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August 18, 1970 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-18
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, August 18, 1970

Tuesday, August 18, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Government files suit

to secure age

WASHINGTON (P) - The
government yesterday filed suit
against Idaho and Arizona,
seeking a Supreme Court test
of the 18-year-old vote and two
other provisions of the 1970 vot-
ing rights act early in October.
The J u s t i c e Department,
which filed the suits, did not
Se ekan immediate decision. The
court does not come back into
session until October 5.
The Michigan Daily. edited and man-
a'ed by sudents at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
C Liss ot;,ge paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
ga,420 M aynard St., Ann Arbor,
Nicrlgan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through sunday morning Univer-
r11y year. subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, F10 by mall.
Simmer Sessiorn. published Tuesday
through saturday morning, Subscrip-
tion rate: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.

However, the department ask-
ed the court to issue an inter-
im order which would allow il-
literate persons in the 14 states
which have literacy tests to reg-
ister for the November 3 gen-
eral elections.
Both Idaho and Arizona in-
formed the department earlier
this month they would not com-
ply with the lower voting age
or the b a n on literacy tests.
Idaho, in addition, refused to
change its residency require-
ments to conform with the uni-
form 30-day period for presi-
dential elections established by
the bill.
The states of Texas and Ore-
gon already have filed suit in
the Supreme Court, seeking to
prevent the Justice Department
from enforcing the controver-
sial provisions.
The suits both by and against
the government are part of the
legal backgrounding intended to
p ' 1

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A three - piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus french fries.
Larger take-home orders also. Try
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E M i S R S
West SfDY ArborlnC
West of Arborland

MAGIC
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8 vote
result in a test of the new law's
constitutionality.
The suspension of literacy
tests went into effect when
President Nixon signed the new
law June 22. The 18-year-old
voting provision does not take
effect until January 1, 1971.
In a related development, a
suit was filed in U.S. District
Court here, claiming that youths
in Puerto Rico and the Virgin
Islands were denied due pro-
cess because those territories
were not included under t h e
18-year-old vote law.
The suit, which named Atty.
John N. Mitchell as defendant,
contended that the exclusion of
18-year-old youths in both ter-
ritories deprived them of their
First Amendment rights.
The government suit against
Arizona covers 18-year-old vot-
ing and suspension of the state's
literacy test. The suit against
Idaho deals with the lower vot-
ing age and that state's resi-
dency requirement.
In one effort to speed up a
Supreme Court decision on the
matter, the Justice Department
asked the court to order Idaho
and Arizona to file responses
within two weeks, and sought a
schedule for submitting briefs
that would allow consideration
of the case by the High Court
in October.
The department estimated
last week that 24 of the 48
states with minimum voting
ages o v e r 18 would go along
with the 18-year-old test.
Ten of the 14 states with lit-
eracy tests indicated they would
drop the requirement, three said
they would not and New Hamp-
shire gave an indefinite re-
sponse.
Daily Official Buletin
Day Calendar
Tuesday, August 18
CIC and Center for South and South-
east Asian Studies Lecture - Dr. N. G.
Barrier, University of Missouri, "Un-
tapped Source Materials on South As-
ia": 200 Lane Hall, 3:00 p.m.
Music for the Disadvantaged Student
Lecture - Mrs. Ollie McFarland, Sup-
ervisor, Elementary School Music, De-
roit Public Schools, lecturer: 2043 Sch.
of Music, 3:30 p.m.
Inst. of Cont. Legal Ed. - Standard
Jury Instructions Workshop - Regis-
tration, Rackham Lobby, 6:00 p.m.
Opera - Puccini's Gianni Schicchi
and- Martinu's comedy on the Bridge-
Josef Blatt, conductor and Ralph Her-
bert, stage Fdirector: Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8:00 p.m..
Degree Recital - Elaine Zajac, saxo-
phone: School of Music Recital Hall,
8:00 p.m.
Degree Recital - Patrick McCreeless,
>rgan: Hill Aud., 8:00 p.m.

WOMEN'S RIGHTS:
Ervin to propose
substitute measure
WASHINGTON (R - Sen. Sam J. Ervin (D-NC) un-
veiled a substitute yesterday for the proposed constitutional
amendment approved by the House a week ago to guarantee
equal rights for women under federal and state laws.
Ervin, who plans to introduce his substitute tomorrow
after giving colleagues a chance to join as co-sponsors,
said the House-passed measure would require Congress and
the state legislatures to make all laws apply to men and
women in identical fashion "no matter how irrational or
unreasonable such application may be."
Like the amendment approved -----
by the House by an overwhelm-
ing vote, Ervin's substitute pro- e
vides that equality of rights un-t
der the law shall riot be denied
or abridged on account of sex.
But in addition, it would l
specifically exempt women froma
compulsory military service and
permit the passage any any law#
"reasonably designed to pro-
mote the health, safety, privacy,
education, or economic welfare
of women, or to enable them to WASHINGTON (P) - S e n,
perform their duties as home- George McGovern (D-SD) said
makers or mothers." yesterday he is modifying his
In a letter to fellow senators sedahe is mdifyinh
urging support of his substitute, way calculated to pick up the
Ervin said he is in accord with Senate votes needed td pass it,
the objective of invalidating all
laws "which make invidious or McGovern spoke at a news
unfair discriminations against conference after Vice President
women." Spiro T. Agnew told a Miami
"Laws of this character ought Beach, Fla., audience that the
to be invalidated," he said, "and amendment would bring mili-
are probably now invalidated by tary defeat and a blood bath in
the recent interpretations plac- South Vietnam..
ed upon the equal protection McGovern said Agnew had re-
acted in panic.
clause of the 14th Amendment." The changes McGovern plans
But Ervin said the House-ap- in the amendment would move
proved amendment goes further the date for troop withdrawal
and would invalidate all federal back six months to Dec. 31, 1971.
and state laws making any dis- He said another change would
tinctions between men and call on the President to submit
within 60 days after the amend-
women, ment passes a list of problems

WASHINGTON {P) - The
Public Health Service (PHS)
said yesterday 16 per cent of
969 water systems tested last
year were potentially hazardous.
Another 25 per cent deliver-
ed drinking water rated infer-
ior by federal standards.
The tests were conducted in
eight metropolitan areas a n d
the state of Vermont to deter-
mine wholesomeness of the pub-
lic drinking supply.
The results justify "real con-
cern over the ability of most
systems to deliver adequate sup-
plies of safe water in the fu-
ture," s a i d James H. McDer-
mott, director of t h e Federal
Bureau of Hygiene.
The 1969 survey found that
COOL d4*fiW j
1214 S. University
Information 8 6416
Ending Wednesday
Grand Prize Winner
Cannes Film Festival
"BALLAD OF
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and
MARIA SCHELL
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Two Gallic Flippiancies
"THE BED"
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ENDING THURSDAY

900,000 of 18.2 million people in
the sample area received poten-
tially hazardous water. Anoth-
er 2 million drink inferior wa-
ter.
Potentially hazardous is de-
fined as failing t h e govern-
ment's least stringent health
standards for chemical and bac-
terial purity.
From the health standpoint,
PHS views a potentially haz-
ardous water supply as one that
should be abandoned or up-
graded because persons have
either become ill or are likely to
become sick from drinking the
water.
The illness can range from
short-term bacterial infections
of the digestive tract to long
term poisoning with such chem-
icals as arsenic and lead.
Inferior means failure to
meet the most stringent stand-
ards.
Inferior water is s a f e, but
may have a bad taste, odor or
appearance, the Public Health
Service said.
The water systems of small
cities and villages were found
the most often seriously sub-
standard.
The most frequent causes of
the potentially hazardous label
were bacterial contamination
and excessive lead from pipes
in the system or home.
Hazardous quantities of ar-
senic, cadmium, chromium, ber-
ium, floride, and selenium also
were found.
The survey uncovered numer-
ous instances of badly struct-
ured and maintained water sys-
tems, of infrequent water sani-
tation and sampling, and of
poorly trained personnel.

Included in the survey were
all water systems in Vermont
and those serving the standard
metropolitan statistical areas of
New York City, Charleston,
S.C., Charleston, W. Va., Cin-
cinnati, Kansas City, New Or-
leans, Pueblo, Colo., and San
Bernardino - Riverside - Ontar-
io, Calif.
Migrants in
jail without
seeing. judge
BRIDGETON, N.J. (/P) -
Hundreds of migrant workers
have b e e n jailed in southern
New Jersey without ever seeing
a judge, antipoverty lawyers
said yesterday.
Max Rothman, director of
the farm worker division of the
Camden Regional Legal Servic-
es, a federally funded antipov-
erty agency, charged that farm-
ers are intimidating workers
with the threat of arrest.
Farmers, however, say the
complaints are not correct.
Rothman and two fellow at-
torneys working with the labor-
ers said migrants arrested on
minor charges often are requir-
ed to post bail they cannot af-
ford.
Rothman said that farmers
who hire migrants often control
the rural municipal councils
here and through that control
can influence local police de-
partments.
FOX VILLAGE
375No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300
MON.-FRI. 8:15 ONLY
SAT.-SUN. 1:45-5:00-8:30

POTENTIAL HAZARD:

Drinking water fails
government standards

Needs a Home
Living/Working Space
FOR 15 PEOPLE
769-7353

-S
.news
L 4 vt* e ** e**
By The As
PRESIDENT NIXON is ser
ion of the nation's foreign oil
of an overhaul of the present qu
On the recommendation of (
fice of Emergency Preparedness,
tion of a plan which would havt
import quotas to private oil comp
The tariff system, recommei
Cabinet-level task force, would h
ness to any companies willing to p
THE ENTIRE PACIFIC FL
the northern quarter of South
to sidetrack what may be a big
Despite the 3,000 tons of bo
fortresses on suspected Communi
maintained the barrage of morta
the north since Sunday.
Most of the shellings, about
mese artillery battalion less tha
O'Reilly, one of the bases used to
k
THE SOVIET UNION laun
to Venus yesterday, continuing
in deep space exploration after
The Russians claim to have
fiery planet while the Americans
goes well, the Soviets' Venus 7
months to complete its 217 millio
*
ROUGH SAILING WEAT:
scuttling of an aging Liberty s
nerve gas today, cleared last nig:
The tug Elizabeth Moran, w]
and three escort vessels had en
choppy waves as they headed for
283 miles east of Cape Kennedy, F
PRESIDENT NIXON signe
to control prices, rents, wages
didn' request and doesn't want.
The authority was injected b
Defense Production Act until June
Congress insisted on empow
levels no lower than those prevai
and pay, even though the Presid
use the authority.
DOUBLE FEATURE.-
"WHA T A DELIG-
LOUD A T SEX!"
"A Fun Film Abou
Really Was Fun Ci
,oo~ooooo
THE N'00C
oooo~oCULDRb
with ELL
Jason Robards

I

1

Join The Daily
Sports Staff

Barber
Billiards
Bowling

UNION
MICHIGAN
Open During
Exams & Break

General Notices
Grade sheets for Spring-Summer and
Summer Half, 1970= have been sent to
departments for distribution to instruc-
tors. All grade sheets should be submit-
ted within five days of the examina-
tion, and no later than Wednesday,
August 26 at 12:00 Noon. A grade mes-
senger service will be provided on a
regular basis by the Office of the Reg-
istrar to departmental offices on the
Central Campus beginning Friday,
August 21 an d continuing through
12:00 Noon on Thursday, August 27.
Grades may also be submitted directly
to the Office of the Registrar at "Win-
dow A," L. S. & A. Building during
working hours. Questions pertaining to
grade reports may be directed to 764-
6292.
Student Identification Cards - Any
student identification card marked
valid summer, spring, or winter 1970
only must be replaced before the stu-
dent may register for the Fall term,
1970. Replacement of this card maybe
accomplished by making application at
"Window A" in the L. S. & A. Build-
ing prior to August 28, 1970. Proper
(Continued on Page 8)

and suggestions of how best to
carry it out.
He said this step would "help
get a dialogue going" between
White House and Congress on
foreign policy, a step he said is
vital in view of a breakdown of
mutual understanding between
the two branches.
The senator said that at pre-
sent he can count on only
anotherdozen votes fOr the pro-
posal which calls for complete
withdrawal of all American
forces from Indochina.
He said also he will make his
amendment apply to simultan-
eous withdrawal from Cam-
bodia, South Vietnam and Laos.
McGovern said that a drive
to publicize his amendment
through paid television' com-
mercials has been all but sty-
mied by the refusal of television
networks and stations to carry
them,

I ,'

NAiim L tRLKM iMiUrittPRnim
JAMES STEWART
HENRY FONDA
'THE CHEYENNE SOCIALCWB
SHIRLEY JONES
SUE ANE LANGDON
5(gTECMICOI.0R PANAYISIMII

"CONSIDERABLE FUN ...
A PLOT THAT TWISTS AND
TURNS IN THE MANNER
OF A JAMES BOND SAGA"
Ken Barnard, Detroit News
SAMUEL GOLDWYN, JR.
GODFREY RAYMOND CALVIN
CAM~BRI96E SI JACQUES [GQIKHART
COLOR by Deluxe" United Artists
NOW SHOWING
SHOWS AT:
1-3-5-7-9:05 P.M.
231P . STATE ST.
Program Information 662-6264

lo
-Alh, A ,"

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-I

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Ed. Students Advising Office
COUNSELORS NEEDED
2 hrs./week commitment
Possible credit and/or money

I

Hairstyling
To Please
NOW 4 SHOPS
ARBORLAND
MAPLE VILLAGE
LIBERTY OFF STATE
EAST UNIV. AT SO. UNIV.

FRIDAY
JULIE ANDREWS
in "DARLING LILI"

loft Cefiwyfox present~s
GEORGIGE KARL
t'. S(OT)Y/ MALI)EN
PG.. Ea9 .-A ~vOpNBad

I'

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.....---.

m

CALL: Marnie Heyn, 769-7353
Madelyn Campbell, 769-7683

or 2012 SEB
763-3503

THE DASCOLA BARBERS

11

"finally an apartment building the student can afford"
Forest Terrace Apartments
1001 SOUTH FOREST
Two bedrooms starting at only $265.00
" fully furnished and carpeted modern two bedroom apts.
* each apt. equipped with its own burglar alarm system

'--
TV RENTALS
$10 per month
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIt REQUIRED-
CALL:
Nejac TV Rentals-
662-5671
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

Park
Terrace
848 Tappan
at Oakland
See Tom or Bonnie Woods
Apt. 10, 769-5014
or answering service, 769-7779

ALSO

Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Parts
t BALL JOINTS
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i TIE ROD ENDS

SEE
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private parking free
garbage disposals
24-hr emergency maintenance service
live-in resident manager to handle all your problems
See TOM WRIGHT, Apt. 211, 769-6374
or Answering Service at 769-7779,

"the ultimate in campus living"
* delux one-two-three bedroom apartments
* garbage disposals fully furnished and carpeted
* locked storage *+private underground parking free
* resident manager " 24-hr. emergency maintenance service
0 each apartment equipped with its own burglar alarm system

oFiPTH Forum]
I.T. 'V~fv* MLOERTy
DOWNTOWN ANN ^".0RA
MFOFNMAT#CN 761-970U

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Luis Bunuel's "BELLE
"END OF THE R

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