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August 15, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-08-15
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Page Six 4

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fHE MICHIGAN* DAILY

4.

Saturday, August 15, 1970

Saturday, August i, 1970

a

*rHE MICHIGANDAILY

41

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<<

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
Monday through Friday, 12:00-2:00

ill
I

1'.

s!

HELP WANTED I
FIGHT WATER POLLUTION - Five
openings full or part time. Manage-
ment-high income potential. Marian
Ottow, 4310 Mill St., Grandville,
Mich. 40H70
ttOOM AND BOARD in exchange for
15 hrs. housework weekly (cook sup-
per. ironing, etc.) Mon.-Fri. Weekends
off. Transportation needed. 663-2379
or 764-0497. 41H71
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Full or part tie. Apply 208 W. Huron.
32H71
ATTENTION STUDENT HUSBANDS
Put voir wives to work (full or part
timie), applications now being taiken
for PHT (putting hubby through).
Inquire today, 971-8700. 39H71
WANTED - Live-in help for retired
University coiuple, housekeeping and
some nursing, care, individual or
couple, pleasant living quarters. 668-
7144 mornings or evenings. 3611711
BABYSITTER 3-5 hrs./day, 3-5 days a
week. 971-7364. 371171
WANTED - Male undergrad to assist
professor in wheelchair in return for
room and board. 761-9034 after 5.
381171
Registered Nurse
Day shift in modern, pleasant, extended
care facility. 761-3800, 35H71
BARMAIDS
Full or part time. Apply 208 W. Huron.
31H171
USED CARS
1967 TEMPEST - 2 dr., 6 cyl., stick,
21,000 miles, body immac., eng. has
weak valve that will need repair.
Own. Moving to NYC. $875. Call Jerry:
764-0328; 663-1919. 17N69
1967 MG-B-GT, excellent car for college
student with sporting urge. Good
condition, low mileage, many extras.
Call Bill after 4 at 761-2802. 18N71
'68 SHELBY 428 c.i. $200 down, take
over payments. Call 665-9973. 14N69
'65 BUICK Skylark, standard, 8 cyl.,
good cond., orig. owner, Call 665-
7551. 15N70
RAMBLER, 1961 station wagon and 2
snow tires. New battery May. $100.
Gave Englishman trouble-free year.
763-2299. .4635 Haven Hall. 16N68
1968 SHELBY Cobra GT-500, red. 13,000
miles, exc. cond., best offer. 434-1942.
9N71
'57 LINCOLN for sale, runs good, must
sell. Make offer 761-4289 after 5 p.m.
10N68
'61 LE SABRE BUICK in good running
shape; slightly damaged body. $250
neg. Call 769-0024. ND70

USED CARS
'65 VALIANT convertible, V-8, auto-
matic, exc. running needs paint
touch up and 2 tires. Book price
$825, best offer. 429-4091. 12N69,
Comaro 1967
2-door hardtop, V-8, automatic trans.,
power steering, just like new inside
and out, must see to appreciate.
T and M Chevrolet, Saline, 7895 E.
Michigan Ave., 429-9481. 11N68
MGB ROADSTER 1967
Green. Good condition. 769-1318. 5N691
V.W., '70, in excellent condition. Call F
761-7492 between 5-8 p.m. 6N68
FOR SALE
GE 200 STTEREO record player. Good.
condition, inexpensive. Call Debbie at
665-4830 or 764-0562. BD7O
HOUSEHOLDtGOODS - Everything we
have now thru Aug. 18th. 323 John
St., 769-3942. 22B69
6,000 BTU WESTINGHOUSE window
air cond., 1 yr. old. $95. 761-0973
after 6. 18868
STEREO RECORD PLAYER for sale.
Inexpensive, good condition. Call
Debbie at 764-0562 or 665-4830. BD70
DAVIS TENNIS RACKET, excellent
shape, $10. Call 761-1463. 19B70
TRADE OR SELL '63 Buick Special
convertible, MG 1100 doesn't run,
Phillips AM-FM radio tape deck, for
bicycle or motorcycle. 662-6454 or
764-9140. 20B70
MOVING SALE, Aug. 14-16 - Clothing,
excellent furniture, sewing machine,
fan, wigs, etc. "663-6478, 214 N. First.
21B68
MUST SELL 1969 HONDA 90, excellent
condition. Call 483-3594. 16B71
HEAD 320 SKIS, Scott poles and Tylolla
bindings. Call 761-2927. B69
1968 CHAMPION Mobile Home, 12 ft. x
60 ft., 2 bdrm., carpeted living room,
17 miles from AA, may remain on
present site, exc. cond., terms avail-
able, located in modern park. 662-
3803. 48B68
MUSICAL MDSE,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
CHARMING OLD PIANO-TUNED
Great shape, will negotiate. 761-2743.
18X71
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and
used. Lessons, repairs. 209 S. State,
665-8001, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. X
GIBSON CLASSIC (unfinished) guitar.
$140/best offer. Call 769-0024. XD70

PERSONAL
WHERE MARGINAL PRICES Buy Qual-
ity Diamonds! Austin Diamonds, 1209
S. University. 663-7151. F
ONE WEEK FROM TODAY IT WILL
OFFICIALLY BE RICHERYL . . . the
blurb. FD68
SUNDAY 3/$1 UNION 3 P.M. AIR-COND.
M PIN BOWLING 3 P.M. MON.-SAT.
27F68
BIO. FREAK seeks adoptable female
companion to share scenery, cooking,
and tent for trip to green mts. and
Maine wilderness. Ph. 663-0760. 28F71
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BLUES FES-
TIVAL-With an estimated loss of
from ten to twenty thousand dollars
the blues festival may die. Send do-
.nations to the Blues Festival, Mich-
igan Union. FD71
Tippecanoe and THE BLURB too! FD66
UNDEDGRAD GIRL would like to meet
med or grad student in some medical
science who is interested in dating
someone willing to listen to hours on
end of shop talk. Write Box 15, c/o
Daily. FD68
SUNDAY SPECIAL 1-6 P.M. UNION
BILLARDS $1/hr. TABLE TENNIS250c
29F68
PLAYBOY type models needed. Highest
earnings if you qualify. State age, etc.
Photo if possible. Reply: Box 15,
Whitmore Lake. 22F71
PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY at
flexible rates. For most things pho-
tographic, call RICHARD LEE, Inc. at
761-9452. FD71
POCKET BILLIARDS EXHIBITION
JIMMY CARAS, UNION BALLROOM
SEPT. 16, 7 and 9 P.M.

PERSONAL
U.M. BARBERSHOP
UNION, MON.-SAT. 8:30 A.M-5:15 P.M.
18F68
BARB
We miss you. FD68
AUTO TUNE-UP AND REPAIR, ludi-
crously reasonable. Student. 662-6746,
40F5S
PAINTING - Student desires painting
jobs, inside and outside. Four years
experience. Call 662-4736. FD
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND--Gold and white Basset, otter
skin collar, also long haired black
and white poodle. 761-3882. S. Univ.
Iand Washtenaw. AD7O.
FOUND - Pair man's grey and black
glasses in4blue case near IM build-
ing. 769-7467 after 5. AD69
LOST-3 mo. old kitten. Female, sort
of calico, predominately dark with
orange stripe running up nose.. Is
under medication. Please contact Kris
or Pat at 508 Elm or leave message
at 769-0988. 44A69
LOST-Woman's prescription sunglasses
at AA Bank on S. Univ. 8/11. 761-2780.
45A69
LOST-Borrowed gold and pearl brace-
let, vic. S. Univ. and Tappan, Wed.
Please call Susan, 761-7060. 46A69I
SUNSHINE IS LOST
REWARD for lost brown labrador. pup-
py, 5-6 wks. old, vicinity E. Univ.
and Hill. Call Zeke Gabbard, 971-1766,
663-9373. A71

r eatiot im affder Goalin-g
603 E. Liberty
DIAL 5-6290
They make their
own laws
at "The Cheyenne
Social Club"
-p
NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES PRESENTS
JAM~ES STEWART
HENRY FONDA
"THE CHEYENNE
SOCIAL CWB
SHIRLEY JONES
SUE ANE LANGDON
WRITTEN sY JAMES LEE BARRETT
nR ooCEDm AnDofmT GENE KELLY
UECUW pEusem JAMES LEE BARRETT
Twis t r "T a ia $CWF TECK#r MaWN"
DOORS OPEN 12:45
Shows At 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

TICKETS SEPT. 1 $1, at door $1,25 FOUND - Champaign colored female
19F68 kitten, adorable,, owner or interested
NOTICE TO MICHIGAN DAILY BOX party call 665-5364 or 764-4080. AD66
HOLDERS. MAIL IS IN THE FOL- FOUND - Keys on Packard. 761-6784.
LOWING BOXES: 55. FD AD66
THE MASQUE OF RED DEATH'
1964. Dir. Roger Corman. COLOR
VINCENT PRICE, HAZEL COURT
Excellent example of the newer horror film
SHORT: A Total Loss (Ben Turpin)
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 c AUDITORIUM

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

GLF ban
reiterated
byWells
It appears now that tody's all-
Michigan Gay Liberation Front
(GLF) conference will not allowed
on University property.
Under the present guidelines for
GLF meetings, President Robben
Fleming bans any gathering spon-
sored by GLF that is not a local
meeting and "educational" in for-
mat.
GLF reserved several rooms in
the Union for the conference July
27. Union General Manager Stan-
field Wells last Friday disclosed he
was temporarily refusing the re-a
servations after he received a let-
ter from Vice President for Stu-
dent Services Barbara Newell re-
iterating Fleming's earlier reasons
for banning a planned Midwest
conference of homosexuals.
Wells then asked to meet with
GLF spokesman, Jim Toy, in order
to discuss the conference and find
out if it were acceptable according
to Fleming's criteria. Toy, how
ever, refused to meet with Wells.
Wells said yesterday, "I am
withholding the rooms, and if I
hear nothing from him (Toy) by
tomorrow then they will be denied
space."
Fleming's original letter banning
the Midwest conference stated the
conference was not "clearly educa-
tional in nature and directed pri-
mariy towards those people who
have a professional interest in the
field."
In a follow up letter in June,
Fleming cited the adverse publicity
as a reason for denying the re-
quest.
Thursday, the executive officers,
including Fleming who had just
returned from a two week trip to
Australia, met and "reaffirmed"
the President's ban on the confer-
ence.
Nixon, Sou
discussimt
NEW ORLEANS (P)- President
Nixon emphasized yesterday his
firm intention to bring about
sweeping desegregation in the
South this fall but declared he
would not be punitive towards the
region.
"This is one country, one peo-
ple and we're going to act, but
not in a punitive way," the chief
executive told a news conference
after meeting several hours with
federally sponsored desegregation
advisory councils from seven
southern states.
Nixon said he received "mag-
nificent cooperation" from the bi-
partisan, biracial councils of
prominent southerners.
He said the administration in-
tends to exercise strong leader-
ship on desegregation "because we
believe in order and justice and
believe in enforcing the law."
The President broke no new pol-
icy ground in his desegregation
comments. But they assumed extra
significance by being delivered
to an audience in the heart of the
Deep South.
Nixon stressed several times
that he's only following the man-
date of the Supreme Court and in-
tends to move in cooperation with
southern leaders and not treat the
region as a "second class citizen."
The President appealed to the
news media to stress what he be-
lieves will be the many peaceful

examples of desegregation in the
South this fall rather than isolated
instances of violence and disrup-
tion.
"It would be extra helpful if we
have cooperation from members
of the press and the member me-
dia," he said. "I know of no time
when it is more important to hear
of the successes where men of
good will have worked their way."
Nixon said resistance to desegre-
gation will hurt most "the next

-Associated Press
{ Meet the press
West German Chancellor Willy Brandt faces the microphones
and questions of newsmen from around the world in Bonn yester-
day after returning from Moscow>He told newsmen about the new
Soviet-West German nonaggression pact signed in Moscow Wed-
nesday. Foreign Minister Walter Scheel, left, accompanied Brandt
on the journey.
ANTIGOVERNMENT MOVE:
Blacks ask pouwr
in South Aricar
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa UP)-Antigovernment pamphlets
were distributed with a bang by small bombs for the second straight
day yesterday- and sent police chasing after the fluttering leaflets.
Another bundle of the propoganda pamphlets signed by the
African National Congress (ANC), an outlawed black power move-
ment, was dumped into a Johannesburg street from a fast moving
truck.
The bombs scattered leaflets in four widely separated cities in
South Africa. Thursday and yesterday. Two of the blasts also started
small tape recorders chattering diabrites against the government.
The leaflets expressed defiance of South Africa's white rulers and
--- ended by saying: "We will take
back our country."
Police warned that possession
of the pamphlet is against the law
under South Africa's Suppression
of Communism Act.
Immediate government reaction
was to play down the incidents.
egratio ulrsi n aeTw hth
Police Minister Stephanus L.
Muller said in Cape Town that he
generation of southerners. They might try to get the supreme court
will pay the price, the price for to block further dissemination of
the failure of leadership," he said. news of the pamphlet's contents.
At several different times during The government-franchised radio
his remarks to newsmen, Nixon network and most afternoon
expressed sympathy and under- papers appeared to heed his warn-
standing of the problems facing ing and handled the story lightly,
the South in converting from dual Security police chief P. J. Venter
to unitary school systems. said the pamphlet-bombs were
He asked members of the local "nothing more than an attempt
advisory committees to exercise by the ANC to get cheap publi-
maximum leadership to quell pos- city." English and Afrikaans lan-
sible disruption and unrest ac- guage newspapers fell for it, he
companying the dismantling of said.

peace.
The solution calls for the return
of 40,000 refugees to Israel from
the one and one half million who
now live in squalid refugee camps
in neighboring Arab states, the
magazine' said.
The other section would pro-
vide for resettlement of remain-
ing refugees in Arab countries un-
der a $1 billion program t h a t
would compensate them for land
and property in Israel before their
exodus.
Half of the money would be
paid by the United States, t h e
magazine said, and the rest would
come from Japan and countries of
western Europe.
Jordan took its complaint of an
Israeli cease-fire violation to the
United Nations, charging that the
Jewish state was deliberately at-
tempting to undermine peace ef-
forts.
In private meetings with U.N.
peace envoy Gunnar V. Jarring
and U.S. ambassador Charles Yost
in New York, Jordanian ambassa-
dor Muhammed El-Farra accused
Israel of resorting to "sensational-
ism a n d fabrications in an at-
tempt to mislead world public
opinion and divert it from the Is-
raeli defiances and acts of law-
lessness."
The Jordanian government call-
ed the Israeli attacks a "flagrant
violation" of the cease-fire agree-
ment. A government statement is-
sued in Amman said it had in-
structed its UN delegates to com-
plain to Jarring, the peace me-
diator. A spokesman said two Is-
raeli fighters attacked civilian
cars in the northern Jordan Val-
ley with rockets and machine
guns.
Jordanian anti - aircraft guns
founght the raiders.
The Middle East peace plan, in-
itiated by the United States and
accepted by Israel, Egypt and Jor-
dan, includes a shooting cease-
fire for at least 90 d a y s. The
cease-fire went into effect 1 as t
Friday at midnight.

Ir

Isra eij
'hit Jordt
arm y P0
TEL AVIV (A - Israeli jets hit
and guerrilla targets yesterday in
the second Israeli cease-fire violat
The Israeli military. command
Jordanian army strongholds that a
and make it possible "for them tc
ians."
In Beirut, the weekly magazir
States had proposed a solution to th
gee problem, long a formid- -
able block to the Middle East I v

v

t
It
Th
indic
char
fede:
Mich
jury
Sk:
and
are c
mon
Pant
dyna
offic
and
Cody
unfu.
PI
revo
FBI'
Taul
a pi
July
tosse
hicle
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W
rest
mon
chec
reste
Pl
held
troit
Ta
the
Whil
ident
capt
Of
rent
for
head
is i
Forr
ucat
PR]
frog
lear
ast
stral
test!
oth e
fort
test<

"A bewilderment of riches...demands to be seen!~
-Newsweek
"One of the more chilling episodes among
fictional treatments of a woman's life and love!"
-New YoekTimes
"W ILDLY FUNNY!"-. Wall Stouna£
"BRILUANT"-p/.yb0oy
"One of the best films of the I ter
"Dazzling...Stunning... Ro er-GntI r
"Devastating and riveting!" :f

"CHALLENGES THE
HOLL YWOOD
SYSTEM! if
Director Avakian is the quintessence of a
newly successful breed of maverick film
maker. Their movies-among them 'Easy
Rider,' 'Putney Swope,' 'Medium Cool,'
'Last Summer'-are all undiluted private

dual school systems.

r.

visions..

They possess a brutal honesty!"
-Life Magazine

DOUBLE FEATURE-ENDS TUESDAY

AN ALLIED ARTISTS FILM
eand ovhe4

X
r

ST Y kEW, HARRIS ill , K T!TRISTAN JAMES AILJRES
B A WILARAM AVAKIAN MAX L RAAB TERRY SOUTHERN. OSTEPHEN F.KESTEN
VENNiS McGUIRE. TERRY SOUTHERN ARAM AVAKIAN "The End of the Road".. JOHN BARTH -IN COLOR
FRI.-"Belle," 7:15, 10:54-"Road," 9:00 only
SAT.-"Belle," 3:55, 7:15, 10:50-
"Road," 2:15, 5:35, 9:00
SUN.-"Belle," 3:55, 7:15-"Road," 2:15, 5:35, 9:00
MON., TUE.-"Belle," 7:15 only-"Road," 9:00 only

WINNER BEST PICTURE
VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
"BRILLIANT! A beautifully
filmed erotic story of re-
pressed desires"
-Cue
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!"
-N.Y. Times
-Cue Maqazine
-Saturday Review
"A 'emarkable, fascinating
film, one of Bunuel's best!"

FIFTH " "ATSEATALLSRY
PT 'RBu"SN SAT ION AL"
lii OWN{T0WN AN R90Bt*
INF0RN AYI0N 761-'9700

-Hcrper's
--Life

Serving dinner until 2 am

.III

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