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August 12, 1970 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1970-08-12

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, August 12, 1970

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Vol. LXXX No. 65-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, August 12, 1970 Ten Cents

DETROIT (M - Ralph Simpson, the Michigan State
University basketball standout who signed with the Denver
Rockets of the American Basketball Association for a
reported $1 million, has filed a suit asking up to $3 million
against the Rockets, the ABA and league commissioner
Jack Dolph.
Simpson is also demanding that the defendants allow
him to play basketball with the Rockets. He dropped out
of college after his sophomore year to sign under a hard-
ship clause.
Simpson filed his suit in U.S. District Court in Detroit
after basketball officials ruled he would not be allowed
to play for the Rockets. League officials said several weeks
ago that he couldn't play next year after harsh criticism

SEEK TO REPLACE AFSCME

Teastr

organizing

a

-Daly-MOrt Noveck
RALPH SIMPSON, former Michigan State star shown driving by Michigan's Rod Ford (43) last
season, has filed a $3 million suit against the Denver Rockets, who signed him, the ABA and its
commissioner. Simpson is challenging the league's decision to bar him from playing for the next
two years. He was signed after his sophomore year, but the ABA nullified the contract after out-
cries from the NCAA.

SUNNING TIES RECORD

from the National CollegiateI
The NCAA attacked the fact
that Simpson was signed by the
ABA while he was still a sopho-
more at MSU.
The suit asks for a court in-
junction to enjoin ths Rockets,.
the ABA and Dolph from pre-
venting Simpson from playing
basketball this year.
The suit contends that "no
valid, or reasonable c a u s e
exists" to bar Simpson from
playing with the Denver club
and that the Rockets, the ABA
and Dolph "have in the p a s t
allowed certain basketball play-
ers under similar circumstances
. . . to participate and play'
basketball in their professional
American Basketball League."
Normally, players have to
complete their four years of col-
lege eligibility to play profes-
sionally.
Simpson's attorney, Richard
Suhrheinrich, said Tuesday he
will probably ask the court for
an order allowing Simpson to
play before the suitcomes to
trial.
Simpson's suit asks for $1 mil-
lion actual damages and three
times whatever amount he gets
if he wins the suit, or up to $3
million, according to Suhrhein-
rich.
The suit claims the "arbi-
trary, discriminatory, capri-
cious" acts of the defendants
threatens Simpson with "loss of
professional skill, loss of poten-
tial earnings from personal ap-
pearances and endorsement of
products customarily received
by prominent professional ath-
letes."
If he is not allowed to com-
mence play with the Rockets
when the ABA season opens Oct.
1, Simpson "will suffer irrepar-
able harm," the suit contends.
Simpson signed a contract
last March 17 to play profes-
sional ball with the Rockets.
He was a teammate of Rocket
star Spencer Haywood when
both played at Detroit's Persh-
ing High School. Haywood left
the University of Detroit a year
ago after his sophomore year to
sign with Denver, also under the
hardship clause.

Steeler is.
miffed b
1-A status
MIAMI (P) - Muscular Mike
Haggerty of the P it t s b u r g h
Steelers contends his draft clas-
sification was made 1-A "be-
cause I'm a pro football player.
and the 245-pound tackle is
suing the government.
. "If I was a normal citizen, my
case would have never been re-
viewed," Haggerty told the Mi-
ami News' Al Levine after the
Steelers' 16-10 preseason loss to
Miami last Saturday night at
Jacksonville.
The former University of Mi-
ami lineman was ordered to re-
port for a preinduction physical
on July 28, 1960, and it was de-
termined that he had a bad
back. Haggerty said it was
spondylolythesis of the fifth
lumbar vertebra,
Haggerty's classification was
1-A before the examination, but
instead of any change in status
his case was shipped to the sur-
geon general in Washington.
It was announced on Jan. 19
of this year that the 24-year-old
Pittsburgh player "is medically
qualified for employment, en-
listment or induction under
Army regulation 40-501."
Noted stud
passes away
LEXINGTON, Ky. (P)-Cita-
tion, the last horse to win
racing's Triple Crown and the
first to win over $1 million, died
Saturday night at Calumet
Farms where he was foaled 25
years ago. Cause of death was
believed to have been old age.

Athletic Association.

Governorsk
jokef
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller of New
York, right, jokes with Gov. and
Mrs. Linwood Holton of Vir-
ginia as they prepare to attend
the State Dinner and Ball dur-°
ing the National Governors'
Conference near Osage Beach,
Mo.
--Associated Press
CLAIMS $1 BILLION SAVED
Nixon vetoeseducation,
agensscyae Pe aporato

Pirates, Mets both lose

By The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH -'Billy Gra-
barkewitz hit a three-run homer
and Claude Osteen, with relief
help from Jim Brewer, won his
first game in six weeks as the
Los. Angeles Dodgers defeated
the Pittsburgh Pirates 5-4 last
night.
Grabarkewitz s 1 a m m e d his
13th homer of the season in the
second inning after Tom Haler
and Ted Sizemore singled.
The Dodgers got another-.run
in the fourth off Bruce Dal Can-
ton, 7-2, when Sizemore singled,
stole second, went to third on
catcher M a n n y Sanguillen's
- throwing error and scored on a
single by Osteen.
The Pirates came back in the
fourth on a two-run double by
Al Oliver and scored another run
in the fifth on a single by Matty
Alou and a double by Gene Al-
ley.
* * *
Machine mugs Mets
CINCINNATI - Tony Perez'
tape-measure grand slam homer
paced the Cincinnati Reds to an
8-1 romp over the New York
Mets last night as Gary Nolan

scattered seven hits for his
eighth consecutive victory.
Perez' 35th homer of the year
carried about 500 feet into the
top deck of the left field stands,
giving the Reds a 4-0 lead in the
second inning.
Lee May slammed his 24th
homer in the seventh off Rich
Folkers and Johnny Bench, the
major league home run leader,
tagged Folkers for his 39th with
one on in the eighth.
Bunning notches 100th
HOUSTON - Jim Bunning
became the second pitcher in
major league history to capture
100 victories in each league,
stopping the Houston Astros as
Philadelphia moved to a 6-5
triumph last night.
The 38-year-old right-hander,
who won 118 games with Detroit
of the American League, held a
6-1 edge in the ninth and was
working on a six hitter.
But Joe Morgan opened the
ninth with a homer and the As-
tros ripped four more hits off
Bunning to get within 6-5 be-
fore Dick Selma could get the
last out and protect the victory

in Bunning's fourth attempt at
the elusive 100th NL triumph.
Bunning has a 218-168 life-
time mark, winning 118 in the
American league. Hall of Famer
Cy Young is the only other-
hurler to win 100 or more games
in each league.
Surprise ! Tigers win
MILWAUKEE - Don Wert's
run-scoring single with two out
in the sixth inning gave the De-
troit Tigers a 2-1 victory over
the Milwaukee Brewers last
night.
Wert's hit off Al Downing
scored Bill Freehan and decided
a tight pitching duel between
the Milwaukee left-hander and
southpaw Mike Kilkenny of the
Tigers, who gained his seventh
victory in nine decisions with
ninth inning help from reliever
Tom Timmerman.

U.S.
bills

Union o
local in P
the past w
in what c
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Mitch G
University
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Charles H
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needed to
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"If we s
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force us t
possible st
McCrack
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labor orga
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restricting
talking to
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said Jame
and union
"It's comr
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Thiry sa
tion paper
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ratifying t
shop stewa:
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failure of 1
ances vigor

HIPPIE INVASION FEARED
PGA play begins tomorrow

V V t 4§S4 y }; ! i4," V

,;

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

xBaltimore
New York
Detroit
Boston
xCleveland
Washington

East
71
62
60
56
56
52
West

L
42
51
53
54
58
62

Pct.
.628
.549
.531
.509
.491-
.456

GB
9
15%
13%

Pittsburgh
New York
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal

East
w 1
64
60
59
54
53
49
West

L
52
53
56
60
60
67

Pct.
.552
.531
.513-
.474
.469
.421

GB
21
41
9
91
15
12
21
211
26
32

Minnesota 69 52 .622 -
xCalifornia 64 49 .566 6
xOakland 64 50 .561 61_
Kansas City 42 71 .372 28
Milwaukee 42 74 .360 29
Chicago 42 75 .359 30
Yesterday's Results
Detroit 2, Milwaukee 1
New York 7, Chicago 1
Washington 3, Minnesota 2, 11 inn.
Baltimore at California,inc.
Cleveland at Oakland, inc.
Kansas City at Boston, ppd.
Today's Games
Detroit at Milwaukee
Baltimore at California
Cleveland at Oakland
New York at Chicago
Kansas City at Boston
Minnesota at Washington

%

Cincinnati 78 39 .667
Los Angeles 64 49 .568
San Francisco 55 58 .487
Atlanta 55 59 .483
Houston 51 64 .442
San Diego 45 70 .390
Yesterday's Results
Atlanta 1, Montreal 0
Cincinnati 8, New York 1
Philadelphia 6, Houston 5
Los Angeles 5, Pittsburgh 4
St. Louis 11, San Diego 10
Chicago 4, San Francisco 1
Today's Games
Montreal at Atlanta
New York at Cincinnati
Philadelphia at Houston
Los Aungeles at Pittsburgh
San Diego at St. Louis
San Francisco at Chicago, day

TULSA, Okla. (R) - Ben Hogan withdrew,
X there were rumors of a nude hippie invasion
and Arnold P5almer braced again for a shot at
the one major championship that has eluded
hin.
Hogan, a living legend from another era of
golf, told officials Tuesday that his ailing left
%- knee, encased in a steel brace, was hurting
him so badly he was forced to pull out of the
%± PGA national championship that begins tomor-
row.
Hogan, 57, a four-time National Open champion,
has been in Tulsa for several days and played
a number of practice rounds. He limped badly.
"The knee wasn't too bad over the weekend,"
he said, "but it started acting up Monday. Now
I just can't do it." He said the heat wasn't a
factor. One hundred degree-plus temperatures
and high humidity turned the South H ills
Country Club course into a steam bath over
the weekend, but cooled off considerably early
this week.
"It's not the heat," Hogan said, "it's just this
gimpy leg."
Palmer, meanwhile, played a practice round

with England's Tony Jacklin, the U.S. Open
champ, and, naturally, drew the lion's share
of the gallery. Palmer, the 40-year-old Athlete
of the Decade, never has won the PGA, the one
big one that got away in his storied career.
.But the story that had the pros, and everyone
else, tittering was the report that a flock of
hippies planned an infiltration of the course.
Police Capt. Bill Melton, in charge of the
security forces at the course, received an anony-
mous phone call from a restaurant owner who
said he overheard some hippie-patrons making
their plans.
The strategy, according to the call, - is for five
nude girls to slip onto the course on some pre-
tournament night and lure the guards away
from the 18th green.
While the guards were away, goes the plan,
the male members of the group, armed with grass-
killing chemical spray, would paint the word
"peace" on the 18th green, thus killing the grass
in time for their message to get national atten-
tion when the final two rounds are televised.
The reports were not confirmed, but police said
they were set to handle the situation.

WASHINGTON (P)-President Nixon
yesterday vetoed two big noney bills, one
for education and one for 23 government
agencies. He said that together they
would have added nearly $1 billion to his
budget recommendation.
He said these increases would pose "a
threat to every American's pocketbook."
With his action vetoing the $4.4 billion
education appropriation bill, and an $18
billion measure to run a variety of agen-
cies, including the Department of Housing
and Urban Development, the space agen-
cy and the Veterans Administration, Nix-
on said he was saying no "to bigger
spending and no to-higher prices in the
interest of all the American people."
The President came personally to the
White House press room to make his veto
statement.
In both cases, he said his budget recom-
mendations had been placed at generous
levels.
In a message to the House, Nixon said
his vetoes of the two bills were "painful,
but necessary to hold down the rising
cost of living."
He said "at election time it is tempting
for people in politics to say 'yes' to every
spending bill,
"If I were to sign, these bills that spend
more than we can now afford I would
be saying 'yes' to a higher cost of living,
yes to higher interest rates, yes to higher
taxes."
Nixon said he refused to go along with.
"big spending that is wrong for all the
American people" and he vetoed the bills
because they would add "an extra billion
dollars of pressure on prices."

Nixon said he had to act for all of the
American people and in their interest he
said, "I have drawn the line against in-
creased spending."
He called on Congress "to reconsider
the spending course it has taken, and to
place first priority on achieving our goal:
a healthy economy, expanding through
peacetime activities, with reasonable price
stability."

Nixon said the Independent Offices
Appropriation bill, which includes funds
for urban development, exceeded his
budget request by $541 ~million.
He said he was mindful of the urgent
needs of cities and that his original re-
quest for urban renewal, water and sewer
grants and housing subsidies was double
the outlays in the last fiscal year of the
previous administration.

-Associated Press
Advising the Cambodians
South Vietnamese Army officers look on as Cambodian recruits receive training
in hand-to-hand combat.

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