100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 13, 1970 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-08-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

g

gI

.

6

0

0 * Ij 6 F* .'s

0

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, August 13, 1970

RESER

E

CLUS

UPHEL

SfIiC a Cl

IaiI

Vol. LXXX, No. 66-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Thursday, August 13, 1970 Ten Cents
DORM APPLICATIONS REJECTED

.i

The

Court

BASEBALL'S ANTI-TRUST EXEMPTION
REAFFIRMED; APPEAL IS EXPECTED

A. LEE KIRK.

H ousing

tight for

'

4'

I

Support jock lib .. .
.., free Ralph Simpson
FOR RALPH SIMPSON, basketball is a way of life, or rather
it was. The Denver Rockets of the American Basket-
ball Association signed the MSU soph as a hardship case this
past spring, but the ensuing holy howl from colleges and the
NCAA forced ABA commissioner Jack Dolph to rule that Simpson
could not play until his college class graduated in 1972; and
another athlete was victimized.
Under NCAA rules, a player who signs any professional
contract automatically forfeits his right to further collegiate
competition. Thus, the mere act of signing the contract has
almost certainly ended Simpson's playing days at Michigan
State.
Continued enforcement of Dolph's decision and NCAA rules
would serve to keep Simpson sidelined until the 1972-73 season
opens. He would gain nothing by attacking the NCAA regulations,
so Simpson has filed a multi-million dollar suit against Den-
ver, the ABA and Dolph. Money doesn't appear to be the object
of the suit, as Denver has said they will honor his $1 million con-
tract. Simpson apparently hopes to pressure the ABA into re-
versing its decision and allowing him to play.
Knocking the system is something most athletes won't
do as it serves their purpose fairly well, but the system has
not served Ralph Simpson at all.
Youthful athletes aspiring to careers in the professional
ranks must pass through well-defined stages in order to'reach
their goal. First, there is high school competition, perhaps a year
or two in a junior college pumping up the old grades, and then
on to big time college competition. An athlete who fails at any
of these stages has all but doomed his chances for a professional
career.
Only on rare occasions will this system fail to serve
those it is designed to serve best, college and professional
teams. The young football or basketball player coming out
of high school is usually far from ready for professional
competition. Collegiate competition gives him a chance to
improve his skills, and the cost is often covered by a fat
athletic scholarship.
Until recently, the system has functioned well. Pro baseball
continues to sign collegiate stars before they graduate, but a
baseball player matures earlier than a gridder or hardcourt star.
Pro football and basketball have shied away from premature
signings in exchange for cooperation from universities and the
NCAA.
But when Denver signed Spencer Haywood, an Olympic
star and teammate of Simpson's on Detroit Pershing's fan-
tastic state championship team of 1967, relations beween the
ABA and the NCAA became strained. Haywood had com-
pleted only one season at the University of Detroit, but the
Rockets signed him as a hardship case so he could provide
for his large family.
Simpson may also qualify as a hardship case, but his sign-
ing within a year of Haywood's brought such pressure on Dolph
that he felt cohpelled to ban Simpson from the league, regard-
less, until Simpson's class graduated. Dolph's action was but an
attempt to appease the NCAA, which had threatened to bar all
ABA scouts from campuses, and since the NCAA never said it
would allow Simpson to play again, it is hard to understand why
Dolph felt compelled to bow down to them.
Simpson's welfare was of concern to no one. He is one
of those rare athletes whose talents blossomed too quickly
for his own good. Simpson is ready now to play pro ball and
make good money doing it, but he will have a hard time
simply because he didn't complete four years of college, the
completion of four years being more important than actual
graduation.
Hopefully, the ABA will see the error of its way and allow
Simpson to play this season if indeed he is a legitimate hardship
case. This is the only criterion on which they should be able to
pass judgment, and by denying Simpson the right to play after
he has signed a contract would seem to create a hardship case in
itself, although the motivation for the ABA's final resolution of
the case will probably be far less platonic than pragmatic.
In all the furor surounding Simpson's signing, the role'
of the NCAA has been overlooked, but they are the real vil-
lains. Under the guise of amateurism, the NCAA all but en-
slaves an athlete to the college of his choice for at least four
years, and there is very little the athlete can do about it.
Admittedly, the system is not bad for most athletes, but this
is scarcely enough to justify its existence, especially when it
works completely counter to the best interests of someone
like Ralph Simpson. No amateur organization would claim
exclusive rights to an athlete for four years, but for all in-
tents and purposes, the NCAA does make this claim.
The ABA could do everyone a favor by telling the NCAA
where to get off and letting Simpson play this season. It would
be quite a surprise if they did this, but until someone stands up
to the NCAA and their blatant professional amateurism, there
will-be more Ralph Simpson's."

NEW YORK T - Curt
Flood lost his suit against
baseball yesterday when a
federal judge upheld the le-
gality of the sport's contro-
versial reserve system and
suggested any c h a n g e
should be made through
player-owner negotiations.
In handing down his de-
cision two months after the
trial in open court ended,
Judge Irving Ben Cooper
denied Flood's bid for an in-
junction a n d for damages
in the $4.1 million anti-trust
suit that was brought after
he was traded by t h e St.
Louis Cardinals to the Phil-
adelphia Phillies.
"There will, of course, be an
appeal," said Allan Zerman, one
of Flood's attorneys.
Flood has alleged in his com-
plaint that the reserve system,
actually a set of rules, including
a contract clause, that binds a
player to the club that signs
him until he is traded, sold of
released, violated federal anti--
trust statutes.
"Clearly the preponderance of
credible proof does not favor
elimination of the r e s e r v e
clause," Cooper wrote in a 47-
page decision. Instead, the judge
said, the evidence suggested that
"arbitration o r negotiation"
might modify the system to
satisfy all parties."
Judge C o o p e r wrote that
"from the standpoint of the ...
player" the effect of the system
is to "deny him througout his

Would you

buy a

. 0 .

Judge I. B. Cooper
career freedom to chose his
employer" but he noted base-
ball's contention that the sys-
tem is "reasonable and necessary
to preserve the integrity of the
game, maintain balanced com-
petition and fan interest and
encourage continued investment
in player development.
"We are convinced the parties
conflicts between the parties
are not irreconcilable and that
negotiations could produce an
accommodation. . . which would
be eminently fair and equitable
to all concerned."
As for Flood's contention that
the reserve system violated an-
ti-trust laws, Judge Cooper
wrote: ". . . baseball remains
exempt from the antitrust laws
unless and until the Supreme
Court or Congress holds to the
contrary."

Curt Flood

Marvin Miller, executive di-
rector of the Players Asocia-
tion, which supported Flood's
suit, said "all that Judge Coo-
per held is that it is up to the
Supreme Court to overrule the
Supreme Court. I think everyone
knew it would be difficult for a
district court to overrule the Su-
preme Court.
"I think there were significant
points in the decision," Miller
continued. "Judge Cooper ex-
pressly refused to decide on the
reasonableness of the reserve
rule system. He clearly recog-
nized the need for change in the
reserve rule system. And he also
stated his strong conviction that
the matter can be negotiated.
"This of course, has been our
precise position for more than
three years, but the owners have
taken a contrary position."

No, the President isn't trying to
sell something. He merely is
exhibiting the new symbol of
the Post Office Department, a
streamlined bald eagle. Nixon,
who yesterday signed the postal
reform bill, is with Postmaster-
General WV i n t o n Blount who
holds the old plaque. -
-Associated Press
ties

APPROVES NEW ABM SITES

Senate

votes

three

GIBSON SETS RECORD
Mets win; Pirate pitching fails

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI - Wayne Gar-
rett cracked two doubles and
scored twice while Gary Gentry
stymied Cincinnati on four hits
last night as the New York Mets
edged the Reds 2-1.
The Mets took a 1-0 lead in
the third inning as Garrett rip-
ped a two-out double to right,
moved to third on Mike Jor-
gensen's infield hit and scored
when pitcher Tony Cloninger,
5-4, misplayed the ball.
* * *
Bums bump Rucs
PITTSBURGH - Wes Parker
raced home with the tie break-
ing run on an eighth inning
wild pitch by Dave Giusti, start-
ing the Los Angeles Dodgers to

an 11-4 rout of the Pittsburgh
Pirates last night.
eThe Dodgers exploded for sev-
en runs in the ninth -off Giusti
and two other relievers, with a
key two-run single by Jeff Tor-
borg and a two-run double by
Willie Crawford highlighting
the inning.
Magnificent ! !
ST. LOUIS - Carl Taylor
drew a bases-loaded walk in the
bottom of the 14th inning last
night to lift Bob Gibson and the
Cardinals to a 5-4 victory over
San Diego.
Gibson pitched one helluva
game, fanning 13 Padres to be-
come the firsttplayer in major
league history to whiff over 200

;+{;;}}+tti}: si:"::;:.":1'.'':M-ycp v+s.41:+: : :: 1'V +".'+: '.".S.p., ' i ..9:t1 '+ ?:;":v?,::ti4: 'r }'"'}:. ,o {:,.{,,} : :>:%'J" : ,'fil q7:, Y ::$$: Yd;.:.:'+tij::v:r:.:,, {:s.;y:.;.}v:,% {{{:"!.
..1' ....,. 'ifY':+« :+. i4''+tJi: slli/: M: "A'4. X11.".:'.M.A.1.h'1...: ....}:+..V+M.Y.' 4'+.{ .i4+.'.Sti:l :SM.:.\S:'ihV:.}}:v:-. ?. +.L: Y.t1i +.:1:'ik'

Major League Standings

batters in eight different -sea-
sons. He retired the last ten men
he faced.
Tigers tumble
MILWAUKEE - Pinch-hitter
Bernie Smith cracked a two-run,
bases-loaded double to cap a
four-run eighth inning that lift-
ed the Milwaukee Brewers to a
6-5 victory over the Detroit
Tigers last night.
Lombhardi is
seriously ill
CHICAGO (P) - Jerry Kra-
mer in a taped NBC television
interview released on the net-
work yesteday, described h i s
former Green Bay Packer coach,
Vince Lombardi, as "fighting
for his life" in a Washington
hospital.
Lombardi, who left Green Bay
to become head. man of the
Washington Redskins, under-
went surgery earlier this year
and re-entered the hospital
July 27.
Kramer, a guard at Green
Bay under Lombardi, was in-
terviewed in Tulsa and the tape
was run on Johnny Morris' tele-
vision sports show on NBC's
Chicago station WMAQ.
"Lombardi was so weak he
could hardly talk," Morris quot-
ed Kramer as saying. "He has
lost a lot of weight and looks
very drawn. Lombardi told me:
"I'm fighting to lick it.-

to expand
WASHINGTON (A)-The Senate voted a last-dit
52 to 47 yesterday to let President Nixon geographi
expand the Safeguard antiballistic missile At the
system. A little earlier it overwhelmingly Ronald L
rejected a move to reduce the ABM pro- welcomes
gram to a research-only basis. today byt
Then it postponed action on still an- Making
otheramendment to curb administration result thi
development of the multibillion-dollar son (D-N
system intended to protect the missiles Both men
which would be used in retaliation if the changedt
Soviet Union launched a nuclear first-
strike. Anders
The five-vote margin of victory for
the administration was surprisingly large f
in view of that fact that a year ago it : :'
won by only a single vote when it sought'
the initial authorization for deployment
of Safeguard._
The amendment offered by Sens. John
Sherman Cooper (R-Ky.) and Philip
Hart (D-Mich.) would have barred the
expansion of the program to two more-
sites but would have allowed continua-
tion of work on the two sites approved
last year in Montana and North Dakota.
The administration plans' now to go
ahead with two more sites at Warren Air
Force Base in Wyoming and Whiteman
AFB in Missouri.
In pressing for - the expansion, Nixon
argued that the four sites represent the
minimum requirement to counter a pos-
sible Soviet first-strike. And the admin-
istration insisted also that the ABM de-
ployment is essential as a bargaining tool
for the United States in the current Stra-
tegic Arms Limitation Talks with the
Soviet Union.
Sen. Edward Brooke (R-Mass.) failed <b
to win an agreement for a vote on his
amendment to divert all funds to speed
development of the first two ABM sites.
And it was not clear whether Safeguard Soldiers
opponents would attempt to revive it in kidnape

ch stand to halt the program's
c expansion.
White House, press secretary
. Ziegler said, "The President
the constructive action taken
the Senate."
most of the difference in the
s time were Sens. Clinton Ander-
.M.) and Marlow Cook (R-Ky.).
had announced they would vote
their minds.
on voted with ABM supporters

arms capacity

B
Due prin
-crease in
version of
dorm, the
currently h:
sufficient nr
In a me
by Housing
stated that
be accomm
About 80 f
by certifie
to freshma
class male
notified th
dated in res
Associate
Hughes esti
not be able
housing in
pect, howe
who apply.'
Accordin
John Finn,
Governors
West Quad
ratio used
housing sp
The prob
when the a
housing ofi
being adm
proposed fi
Feldkaml
have been
had it not
cepting 30
they had o:
Shortly a
was made k
ed sending
upperclass
already pai
them that
for them i
students ei
the commu
being accep
In the mr
ing to get
fraternities
Extra spa
the convert
omy doubl
these room
basis for t
Unlike la
than Interr
ed in the M
in dorm d
This cau
year and li
cision to 1
for all fres
many hous
room for.
The only
this year i
will start c
for a limite
study room
- Quad.
Universit
Language I
but the ot
parently h
in the comr
Feldkamr
nounced pr
and staff w
dations. sta
.."For ma
those who h
.file for nea
the Univers
Campus an
Central Car
notifying fa
we are sen
some 300 a7
that we wi
fall."

last year. This year he said he had doubts
and would reverse course. He didn't.
Cook voted against ABM last year and
an aide said two hours before the vote he
would do so again this year. He didn't.
Besides Cook, other senators who
switched from last year to vote on the
side of ABM supporters were Howard
Cannon (D-Nev.), Thomas McIntyre (D-
N.H.) and James Pearson (R-Kan.).
Sen. John Pastore (D-R.I.) who voted
for ABM deployment a year ago voted
fore the Cooper-Hart proposal.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

xlaltimore
New York
Detroit
Boston
xCleveland
washington

East
w ]
72
62
61 ;
58
56
53
West

L
42
52
54
55
59
62

Pct.
.632
.544
.530
.513
.487
.461

GB
10_
IY
13%
19Y2~
6
281,/2
28%
29

Pittsburgh
New York
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Atlanta
Houston
San Diego

645
61
595
556
53
49
'Vest
78
65
56
565
52
45

L
53
53
57
60
61
68
40
49
58
59
64
70

Pct.
.547
.536
.509
.474
.464
.417
.663
.571
.491
.487
.448
.391

GB
I%
4Y2
8
9'2
15
11
20
20y
25
32

Minnesota 69 43 .622
xOakland 65 50 .565
xCallfornia 64 50 .561
Kansas City 42 72 .368
Milwaukee 43 74 .367
Chicago 43 75 .364
Yesterday's Results
Milwaukee 6, Detroit 5
Chicago 5, New York 1
Boston 7, Kansas City 4, 1st
Kansas City 4, Boston 3, 2nd
Washington 5, Minnesota 3
Baltimore at California, inc.
Cleveland at Oakland, inc.
Today's Games
Cleveland at Oakland
Baltimore at California
Detroit at Milwaukee
Minnesota at Washington
Chicago at New York, day
Kansas City at Boston, day

Yesterday's Results
Atlanta 8,-Montreal 7
New York 2, Cincinnati 1
Houston 4, Philadelphia 0
Los Angeles 11, Pittsburgh 4
St. Louis 5, San Diego 4, 14 inn.
San Francisco 6, Chicago 3
Today's Games
San Francisco at Chicago, day
San Diego at St. Louis, day
Montreal at Atlanta
New York at Cincinnati
Philadelphia at Houston"
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh

-Associated Pre. s
Searching for the kidnapers
s in Montevideo, Uruguay raid a Communist club in the hunt for the
ers of slain U.S. advisor Dan Mitrione and two others. See story on page 3.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan