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August 14, 1970 - Image 5

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Publication:
1970-014, 1970-08-14
Note:
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PogeEi4t

NTCf-Ji Gr d DA I L.Y
f MV

Friday, Agust1i4, 1970 Fday, August 1 1970

* THE MICHI AN DAILY ,.

£it

0

r ++....

i

*Oi

experiential

awsareness

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 761
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

/

Rahe B. Corlis and Peter
Rabe, PSYCHOTHERAPY
F R O M THE CENTER: A
HUMANISTIC VIEW OF
CHANGE AND OF GROWTH,
International Textbook Co.,
$6.00
By JIM McGLOIN
This is not a textbook; but
neither is it written - - as the
authors warn -- for the casual
reader: "It is for the reader who
is psychotherapeutically orient-
ed, who wants to participate in
psychological change arid in
personal growth . . ." If you
are such a reader, and if you can
put aside for a time what you
know about the reinforcement
therapies and about the tradi-
tional psychoanalytic methods,
which emphasize cognition; if
you can give your full attention,.
without resistance, to this de-
scription of a psychotherapeutic
approach that focuses on im-
mediate experiencing, and if you
are able to reach beyond the
verbal expression, applying what
is said to your own immediate
interpersonal experience, you
will again and again be sur-
prised and delighted by the
clarity and precision of the
authors' observation and under-
standing -and you will very
likely find that your own "ex-
periential awareness' is in-
The approach described in
Psychotherapy From the Center
bears soie resemblance to ex-
istential psychiatry and to the

b
0
0
k
S

encounter less as an instance
of proper technique and more
as a creative moment which
meets its own needs. For that
reason we will have to stress
the state of the therapist
more than his professional
bag of tricks or his memory
for proper techniques,
Except for the first chapter,
which presents in 17 pages of
remarkably clear and simple
language the conceptual frame-
work of this therapy, the book
is written almost entirely in the
context of the psychotherapu-
tic process. In Chapters 2 e
7, we are taken step by step in
systematic but lively fashion
through sections dealing criti-
callyuwith the patient's history,
diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic
plans and goals, termination
and outcomes. Along the way, in
Chapters 3 and 4, considerable
attention is given to various
aspects of the growing thera-
peutic encounter and to the use
of techniques. Six specific tech-
niques that "can help make
contact with a closed patient" or
that "can be useful in helping
the patient move ahead" are
described in detail and illustrat-
ed with case material. The book
also contains fresh and helpful
sections on the purpose and use
of homework to carry the pa-
tient's therapeutic efforts into
his natural environment, on the
problem of authority and on the
meaning and purpose of authen-
ticity in the therapist-patient
relationship, on listening and
hearing, on the therapeutic re-
sponse (dealing especially with
confrontation, reflection and
interpretation), on anxiety, on
resistances and how to deal
with them, on physically touch-
ing the patient, etc.
The psychotherapeutic orien-
tation and technique which Dr.
Corlis and Dr. Rabe describe is
grounded in the "ongoing, im-
mediate experience of both pa-
tient and therapist as they in-
teract;". our concern," they
emphasiz e,"is with experi-
ential events and with ways of
knowing them.," The thrapeutic
encounter is not approached
with thep Irearranged focus of
any theory- only after the en-
counter "has been allowed to
occur w ith a minimum of judg-
ment" is theory applied to what
has been given. The authors
state that
It is therapeutically impor-
tant to note that the use of a
category is a form of distor-
tion Particularly at early
moments of the therapeutic
encounter any organizational
attempt is a contamination of
the encounter.
Any subjective experience of
what is known here-and-now is
acceptable datuh, and it is
dealt with in terms of its per-
sonal meanings for the person
with the experience. For exam-
ple, "a religious experience can
be handled on the level on
which it occurs without neces-
sary postulations about the ex-
istence of God." As the authors
note, moreover, "Any topic can
be relevant in the psychothera-
peutic situation. Its relevance,
however, is only discovered by
its effect on the contact be-
tween patient and therapist"
The emphasis is on the what
and how-as well as on the
now - of the therapeutic en-
counter; why is generally shun-
ned as "the unfortunate ques-
tion which instantly propels us
beyond the experiential event
and into speculation." Consider
then, for example, how a resis-
tance would be handled (a re-
sistance is here regarded, more
or less, as whatever the patient
does to maintain the status quo
and to prevent himself from ex-
periencing with immediacy the
therapeutic encounter as it
occurs):
The patient talks and then
suddenly he falters and stops.

Don't ask why he has stopped,
a question which likely as not
evokes a variety of spurious
rationalizations and guesses.
Instead: "What stops you?"
"It's like I've come up against
a wall."

The question has concen-
trated the patient's attention
on the experienced event. The
responsive a n s w e r reflects
what the patient actually
feels. He feels stopped by a
wall which is his experience
of the resistance. Now stay
with the resistance by staying
with the patient's experience
of the wall.
"What kind of a wall?"
The authors state that "Behind
every resistance-lies unfinished
business which the resistance
encapsules and keeps from the
patient's view." In the example
above, the therapist involves the
patient in an active exploration
of his resistance in an effort to
dissolve it by discovering and
coming to grips with the un-
finished business and achieving
closure.
A principal therapeutic aim
of the contactful patient-thera-
pist interchange is

ing; it is simply a matter of
practical necessity. In our
cultural context the neurotic
is invariably the 'individual
who pays for his particular
form of balance with a top-
heavy emphasis on intellec-
tual agility and a reduced per-
missiveness for the motion of
feelings. As their brains bulge,
their guts shrivel. The less
they feel, the less burdened is
their fanciful dance with the
meaningless~ The delights of
such freedom have their lim-
its. If all this worked well,
there would be nobody in the
therapist's office.
From the practical point of
view the first sine qua non of
psychotherapy is to help the
patient feel again. Paradoxi-
cally, this includes the patient
who complains of feeling too
much. , . . his case is not a
question of feeling too much
but of overracting. His com-

tive, and effectful upon the
world around us.
We do not say that center
is good and that periphery is
bad. We say that to get stuck
in either is arrhythmic and
therefore not healthy. When
we are well we know our
rhythm and move with it.
Then we are the rhythm, we
are center and periphery and
the motion from one to the
other is like the living breath,
The a u t h o r s note, moreover,
that
Our cultural emphasis on the
periphery is well-nigh exclu-
sive, heavy-handed, and often
severe. We are doers. . . . It
is a topic of this book to detail
the emptying, the exhausting
fate of exclusive peripheral
living.
In a superb discussion of three
modes of therapeutic response,
Dr. Corlis and Dr. Rabe describe
interpretation and reflection,
with emphasis on "their limited
usefulness . . . in regard to the
one imperative requirement of
the therapeutic encounter: ex-
panding experiental awareness."
p. 33) They then describe "con-
frontation" as their offer toward
this major requirement.
Confrontation is an ap-
proach and a fluid achieve-
ment of the very state which
it tries to reach awareness
through the act of confronting
each other . .. confrontation
is achieved when the therapist
reacts from his center. It it
fulfilled when the patient re-
acts from his center too. The
view from the center sees a
world which is unaltered by
wish, by dream, by projection.
Rephrased in the positive, the
view from the center sees the
world of here-and-now.
. . In confrontation the
act is between I and Thou.
Buber said this for us: "All
real living is meeting."
In that sense confrontation
becomes a microcosm of life,
and to the extent that this
'onfrontive living is achieved,
to that extent has the patient
transcended the special 'ir-
enmstances of the therapeutic
hour. (p. 31)
Throughout the book the rare
beauty and vitality of the lan-
guage make it a joy to read, and
quite unlike the impersonal
quality of much writing today
- here the voice of the authors
can be heard on each page --
clear, direct, unconventional and
alive; it is plain to the reader
that these men have lived in-
timately with their psycho-
therapetutic experience and that
they are here telling us in a per-
sonal and immediate way what
they have learned and how they
learned it. I found myself read-
ing the book with a sense of en-
thusiasm and discovery, and
(this is rare for me) I had read
it twice and taken copious notes
before I was willing to put it
aside. Furthermore, what I have
learned from Psychotherapy
From The Center has continual-
ly helped me to be more imme-
diately present and in touch
in my daily encounters with
others. As the authors state,
"this entire book deals with
ways of moving from impersonal
talk to personal touch and en-
counter."
Today's Writers.
Jim McGloin is a graduate
student in the Department of
Social Work. An Assistant Pro-
fessor of English at the Univer-
sity, John Rodenbeck teaches
courses in American literature,
Neal Bruss, who worked for
Time, Inc. this summer, is a
doctoral student in English at
the University.
The'illustration on this page
is a Rasamandala depicting the

dance of the Indian god Krish-
na with his worshippers. An
outstanding exhibit of Indian
miniature paintings concerned
with Krishna is presently being
shown at the University Art
Museum.

L INES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1 55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2 40
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 '0.70

2 davs
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9 50
13 50
17.35
21.10

3 dovs
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5 50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55-
31.40

4 dos
3.00
4.05
4.05
4 65
6.35
7.20
7.90
8.70
9.30
9.30
17.85
25.50
33 45
41.40

5 dovs
3.65
4.85
5.90
6.90
7.85
8.85
9 75
10.65
11.35
11.35
21.75
31.15
40.95
51.15

6 days
4.20
5.65
6.90
8.05
9.25
10.40
11.45
12.60
13.60
13.30
25.40
36 65
48.30
60.50

add.
.60
.80
.95
1.15
1.30
1.45
1 55
1.70
1.80
1.80
1.80
1 80
1 80
1.30

Additional costs per drayotter sixd
Ads that are 1A, 2W. 31, et
average of the lower and highe
FOR RENTC
ROOMMATE NEEDED, $90 mo. 2 bdrm.C
furnished. 663-0760. 25C71

ROOMS FOR FALL
GIRLS-Commute from Ypsi and save.
Double rooms, kitchens, TV room.
date room, Co-op living, near bus to
AA. $55/mo. 482-0407. 23C71
1 AND 2 BDRM. furn., ideal for 2-3
women, A/C, parking, near State and
Packard. 769-7455 or 761-2423. 18C71
HOSPITAL AREA - Two bedroom. 4-
man, furnished, parking, individual
storage lockers, laundry facilities.
$215 per month includes heat and
water. Campus Management, Inc., 662-
7787. 17Cte
OBSERVATORY
CAMPUS NEAR HOSPITALS
Air-conditioned
Two-bedroom furnished
Wall-to-wall carpeting
Covered parking
$240.00 for 3 . . . $260.00 for 4
Includes heat and water.
Campus Management, Inc.
Open 'til 9 p.m.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
19Ct<
FURN.. MOD. 2 BDRMS.
911 S. FOREST
near Hill St.
4-man. $65 ea. CALL 668-6906
46Cic
APARTMENTS CLOSE TO CAMPUS
Ingalls at rn
Modern 2 Udrn. units furnis $0
$260 mo,; unfurnished: $200 ro.
Oakland-Hill Area
Modern, 2 b$rm.: 230 mo. IL=r e I
drinM suile f>r 2-3 t rs un-
furnid $15 "n. f"r"h'hed: $205
mnc Call Mide Mzinaziement., 63-
S to 5. 20C;
TV RENTALS Students only, $10.4 0
mo. Incl.udes promptw delivery servi e,
and pick-up Call Nejac, 662-567L
Ctc

i

days.
c, inch size will be billed at the
r inch rate.
FOR RENT
GARAGES-May be locked, lease. 7231
Packard near State. 15C71
TENTS-TENTS--TENTS1
We need many tents for the first week
in Sept. Have a Tent? Want some ex-
citement? Call us 10-5 763-3102. This
is as important as your apt. itself,
CD71I
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Several beautifully decorated, fur-
nished, 2-bedroom, bi-level apts
still available for fall semester.

UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES

FOR RENT
APARTMENT LOCATOR-$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrm. fall apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764, 40Cte
LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are look-7
ing for? Tell them cheaply, yet effec-
tively in Daily classifieds, 764-0557,
11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. CD68
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS;
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart--
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $2601
mo. Featuring:
Dishwasher _
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36C71
ANNOUNCINGK
Eastern Highlands
Exciting living in largest campus
luxury apartments.
* Fully furnished 9 two bedrooms.
0 one and two bedrooms * one and
half bathrooms a swimming pool *<
air conditioning 0 on EMU campus
(just 6 miles from Ann Arbor),
While they last these luxurious four-
man units are renting for only $245
mo.
Call 483-7220 or 668-7517
HALL MANAGEMENT COMPANY
16C71
SANS SOUCI APTS.
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
31 Ct.
CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAH LMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST

i I

'64 DODGE 440, 52,000 miles. $350 or
best offer. 662-0167. 12N71

Comoro

1967

Dishwashers * Vacuum cleaners
112 Baths * Air-Cond. * Balconies
Parking 0 Laundry and Storage
facilities * Excellent sound con-I
ditioning.
Call the Resident Manager at
761-1717 or 665-8825 or stop in
at the lobby office 12 noon to 6 p.m.
daily, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
761-1717
11Ctc
NEED AN APARTMENT
AND/OR ROOMMATES?
MEET YOUR
MATCHMAKERS
Chris & Nancy .
who will help you select your
modern, bi-level apt.
Several furnished 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments still available at con-
veni ni-,t campus locations.
DO-hwasherln s, vacuumi cleaners, hal-
conies, 1%. baths, air cond., park-
ing, laundry & storage facilities.
24 hour maintenance( srvice
CHARTER REALTY
665-8825
1335 S. University
9Ctc

USED CARS

I

2-door hardtop, V-8, automatic trans.
power steering, just like new inside
and out, must see to appreciate.
T and M Chevrolet, Saline, 7895 E.
Michigan Ave., 429-9481. 14N68
CAMARO, '68, auto., p.s., console. vinyl
top, asking $1800. 769-3212. 8N67
MGB ROADSTER 1967
Green. Good condition. 769-1318. 5N69
V.W., '70 in excellent condition. Ca1
761-7492 between 5-8 p.m. 6N68
FORD. 1963 Galaxie hardtopeair, 390
cu. in., original owner, very little
rust, good runner, best offer takes.
Call 434-0392 after 5 or weekend.
52N67
1965 OPEL, tan, 28 mpg, 47.000 miles.
exe. transportation, Ie)t offer over
$425. 663-1401. 47N67
PERSONAL
SUNDAY 3 $1 UNION 3 P.M. AIR-COND.
M PIN BOWLING 3 P.M. MON.-SAT.
27F68
BIO. FREAK seeks adoptable female
companion to share scenery, cooking.
anid tenit for trip to grreen mts. and
Miiie wilenes-,Ph;. (61-0760. 28F71
BB ROCKAWAY fnaly leaving
Am Arbor
To all his friends he wishes self-
fulfillment and peace Ita been a
privilege knowing you 2F9
SUPPORT IYOUR LOCAL LUES FES-
TI VAL-With an et imated l o::sof
''In nien to tweiity tosaddol lar>[
theirblues festival may di.Snd do-
nations to the Blues ei icl-
an Union. FDaI
ITippewan~oe and 'I UE BLURB too! F 1)6(i
UNDIIEDOR+?AI) tGI1L, would 1lke t ire
""wh is ineese inda in
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en]o) so;Ilk rie ot1.

F

P(
JT
PAIN
exj

RAMBLER. 1961 station wagon and 2 SIN
snow tires. New battery May. $100.!fr
Gave Englishman trouble-free year. m
763-2299. 4635 Haven Hall. 16N68 q1
1968 SHELBY Cobra GT-500, red. 13,000 66
miles, exc. cond., best offer. 434-1942
9N71 PR(
- - - -fl
'57 LINCOLN for sale, runs good. must tC
sell. Make offer. 761-4289 after 5 p.m. 76
10N68
'61 LE SABRE BUICK in good running
shape; slightly damaged body. $250 -
neg. Call 769-0024. ND7O0ECG
-- - -fr
'65 VALIANT convertible, V-8, auto-
matic, exc. running, needs paint
touch up and 2 tires. Book price NO0
$825. best offer. 429-4091. 1N69 H
LC

FOU
of
or
it
or
at
I O

Gestalt Therapy of F. S. Perls.
Dr. Corlis and Dr. Rabe, how-
ever, seldom refer to the histori-
cal antecedents of their thera-
peutic orientation, except for an
occasional reference to Husserl,
Buber, or Carl Rogers. They ex-
plain themselves as follows:
Our infrequent use of cross-
matching the views or conclu-
sions of others has been done
with intent. We want'to in-
troduce the existential ap-
proach of our method-exis-
tentially. In the concrete, that
means that we want to pre-
sent the psychotherapeutic
encounter as it occurs and as
it is experienced. This purpose
is not served by meeting a
novel event in the context of
what is already known. In-
stead, we will describe an ap-
proach into the novel situa-
tion of each encounter with-
out t h e contamination of
viewing the event in terms of
its sameness to something
else. The manner in w h i c h
this book is written has this
immediacy of experience as its
aim. How to confront the
uniqueness of the psycho-
therapeutic event is the topic
of this book. We regard the
e v e n t of psychotherapeutic

To put the patient in touch
with areas in himself whose
existence he must learn to
know and accept if he wants
psychological harmony. We
are trying to increase the
range of his behavioral choice
. . . to restore his own self-
command in place of a mal-
function that has started to
operate independently.
The focus of attention in this
effort includes not only the
content of what the p a t i e n t
says but his style as well-his
"body language."
The goals of this therapy tend
to be rather more general than
the ones the patient has con-
templated; for example, in ad-
dition to greater range of
choice:, increased experiential
awareness, a more fully avail-
able, integrated personality, and
a willingness to risk facing the
newness of life as it comes;"
also, "to help dissolve the con-
ditioned fixity of the patient's
character so that the] . . . can
find the 'satisfactions available
in the present;" to help the pa-
tient to again avail himself of
his own strength; and to revive
"desensitized areas" in order to
help the patient feel again.
The following paragraphs will
suggest the important place that
feelings have in this approach
to psychotherapy:
We regard the intellectual
capacity as a scanning device.
It scans what we fee. If we
feel nothing, then there is
nothing to scan, and any in-
tellectual application is use-
less ...
From the point of view of
the therapist, the working em-
phasis on feeling something
through is not a paean to
extol emotion over intellect,
or feeling o v e r understand-_

plaint is real but his diagnosis
is false. . . he does not feel
differentially. All is one murk,
whether there is too much
feeling or too little. . . the
emotional; experience of pos-
sessing a feeling must again
become permissible. The as-
sault of an emotion (a threat
for the anesthetized patient,
a defeat for the one who
"feels too much") must again
become an expression of his
own strength which comes
out of him instead of remain-
ing a disowned strength which
then assaults him.
The revival of impulse expres-
sion in this therapy
. . . goes through careful
stages: (1) to let oneself have
the feeling; (2) to be able to
express it; (3) not being
compelled to express it; (4)
and to let go of it.
The book describes in detail
how these steps can be taken.
The "center" referred to in
the title of the book is one of
two organismic states desig-
nated by the authors as "the
state of operating at the peri-
phery and the state of being at
center." These concepts and the
experience to which they refer
are made quite clear in defini-
tion and in use throughout the
book, but perhaps the following
paragraphs will distinguish
them most concisely:
[Being at center] . . . is the
state of experiencing directly
and without purpose. It is the
most open, receptive state of
being which we know. At cen-
ter there is that kind of quiet
existence which k n o w s calm
and soft peace,
And then . . . we move to
the periphery o n c e again
where our focus and our acts
become purposeful, manipula-

STATE STREET MANOR
111 S. State Street
2, 3, or 4 man large apta
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
761-3567
1-864-3852

DELUXE FURNISHED 4-man. 2 bdrm.,
close to campus, parking. 8 and 12
mo. lease. McDoinald, after 5, 662-
6156. 24071

761-7600

38ctc

Ctc

BARGAIN CORNER
BARGAIN GOODBYES - Tables, desk
lamp, port. stereo, dishware, clothes,
LP records, books. CHEAP. 769-0797.
9W7C
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims.......6.50
Button-Fly........6,50
Traditional.......6.98
Bells ............7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SH IRTS ......... .2.49
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"White" Levi's .. 5.50
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Levi's ..........6.98
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Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
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122 E. Washington

TWO BEDROOM, furnished unit, near
law and business schools. Please call
Professional Management Assoc., 769-
4227. 4Ctc
FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undercover parking. 1-864-3852.
50Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. A15Ctc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or, 4. Campus area,
ample closets, storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest, Ctc
HARITON
HOUSE
APARTMENTS
721-723 E. Kingsley
Fall rentals
2 bedroom
Hospital-campus location
Sound conditioned-
Recreation roam
Washing and drying facilities
Air conditioned
Off street parking
Large desk and shelves
Carpet and vinyl floors
Many other goodies
$248/month
663-9373, 663-1002,
evenings, 685-0063
Roommates needed 2C71
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Wall St.--Furnished, new, modern
1 and 2 bedrooms available. 1-864-
3852. liCtc
CHOICE APT$.
For Fall 2, 3, and 4 man, close to
campus, 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30Ctc

3 j
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FOR SALE
HOUSEHOLD GOODS Everything we
have now thru Aug. 18th. 323 John
St., 769-3942. 22B69
6,000 BTU WESTINGHOUSE window
air cond., 1 yr. old. $95. 761-0973
after 6. 18B68
STEREO RECORD PLAYER for sale.
Inexpensive, good condition. Call
Debbie at 764-0562 or 665-4830. BD7O
DAVIS TENNIS RACKET, excellent
shape, $10. Call 761-1463. 19B70
TRADE OR SELL '63 Buick Special
convertible, MG 1100 doesn't run,
Phillips AM-FM radio tape deck, for
bicycle or motorcycle. 662-6454 or
764-9140. 20370
MOVING SALE, Aug. 14-16 - Clothing,
excellent furniture, sewing machine,
fan, wigs, etc. 663-6478, 214 N. First.
21B68

SUNDAY SPECIAL 1-6 P.M UNION
m11I LARDS 1i hr. TABLE 'IENNIS 5c R60e
NED CYCIE H IEIMET for weekenid 66;
YRnt y our's out and arn sme ga
nmoney, Call 764-3059. 26F67 POt
kit
PLAYBOY type models needed. Highes pa
earnings if you qualify. State age etc. -
Photo if possible 1 Reply: Box 15. IFOl
Whitmore Lake. 22F71
"OBSCENE, LEWC
LASCIVIOUS, FIL
OR DISGUSTING.
These are the words which Chief Asi
Kast used to describe our books and
suit against us.
ISEE, FOB CY
AT THE
FOURTH AVENUE A
217 S. Fourt
Open daily and Saturday 10 A.M-
11 P.M. (Look for our huge red-ar
ed sign . , . don't be attracted to
We ore Ann Arbor's largest eroti
unspeakably complete line of pope
newspapers, records, cards, still ph
8mm color and black-and-white r
selection of "novelties." Not to men
viewing machines in the back.
Note: the long-haired freak who me
bookstore has recently installed a
eagerly assault your ears with all
cadent music,
Peace ,. .

MONTH OLD double size BED and 24"
T.V. Must sell immediately. Best
offer. Call 663-7846. 14867
COMPLETE SET of Colliers encyclo-
pedias and yearbooks, $65. 665-6045.
- 15367
MUST SELL 1969 HONDA 90, excellent
condition. Call 483-3594. 161371
HEAD 320 SKIS, Scott poles and Tylolia
bindings. Call 761-2927. B69
1968 CHAMPION Mobile Home, 12 ft. x
60 ft.. 2 bdrm., carpeted living room.
17 miles fromxAA, may remain on
present site, exc. cond.. terms avail-
able, located in modern park. 662-
3803. 48368

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--

USED CARS
'68 SHELBY 428 c.l. $200 down, take
over payments. Call 665-9973. 14N69

I

'65 BUICK Skylark, standard, 8 cyl.,
good cond., orig. owner. Call 665-
7551. 15N70

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