his
primary, but it will produce no
necessarily large dividends for the
head of the ticket.
THE FISCAL DISPLAY may
partially explain why the book-
makers have been unimpressed by
private polls that still show Gold-
berg in the lead (although by con-
siderably less than when his can-
didacy was first projected).

On the other hand it is con-
ceivable that the heavy thinkers
in Las Vegas may be underesti-
mating the ideological dilemmas
facing t h e Rockefeller camp.
These could become steadily more
acute. They could conceivably
matter more than money.
A recent report of private ne-
gotiations for an entente cordiale
between the Rockefeller forces
and the Conservative Party spon-
sors of the Senate candidacy of
James Buckley evoked swift de-
nial from the Governor and even
provided the widely - advertised
Rockefeller harmony meeting with
Sen. Goodell. Yet, as the cam-
p a i g n progresses, Rockefeller-
Buckley promoters are likely to
become increasingly visible.
For Rockefeller must regard the
possibility of a major Conserva-
tive Party defection- - spreading
from the Senate to the guberna-
torial 1 i n e "- as the potential
nightmare of 1970. Presumably
the dominant pressures on him
are to appease that flank. In that
sector the litmus test will be his
attitude toward t h e Nixon Ad-
ministration.
IN APPARENT anticipation of
that awkwardness, the Governor
has suggested that the contestants
concentrate on "state issues." But
can he effectively maintain that
posture if the Vietnam war drags
on, the economy lags a n d this
state - like all other states - re-
mains a victim of federal under-
nourishment in large measure
attributable to those conditions?
When the debate is forced into
those realms - as it will be - the
Governor is likely to find Gold-
berg a far more articulate, ani-
mated campaigner than he was in
a primary in which he detected
no great fighting issues.
He will also be tormented by
harsh decisions as to how he can
placate and sedate the right with-
out fatally losing the liberal sup-
port that gave him the margin of
victory in h i s previous battles.
How difficult this task can be he

has already been illustrated by his
labored comments on Cambodia.
IN SHORT, barring_ some ex-
traordinary changes in the world
and the nation between now and
autumn, Rockefeller will be haunt-
ed by the shadow of Richard Nix-
on and Spiro Agnew. Whateer
his other troubles, Goldberg has
no equivalent political crises on
his own side. There are no con-
flicts of serious substance between
the Democratic and Liberal plat-
forms, nor is Goldberg's endorse-
ment of Ottinger destined to cause
him any embarassment with Lib-
eral Party voters because of their
party's support of Goodell.
In 1968, despite all the Demo-
cratic agonies of that year, Hu-
bert Humphrey was able to carry
New York State by nearly 400,000
votes. Certainly Mr. Nixon's ap-
peal - or lack of it to New York
voters can hardly be equaled with
Gov. Rockefeller'sbdemonstrated
vote-getting prowess in New York.
But can the Governor successfully
differentiate himself from Mr.
Nixon without inviting a head-on
collision with the Conservatives?
Or must he in fact give asteadily
higher priority to the wooing of
the Buckley-bent bloc? Is there
any tightrope strong enough to
sustain him or will he be caught
in midair, his convictions, o n e
might say, blurred by suspended
sentences?
There is at least a chance that
the bookies may be revisingtheir
form charts as the campaign gets
underway.
@New York Post
Letters to the Editor should
be mailed to the Editorial Di-
rector or delivered to Mary
Rafferty in the Student Pub-
lications business office in the
Michigan Daily building. Let-
ters should be typed, double-
spaced and normally should not
exceed 250 words. The Editorial
Directors reserve the right to
edit all letters submitted.

FOR RENT
BASEME1,r in 4-man house, use of
upstairs. $45/mo. and utilities. Phone
665-8047 after 6 p.m. 31071
ROOMS FOR FALL
Girls-Commute from Ypsi and save.
Double rooms, kitchens, TV room,
date room, co-op living, near bus to
AA. $55/mo. 482-0407. 23071
2 BDRM. APTS. avail, for fall--For 2
from $210; for 3 from $225; for 4
from $240. New bldgs., units furnish-
ed, some with dishwasher. 663-1761.
26071
FURN ISHED APARTMENTS
Campus-hospital area, 2 bdrms., park-
ing, laundry' facilities, A/C, disposal.
769-2982. 27071
STATE STREET MANOR
1111 S. State Street
2, 3, or 4 man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
761-3576
1-864-3852
Cte
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo. Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36071

FOR RENT

REMODELED 2 BDRM. house for 2-4.
Aug. 31 occupancy. $13,000. 916 Brooks,
AA. 764-7557, 8-3:30. 761-9598 week-
ends. 32071
ROOM, private bath, for mature or
grad student girl who likes a pleasant
home, all year swimming privileges,
meals if desired - on co-op basis.
Phone 662-5855. 2807-1
ROOMMATE NEEDED, $90/mo. 2 bdrm.
furnished. 663-0760. 25071
1 AND 2 BDRM. furn., ideal for 2-3
women, A/C, parking, near State and
Packard. 769-7455 or 761-2423. 18C71
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Several beautifully decorated, fur-
nished, 2-bedroom, bi-level apts.
still available for fall semester,
Dishwashers * Vacuum cleaners
1, Baths * Air-Cond. 9 Balconies
Parking 0 Laundry and Storage
facilities * Excellent sound con-
ditioning.
Call the Resident Manager at
761-1717 or 665-8825 or stop in
at the lobby office 12 noon to 6 p.m.
daily, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
761-1717
llctc

HAR ITON
HOUSE
APARTMENTS
721-723 E. Kingsley
Fall rentals
2 bedroom
Hospital-campus location
Sound conditioned
Recreation room
Washing and drying facilities
Air conditioned
Off street parking
Largetdesk and shelves
Carpet and vinyl floors
Many other goodies
$248/month

SANS SOUCI

APTS.

You still can go under the

big top

Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
31Ct
NEED AN APARTMENT
AND/OR ROOMMATES?
MEET YOUR
MATCHMAKERS
Chris & Nancy .
Who will help you select your
modern, bi-level apt.
Several furnished 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments still available at con-
venient campus locations.
Dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, bal-
conies, 1% baths, air cond., park-
ing, laundry & storage facilities.
24 hour maintenance service."
CHARTER REALTY
665-8825
1335 S. University

LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are look-
ing for? Tell them cheaply, yet effec-
tively in Daily classifieds, 764-0557,
11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. CD68
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
GARAGES-May be locked, lease, 723
Packard near State. 15071
TENTS--TENTS-TENTS
We need many tents for the first week
in Sept.-Have a Tent? Want some ex-
citement? Call us 10-5 763-3102. This
is as important as your apt. itself.
CD71

663-9373, 663-1002,
evenings, 665-0063
Roommates needed

22C71

FOR RENT
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc, 663-
6448. 15Ctc
DELUXE FURNISHED 4-man, 2 bdrm.,
close to campus, parking. 8 and 12
mo. lease. McDonnald, after 5, 662-
6156. 24071
TWO BEDROOM, furnished unit, near
law and business schools. Please call
Professional Management Assoc., 769-
4227. 4Ctc
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Neja, 662-5671.
Cte
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 WallSt.-Furnished, new, modern
1 and 2 bedrooms available. 1-864-
3852. 11ct
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2, 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30tc
OBSERVATORY
CAMPUS NEAR HOSPITALS
Air-conditioned
Two-bedroom furnished
Wall-to-wall carpeting
Covered parking
$240.00 for 3... $26000 for 4
Includes heat and water.
Campus Management, Inc.
Open 'til 9 p.m.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
9ctc
ARBOR FOREST
721 S. FOREST
3 OR 4 MAN-2 BEDROOM
DELUXE UNITS
August 24 occupancy. Look at these
large, large, furnished units before
you rent. Deluxe furnishings with air
conditioning, large storage .and park-
ing areas and resident manager. Many
extras. Inquire at 721 S. Forest, Apt.
102 for viewing. (Need roommates?
Inquire). 29C71
APARTMENTS CLOSE TO CAMPUS
N. Ingalls at Huron
Modern, 2 bdrm. units, furnished: $240-
$260 mo.; unfurnished: $200 mo.
Oakland-Hill Area
Modern, 2 bdrm $230 mo. Large 1
bdrm. suitable for 2-3 persons, un-
furnished: $185 mo.; furnished: $205
mo. Call Middle Management, 663-
5883, 9 to 5. 20071
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED - RIDE to Washington, D.C.
Would like to leave Ann Arbor
around August 20th. Will share ex-
penses. Call Bill Alterman at the
Daily, 764-0552. GD70
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
CHIARMING OLD PIANO-TUNED
Great shape, will negotiate. 761-2743.
18X71
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Unavailable instruments, repairs and
instructions-209 S. State, 665-8001. X
GIBSON CLASSIC (unfinished) guitar.
$140/ best offer. Call 769-0024. XD7O
we V p" Ic s A ' o ti l W
b11o\ \V
Ghec
be
UC

BIKES AND SCOOTERS
FOR SALE-1968 Harley Sportster-Best
offer. Call 761-4983. 1Z71
BSA 441cc SHOOTING STAR, 1968, new
in 1969. Best offer over $700, includes
tools, helmets, insurance. 769-1123.
50Z71
-69 350 HONDA SCRAMBLER-Excel lent
condition, owned by Honda mechanic.
6-12 p.m., 662-9738. ZD71
1970% HONDA 450. 761-3905. 46Z71
1970 KAWASAKI, 500 Mach III, 850, 3
months old. 482-5776. 47Z69
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26271
ROOMMATES WANTED
MALE GRAD needs 3 roommates to
complete 4-man, Campus - Hospital
area, Call Ben at 662-4909, 5-7 p.m.
19Y71
FEMALE GRAD roommate wanted,
Magnif. 2 bdrm., A/C, furn. apt. over-
looking river. Call 769-7019. 20Y71
SHARE BDRM. in mod. 2-bdrm., 3-man.
close. $75/mo. 663-2537. 21Y71
FOURTH FEMALE roommate needed for
fall. Modern apartment-cheap-cam-
pus/hospital location. Call Nancy,
453-6095 after 3 p.m. 3Y69
GRAD NEEDS 1 male grad, shareapt.
$60/mo. 715 E, Ann, NO 8-6735 or
872-2193, 9-12 p.m. 18Y69
SEEKING 2 science students with some
tolerance for disorder to share a near
campus apt., chem. or biol. preferred.
No lease, $48/mo. each (util. includ-
ed). 665-2673 1-2 p.m. 12Y71
SHARE 2 BDRM. APT, with one other.
Private entrance, behind SAB. 761-
6310. 17Y70
NEED FEMALE to complete modern
fall 4-man on S. State. $67.50/mo./
man plus utilities. Call Cindy, 769-
7238. 6Y71
WANTED.-2 or 3 giris to fill apart-
ment. 662-9807 or 769-4344 after 3
p.m. 7Y69
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3 bdrm.
apt. with 2 girls. $70/mo. Available
Aug. 15. Write Sue Brand, 6530 Hud-
son Pkwy., Cincinnati, Ohio 45213.
NEED 2 GIRLS to complete 4-man apt,
Mod., air-cond., parking. On Fuller
Rd., near med center. Call after 6:
662-6927. 9Y71
FOURTH GIRL needed. Four blocks to
campus. Modern, $60/mo. Call 769-
5412 evenings. 10Y69
2 GIRLS NEEDED to fill vacant bdrm.
in new 4-man apt., 8 mo. lease. 769-
3571 or 665-3158. 11Y71

IS
C
1
1

Y(
l
1
F

PARTY TIMJ

By RICHARD L. ARKIN
WHILE HUNDREDS of thous-
ands of rock fans grooved at
Goose Lake and 10,000 blues lov-
ers filled the Huron Highlands
last weekend, nearly 8,000 Ann
Arbor circus freaks swarmed
across town to two performances
of the Clyde Beatty-Cole B r o s.
Circus - the last major tented
circus still touring in the U.S.
This was a real old-timey cir-
cus with a big top and a side-
show and a steam calliope. It was
not the antiseptic, air-conditioned
arena show that promoters have
been passing off as circus-for the
past few years. It was -three rings
under canvas, on grass and saw-
dust and straw, with a big top
bigger than a football field. It
was filled with lions and tigers,
aerialists and clowns, jugglers and

risley artists, tightrope walkers
and bally broads, dogs and ponies,
teeterboard acrobats and trapeze
flyers, and two dozen performing
elephants. Banner - line posters
with vivid illustrations of the
freaks, sword-swallowers and fire
eaters in the sideshow lined the
midway, while hawkers and bally-
hoo artists exhorted the crowd to
see the wonderous sights inside
the magic tents. And throughout
the day and evening, the circus
band blared on.
ONCE THERE WERE hundreds
of shows like this one - Sells-
Floto, Hagenbeck-Wallace, Mills
Bros., Hunt Bros., the Great Fore-
paugh, and Ringling Brothers-
Barnum and Bailey. But Ring-
ling, now j u s t a shadow of its
former -self, has exchanged tra-

dition for a kind of Las Vegas
slickness, and has dumped its big
tent to appear in sanitized, mod-
ernized, plasticized and abbre-
viated form in sterile air condi-
tioned arenas and halls. All the
others are gone - all but this one
and a handful of tiny competitors
that tour under canvas, striving
to keep the true circus tradition
alive.
Although Clyde Beatty is dead
now, the show that b e a r s his
name still prospers, despite $10,-
000-a-day costs and a shortage of
good performers and dependable
roustabouts. Every April the show
moves out of Florida on a fleet of
nearly a hundred trucks and
trailers - no more circus trains-
and in the next 40 weeks, travels
more than 12,000 miles as it tours
the cities and towns of the East,
Midwest and South. Each day, the
circus moves into a new town,
sets up its tents, gives two per-
formances, tears down, loads its
equipment and animals, a n d
drives to another stand 50 to 250
miles down the road.
LATE LAST THURSDAY night,
300 showmen and tons of equip-
ment of t h e Beatty-Cole circus
slipped into town. By late morn-
ing, nearly '20,000 square yards of
canvas had been reeled off mas-
sive spool trucks and had risen
over a grassy field at Packard and
Carpenter Roads. The 150 by 300
foot big top, which' rises 55 feet
into the air, was at the center of
the lot, surrounded by the cook
tent, the sideshow tent, the clown
alley, dressing tents, concession
stands, trailers, trucks and wa-
gons, and two diesel power gen-
erators. The cook tent had been
the first to go up and would be
the first to leave that night, and
early in t h e morning, delivery
trucks f r o m Washtenaw county

Summit
Associates
CHOICE
LOCATIONS
AVAILABLE
2-4 MAN
APARTMENTS

9Ctc

BARGAIN CORNER
BARGAIN GOODBYES - Tables, desk
lamp, port. stereo, dishware, clothes,
LP records, books. CHEAP. 769-0797.
9W7c
SamS' Store
NEED LEVIS ?
VISIT
US
FOR
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Super Slims.......6.50
Button-Fly ........6.50
Traditional.......6.98
Bells...........7.50

grocers dropped off the massive
quantities of food to be- cooked for
the hundreds of circus people.
Elephants in working harnesses
provide the muscle to raise the
tent on its four massive center
poles, while 50 quarter poles in
two rows around them help to
bear the weight of the canvas to
the 72 poles along the sidewalls.
400 stakes driven into the ground
anchor the big tent, while eight
miles of rope steady it and give it
flexibility in wind and rain.
Circus families like the Suarez
troop from Mexico, who work the
liberty horses, and the Ferreiras
from Colombia, who do a perch
balancing act, have traditionally
dominated American shows. Acts
were handed down from genera-
tion to generation, and when a
family outgrew an act, it would
break up into two or more groups,
sometimes doing similar turns for
competing shows, or often per-
fecting additional skills and doing

different acts in the same show.
Even marriage was dominated by
the circus, with the choice of hus-
band or wife being largely deter-
mined by the families of the pros-
pective candidates on the ability
of the intended to fit into the
family act, and with the kids be-
ing pressed into service sometimes
even before they could walk.
FOR 150 YEARS; tented circus-
es have toured America. O n c e
there were many; now there are
only a few. Perhaps someday they
will exist only in memory. But
for now, Clyde Beatty-Cole Bros.
Circus still carries its unique
magic from town to town, setting
up its tent city on an open field,.
casting its spell upon thousands of
children, then folding up its tents,
and vanishing into the night,
leaving only peanut shells, pop-
corn boxes, the faint odor of ele-
phants and tigers, and the hollow
echo of a child's laughter.

761-8055
33071
FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undercover parking. 1-864-3852.
50Ctc
HOSPITAL AREA -- Two bedroom, 4-
man, furnished, parking, individual
storage lockers, laundry facilities.
$215 per month includes heat and
water. Campus Management, Inc., 662-
7787. 17Ctc
CAMPUS
3 OR 4 MAN DELUXE, 2 BEDROOM
FURNISHED UNITS
Utilities (except electricity and phone)
provided. Quiet with security lock
and intercom entrance system. Ample
storage and parking.
Phone days 769-1258, evenings 662-
5469 or apply at 347 Maynard for
appointment to see. August 24th oc-
cupancy. _0C71
ANNOUNCING
Eastern Highlands-
Exciting living in largest campus
luxury apartments.
* Fully furnished 0 two bedrooms
* one, and half bathrooms * swim-
ming pool * air conditioning * on
EMU campus (just 6 miles from Ann
Arbor).
While they last these luxurious four-
man units are renting for only $2451'
ma.
Call 483-7220 or 668-7517
HALL MANAGEMENT COMPANY
.16C71

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Resident manager: 761-1717
Managed by CHARTER

Nuvo's.........

Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam s Store
122 E. Washington-

AUSTIN
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1209 . University

663-7151

i

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