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August 12, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-12

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~I~e £fr419an DBuh
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

Wednesday, August 12, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cinema
Boys': Behind the times

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 12, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

Another President
loses his credibility
THE SPECTRE of the credibility' gap is upon us again.
The recent revelation by a Cambodian army officer,
and confirmation by several American news oorrespon-
dents, that United States phantom jets h a d attacked
Communist forces in Cambodia with napalm and bombs
in support for the Cambodian army casts serious doubts
as to whether or not the Nixon administration has been
telling the American people the truth about its current
actions in Indochina.
When Richard Nixon was running for the Presidency,
one of his major campaign weapons was charging the
Johnson-Humphrey administration with deceiving t h e
American people on the war, as well as on other issues of
the day. After succeeding Mr. Johnson, Nixon diligently
attempted to avoid the same mistake.
NOT SURPRISINGLY, he has failed. T h e Cambodian
bombing is only the most blatant deception. When the
President announced that American forces would leave
Cambodia June 30, he also declared that U.S. planes would
act in Cambodia only as "continued interdiction opera-
tions against enemy lines of supply and communications
in Cambodia.".
The use of American jets to carry out bombing in
support of Cambodian troops, no matter how desperate
the situation for the Cambodians, constitutes a new esca-
lation of the Indochinese conflict. The people of the Unit-
ed States are entitled to know the tuth about the status
of the war in Southeast Asia, and deserve more than the
denials of the truth and the half-truths supplied by the
United States command in Saigon, the Pentagon and the
President himself.
Once again a U.S. President has abused the trust of
the American people.
-PHILIP HERTZ
Here we go again
Governor Milliken, usually a very quiet and reserved
governor, in fact, almost invisible, has suddenly declared
an all-out war on pollution and drugs-a very popular
position this year. It's odd that he never spoke out quite
so loudly before Sander Levin made such a good showing
in the Democratic gubernatorial primary.
-A.C.

By DONALD KUBIT
The screen version of the suc-
cessful off-Broadway play The
Boys in the Band is.now showing
at the Campus theater. When the
play opened, before the days of
gay liberation, it was met with
strong reaction by people who
thought it immoral to discuss
homosexuality. Now, gay libera-
tionists are opposing this film on
the grounds that it does not give
an honest representation of their
cult. They are right.
The Boys in the Band is an
antiquated view-of homosexuality.
The "boys" are guilt-ridden, frus-
trated indviduals, who ban to-
gether because deviants seek so-
lace in company. Perhaps, this
was the case five or ten years ago,
but the gay movement has aban-
doned the closet and is one of the
most active and aggressive move-
ments in America. The population
of over 4,000,000, homosexuals is
making their presence known.
The fault of The Boys in the
Band is that it shows trapped men
trying to.escape what their society

has labeled erroneous. Hostility
nurtured by guilt permeates their
gathering and in the end we are
shown men broken and befuddled.
The main event is a birthday
party thrown by debt-ridden Mi-
chael (Kenneth Nelson) for his
best friend-enemy Harold (Lean-
ard Frey). The guests include a
conglomeration of stereo-types in-
cluding a, flaming queen, an ex-
husband, a black handsome athlete
type and so on. The frivolity is
cooled when a straight (Peter
White) invades the premises in the
form of the hosts ex-college
roommate.
After the straight has gotten
over the shock that his old buddy
is not what- he expected, Michael
decides they should all play a
telephone game, which will create
even greater anxieties and frustra-
tions. The result backfires on the
host and we see him for all his
Roman Catholic inhibitions. The
party has turned into a dissecting
table and the guests go their sepa-
rate ways, presumably back into
the shadows of the street.
The original Broadway cast re-

creates their respective roles and
the camp humi'r of gay bars is
repeated with a humorous and
cutting intent.. This brand of
humor is quick and decisively fun-
ny and it establishes the fact that
gays are capable of laughing at
themselves.
As a movie The Boys in the
Band is an example of improper
directing. The intimacy of the
stage production is destroyed by a
camera technique that seeks in-
tensity by searching troubled
faces. But in lingering too long,
it fails to catch the reactions of
the other characters on stage.
What Director William Friedkin
has done is merely film the play
as he would see it if he was sitting
in the theater, thus he gets stuck
on items he believes to be the most
interesting, and misses the rest of
the action.
As a movie with brilliant wit
such as Cliff Gorman's portrayal
of the "flaming faggot" The Boys
in, the Band is enjoyable. How-
ever, as a perceptive look at homo-
sexuality, Mart Crowley's venture
is behind the times.

FOR RENT
1 AND 2 BDRM. furn., ideal for 2-3
women, A/C, parking, near State and
Packard. 769-7455 or 761-2423. 18071
HOSPITAL AREA -- Two bedroom, 4-
man, furnished, parking, individual
storage lockers, laundry facilities.
$215 per month includes heat and
water. Campus Management, Inc., 662-
7787. l7Ctc
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10A0/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
Ctc.
GARAGES-May be locked, lease, 723
Packard near State. 15C71
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
Open until 9 P.M.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
TENTS-TENTS-TENTS
We need many tents for the first week
in Sept. Have a Tent? Want some ex-
citement? Call us 10-5 763-3102. This
is as important as your apt. Itself.
CD71
STATE STREET MANOR
1111 S. State Street

Circumventing the Senate

By BILL ALTERMAN
LAST WEEK'S signing of a new
defense agreement between
the U.S. and Spain is just one
more example of how this country
manages to get itself into trouble.
According to the treaty, Spain
will allow the U.S. to use its bas-
es inareturn for military and eco-
nomic aid to the Franco dictator-
ship.
Back in 1953 when the treaty
was first agreed upon, the state
department decided to term it an
"executive agreement" because as
such, it doesn't need approval of
the Senate.
Sen. William Fulbright (D-
Ark.) who was very unhappy with
the treaty, demanded that it eith-
er be submitted to the Senate for
approval or that public hearings
be held. State department offi-
cials informed congressional aides
'that "plans for an early signing
were being put off and therefore
there was no rush" in deciding
how to handle the proposal.
But, having temporarily delay-
ed any possible hearings, the
state department suddenly re-
versed its stand and made plans
to sign the treaty as soon as pos-
sible.
WE THUS HAVE the state de-
partment going ahead and mak-
ing policy on its own - deliber-
ately circumventing the -constitu-
tionally required approval of the
Senate.
Nixon cannot afford to have the

treaty publicly debated. Many in
the Senate are actively opposed to
our ties with Spain, and at a pub-
lic hearing they might be able to
swing public opinion against the
administration's- stand. Having
dealt the administration this blow,
the Senate would be in a much
stronger position to reclaim their
perogative to make foreign policy.
As it is now, that policy is made
by a small homogeneous g r o u p
which lives in an outdated world
where Franco was one of the no-
blest allies of the U.S.
SIXTEEN YEARS AGO we also
viewed South Vietnam's President
Diem as our ally-he was against
communism and for democracy.
Coming just after the McCarthy
scare, the American public was
willing to go along with the deci-
sion to involve U.S. advisors in
Vietnam. At that time it seemed
like a good investment.
As the years passed, however,
our aid to Vietnam snowballed and
with it the government's propa-
ganda offensive.
NOW WE ARE involved in
Spain. Like the Vietnam of the
last decade, the U.S. Army is slow-
ly becoming entrenched. History
repeats itself as we continue to
solemnly sign military aid pacts
which deepen the U.S. military
commitment.
It is because of the debacle in
Vietnam, that the administration
is not prepared to allow any in-

2, 3, or 4 man large apts.
air-conditioned
tremendous closets
loads of parking
laundry facilities
1-864-3852
1-838-7800

Ctc

vestigations into the Spanish com-
mitment. The public is not in the
mood at the moment to allow for
any situation that clearly might
lead to more Vietnams. So the ad-
ministration, which still thinks
this is the era of "creeping com-
munism", will silently renew our
commitments to any country that,
professes anti-communism - no
matter how fascist or dictatorial
that country may be.
Unfortunately, if the present
policy continues, someday the U.S.,
armed with its military commit-
ments, will again battle a revolu-
tionary movement.

NIGHT EDITOR: LINDSAY CHANEY

TXtic00

$AKC 1K)
THE1 SUN)-

&IThM TO
-flf IAA V-

WOATCUI 1116c
OUTS FI'r'
OUT TO A -

AM I W..,

FURN., MOD. 2 BDRMS.
911 S. FOREST
near Hill St.
3-man, $77/ea. 4-man, $65/ea.
CALL 668-6906.
46Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fail. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 15Ctc
2-MAN, 1 BDRM. modern apt. near hos-
pital, modern kitchen, A/C, balcony,
Aug. '70-Aug. '71. $190. 769-4269 after
4. 7C66
AUGUST OCCUPANCYi
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets, storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Ctc
NEED AN APARTMENT
AND/OR ROOMMATES?
MEET YOUR
MATCHMAKERS
Chris & Nancy . . .
Who will help you select your
modern, bi-level apt.
Several furnished 2 & 3 bedroom
apartments still available at con-
venient campus locations.
Dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, bal-
conies, 11/ baths, air cond., park-
ing, laundry & storage facilities.
24 hour maintenance service.
CHARTER REALTY
665-8825
1335 S. University
9Ctc
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS ?
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM: FO-
Super Slims .....6.50
Button-Fly .......6.50
Traditional...... 6.98
Bells:...........7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS.........2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's ... 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's...... .6.98
Nuvo's . ......8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam'sIStore
122 E. Washington

FOR RENT
FURNISHED, spacious 1 and 2 bdrm.
apts., all conveniences, air condition-
ed, undercover parking. 1-864-3852.
50tc
4-MAN
ON CAMPUS
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3or 4. $260/
mo. Featuring:
Dishwasher
Balcony
Air conditioning
Laundry
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36C71
ANNOUNCING
Eastern Highlands
Exciting living in largest campus
luxury apartments.
0 Fully furnishedatwo bedrooms
0 one and two bedrooms 0 one and
half bathrooms 9 swimming pool 0
air conditioning 0 on EMU campus
(just 6 miles from Ann Arbor).
While they last these luxurious four-
man units are renting for only $245/
mo,
Call 483-7220 or 668-7517
HALL MANAGEMENT COMPANY
16071
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Wall St.-Furnished, new, modern
1 and 2 bedrooms available. 1-864-
3852. 11Ctc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2, 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30tc
APARTMENT LOCATOR-$12.50, 1, 2,
and 3 bdrmn. fal apts. on and off
campus. 1217 S. Univ. 761-7764.n400tc
LOOKING?
why not tell people what you are look-
ing for? Tell them cheaply, yet effec-
tively in Daily classifieds, 764-0557,
11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. CD68
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
TWO BEDROOM, furnished unit, near
law and business schools. Please call
Professional Management Assoc., 769-
4227. 4Ctc
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Several beautifully decorated, fur-
nished, 2-bedroom, bi-level apts.
still available for fall semester.
Dishwashers 0 Vacuum cleaners
1% Baths * Air-Cond. * Balconies
Parking . Laundry and Storage
facilities *0Excellent sound con-
ditioning.
Call the Resident Manager at
761-1717 or 665-8825 or stopin
at the lobby office 12 noon to 6 p.m.
daily, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
761-1717
11Ctc
SANS SOUCI APTS.
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
31Cte
CAMPUS

ROOMMATES WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted, 2-man
apt., own room. 663-2112 or 646-9017.
2Y69,
FOURTH FEMALE roommate needed for
fall. Modern apartment-cheap--cam-
pus/hospital location. Call Nancy,
453-6095 after 3 p.m. 3Y69
GRAD STUDENT to share 4-man hse.
partly furn., yd. and pkg., $50/mo-.
plus utilities. 665-8047, after 6 p.m.
49Y68
FEMALE ADV. GRAD. with car. Share
house thru Nov. $50/mo. Evengs., 665-
9657. 214 Crest. 5068
FOURTH GIRL needed for Carriage
House apartment. Call 665-5606. 51Y67
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to share
2-man apt, on Oakland. 665-2489.
47Y65
ONE MALE ROOMMATE needed for a
4-man apt. for fall, excellent loca-
tion (1 block from Law Quad), 2
bdrms., 2 air conditioners, dishwash-
er. Call 769-6997. 48Y65
WANTED-1 or 2 girls to fill apartment.
Call 761-8693, Barb/Marn. Be persis-
tent. 42Y65
WANTED-2 or 3 girls to fill apartment.
769-3130 after 4:30. 32Ytc
WANTED TO RENT
RESPONSIBLE married student with 2
children seeks furnished 2 bedroom
house, cottage or apartment in or
around Ann Arbor. Is prepared to
accept duties as caretaker to offset
rent. Reply Mr. Walkley, Box 664,
Frankfort, Mich. 49635, 38L68
HOUSING for 2% thru Nov. 21 or be-
fore. 665-6378. 36L67
SENIOR GIRL needs room in house, eff.
apt, or .own bdrm. inmapt. Will pay
up to $90/mo. Nancy, 665-3807 after 6.
3767
1 VERY LARGE room or small apt.,
furnished or unrnished. Anywher
near Ann- Arbor. 663-5512. LD67
MOTHER going to school and2 yr. old
son looking for small apt. or room
with bathroom and kitchen privi-
leges. 769-1447, after 5. Can afford
$75. 33L66
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD for 2 student girls,
linens, quiet area, $23, for fall. 549
4th St. 12E64
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
DUCATI ELITE, 200 cc, 3500 miles, ex-
cellent cond., $300. 769-0992. 48Z67
1970% HONDA 450. 761-3905. 46Z71
1970KAWASAKI, 500 Mach III, 850, 3
months old. 482-5776. 47Z69
HONDA -90, excellent condition. $150.
769-2198, all hours. 45Z65
1968 HONDA S-90, exc. cond., low mile-
age, $200, Call 434-1248 after 6 p.m.
43Z65
'69 350 HONDA SCRAMBLER-Excellent
condition, owned by Honda mechanic.
6-12 p.m., 662-9738. ZD7
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71
BUSINESS SERVICES
THESES, PAPERS (inc. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERI'ENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ptec
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations-
General Office and Secretarial Wor
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
Jc

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INCHES
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UNCONTRACTED.(

Comoro

Additional costs per day after six <
Ads that are 11,, 21h, 31/2, et
average of the lower and highe

1967

Two-door hardtop, V-8, automatic
transmission, power steering, just like
new inside and out. Must see to ap-
preciate. Saline.
T & M Chevrolet
7895 E. Michigan Ave., 429-9481
1N66
BLUE 1964 VW, AM-FM radio, snow
tires included. $280. 668-6046. 50N66
FORD, 1963 Galaxie hardtop, air, 390
cu. in., original owner, very little
rust, good runner, best offer takes.
Call 434-0392 after 5 or weekend.
52N67
MERCURY COMET-1963, 60,000 miles.
Radio, automatic transmission, no
rust, very good condition, leaving the
country. $400. Contact H. Ochoa,
University Towers, 536 S. Forest,
Apt. 6K (anytime) or call 764-4424
(weekdays). 51N65
1965 OPEL, tan, 28 mpg., 47,000 miles,
exe. transportation, best offer over
$425. 663-1401. 47N67
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-1 female cat, grayish fur, white
paws, long hair. 769-1648 or contact
anyone at 326 E. Madison, No. 7,
41A65
LOST- Man's black wallet. LOST Mon-
day night on campus, Call 769-3528,
Ken. REWARD. 42A65
FOUND Champaign colored female
kitten, adorable, owner or interested
party call 665-5364 or 764-4080. AD66
CALICO KITT-CAT LOST Monday at
noon. If found call Michigan Daily
before 5 o'clock, 764-0557. After 5:30,
663-0342. Ask for Cindy. AD66
FOUND - Keys on Packard. 761-6784.
AD66
LOST-Black, brown, and white Po-
meranian (dog), about 10 inches long,
answers to Tootoo. Reward. 663-6070.
AD66
LOST-Male shepherd puppy, medium
size, named Ozone. 769-7694. 39A65
PLEASE - Lost are 2 red notebooks
with important work and indexes for
several books including siddhartha,
Woodstock Nation, Existentialism to
Sartre, The Book, Politics of Experi-
ence. Call 769-4925 and make a friend.
r 36A66

USED CARS
1968 AUSTIN America, must sell immed.
$950 or best offer. 769-3942. Met
CAMARO, '68, auto., p.s., console, vinyl
top, asking $1800. 769-3212. 8N67

,t
;

.I

1967 MUSTANG, excellent condition, 6
cyl., automatic, radio, 22,000 miles,
two new tires, two years remaining
guarantee. $1250. Call 761-4945 eve-
nings. 2N68
'60 VW. $100. Call 769-0162 persistently.
3N66
MGB ROADSTER 1967
Green. Good condition. 769-1318. 5N69
1967 VW BUS; engine with warranty,
good condition. 1469 University Ter-
race, No. 1320, anytime. 4N66
V.W., '70, in excellent condition. Call
761-7492 between 5-8 p.m. 6N68

i

3 days
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

4
1
4

I.

I

2
.1

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - ~ , ~-..

NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
- FOR FALL

T14CRC ARC

I0 K

rr iq5
I

f1Nll flA(ll I.1

sECUR/

i

/

DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38Ctc
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to NYC Aug. 15 or 16.
Call 685-2822 after 5 p.m. 1OG67
RIDERS OR RIDE WANTED to NYC.
Share usuals. Aug. 17th or 18th. Call
764-0510 mornings, 662-0348 evenings.
GD68
WANTED TO BUY
USED RALEIGH BICYCLE. 665-2160.
34K66

HELP WANTED
Registered Nurse
Day shift in modern, pleasant, extended
care facility. 761-3800. 35H71
BARMAIDS~
Full or part time. Apply 208 W. Huron.
31H71
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Full or part time. Apply 208 W. Huron.
32H71
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Acoustic, electric instruments, acces-
sories, David lessons-repairs, Gibson
Harmony. 209 6. State. 665-8001. 10-7
p.m. X

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_,
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