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May 09, 1970 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1970-05-09

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, May 9, 1970 1

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saura.1.M1yIf .970

I

Knicks

crash

to

first

PLAY TOLEDO TODAY:

title

Al

M' nine drop duo to Hoosiers

NEW YORK OP) - Painracked
Willis Reed gave New York thea
muscle and the inspiration and
cat-quick Walt Frazier provided
everything else as the Knicks
swamped the once-again disap-
pointed Los Angeles Lakers 113-99
last night and won their first Na-
tional Basketball Association title
after 24 frustrating years.
A standing-room only crowd of
19,500 went berserk from the
opening moments when the Knicks
shot ahead and never let up, and
the hysterical fans were left shout-
ing "We're No. 1" when the final
buzzer sounded in this dramatic
seventh game.
After winning their first East-
ern Division title in 16 years and

then beating first Baltimore and
then Milwaukee to reach the
playoff finals for the first time
in 17 seasons, the Knicks entered
this best-of-seven series as the
favorite. But in the end they had
to overcome the crippling injury
to Reed;
Reed, the league's most valuable
player, suffered a severely bruised
hip in the fifth game. He respond-
ed to a standing ovation when he
limped onto the floor by hitting
the first basket.
After Wilt Chamberlain gave
the Lakers their only tie, Reed
hit again in a spurt of seven
straight points and the Knicks
were on their way.
With the 240-pound center

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
PAT ATKINS
muscling the 7-foot-2 Chamber-
lain away from the basket, Fra-
zier then led the Knicks to a 39-
24 first quarter lead that stretched
to 69-42 at the half.
The 6-4 all-pro guard hit 23
points, added nine assists and four
rebound by halftime as the Knicks
outshot the troubled Lakers 58
per cent to 41 per cent and forced
15 turnovers with their pressure
defense.
Los Angeles never mounted a
threat in the final half as the
Lakers' dream for their first title
since moving to Los Angeles 10
years ago ended again in failure.
The defeat was particularly dis-
appointing to Jerry West and El-
gin Baylor, who havehnever cap-
tured the crown in their all-star

By LEE KIRK
Summer Sports co-editor
The Michigan baseball team let
a beautiful spring day and both
ends of doubleheader slip through
their fingers yesterday afternoon
as they dropped two boring con-
tests to Indiana 2-1, 2-0.
The blame cannot be placed on
the Wolverine pitchers, as both
Jim Burton and Pete Helt turned
sterling performances. Burton
fanned ten and Helt mowed down
seven and gave up but two hits
in the nightcap.
The Wolverines just missed ty-
ing up the opener with a belated
rally in the seventh and final
frame. After the first two men had
been retired, pinch-hitter Tom
Kettinger drew a walk and Greg
Buss came into run for him.
Centerfielder Mike Bowen then
lashed a double up the alley in
right-center to put runners on
second and third. Second-sacker
Dan Fife then bounced a single
up the middle to score Buss, but

Tom Boone. the Indiana second
baseman, managed to knock the
ball down on the edge of the out-
field grass.
Bowen, who had rounded third,
slowed almost to a halt and looked
back for the ball, and saw it rcll-
ing away from Boone. He then
broke for the plate. The ball, how-
ever, only stopped about five feet
C from Boone, who picked it up and
rifled it towards the plate. Hoosier
catcher Tim Gehrig took the throwi
and blocked theplate, and Bowen
was a dead duck.
In spite of Burton's strength, the
Hoosiers got their runs in the first
two innings. With two out in the
first, Indiana shortstop Bruce Mil-
ler looped a pop fly that just
eluded three Wolverine fielders.
Burton then uncorked a wild pitch
and Miller trotted down to second.
Frank Grundler then grounded
one up the middle. Shortstop Mike
Rafferty made a fine pick-up and
threw to first although Grundler
had already crossed the bag. The

the d'eit'i

3, .I

Bill Cusumao

throw was wild and Miller ambled
home with the first Hoosier tally.
The ball continued to have eyes
for the Hoosiers in the second as
John Penn opened the second with
an infield single and stole second.
After Boone struck out, Gehrig
dribbled one up the middle that
eluded both Fife and Rafferty*
and Penn scored what proved to
be the winning run.
Hoosier starter Rich Lenard was
not overpowering as he struck out
but one, but the Wolverines could-
n't put anything together against
him until the seventh. In all they
managed but six hits, one less thati
the Hoosiers.
In the second game, Helt was
superb. He faced only three men
in every inning except the fourth,
when he got three strikeouts and
the Hoosiers got two unearned
runs. After Grundler popped to
Fife, Chuck Cline drilled a singled
to left. Cline stole second, but
Helt struck out Penn trying to
bunt his way on.
Then Boone fanned swinging on
a pitch that hit on. the front of
the plate and bounced high off the
backstop. Boone went to first on
the wild pitch and Cline moved t4*
third. Gehrig then delivered a
run-scoring single, Boone stopping
at second. Hoosier pitcher Ken
DeFord, who gave up but four hits,
then hit a Baltimore chop. Helt
got to it in plenty of time and
threw over to first-baseman Bob
Makoski, who dropped the ball#
Boone rounded third and broke
for the plateand. slid in ahead
of Makoski's throw.
The Wolverine bats were muf-
fled in the nightcap even more
than in the first. Only two runners
reached second, and one of these
two was cut down trying to mak
it to third.
Michigan was scheduled to play
a doubleheader today against Ohio
State, but the game has been can-
celed and instead the Wolverines
will play Toledo in a doubleheader,
at Fisher Stadium this afternoon
at 1 p.m.

Tennis squad bests winds
to trounce stubborn Illinois

What do pros play for? Bread? Some people would have you
believe that. But after the New York Knicks victory over the Los
Angeles Lakers last night in the NBA playoffs I. don't see how
anyone can accept it.
The Knicks won the championship with an astounding, even
inspired if you like, team performance. They literally swarmed
over the Lakers, both on offense and defense. With the in-
imitable Walt "Clyde" Frazier leading the way the Knicks forced
the tempo of the contest and showed that defense is, indeed, a
major factor in the NBA.
But over all the steals, fine shooting, team rebounding and
pinpoint passing was Willis Reed, the league's Most Valuable
Player. Reed also was named the MVP of the playoffs to give him
a sweep of the league's honors. The award, thoungh, assumes
enormous significance when you remember that Reed did not play
at'all in one game because of injury and was effectively out of
action for the major part of two other contests.
It was just his appearance on the court that gave Reed his
award and that is some kind of a feat. But it was justified. Reed
gave, his team an immeasurable lift just by coming out to play.
It was the kind of display of courage that one sometimes witnes-
ses in professional sports and causes the realization that it is
truly the game and the pride of the individual that counts in the
end.

careers, losing six1
finals to Boston in
years.

times in the
the last nine

Long-suffering Knick fans who
have waited patiently for their
first championship no doubta
pumped some adrenalin into their
eroes with tireless exhortations.
But-as the Knicks' Cazzie Rus-
sell said earlier in the playoffs- Associated Press
"They on't put the ball in the Superistars Chamberlain and Reed go for title
TO SPORTS ARENA
Student strike effects spread

By ED MORRIS
Although windy conditions in
Ann Arbor yesterday afternoon'
caused tempers to become a bit
frazzled, the Michigan tennis
team maintained enough poise to
trounce Illinois by a score of 7-2.

i

Reed played with pain, quite obvious pain, but he was there,
his name was in the scorebook and the rest of the Knicks felt
they could win. just because of that. Bill Bradley, the Knicks' resi-
dent intellectual, put it.best when he said, "His very presence was
the most important thing."
Forget the fact that Reed helped to neutralize Wilt Cham-
berlain, that he set the picks that the New York shooters need,
that he hit two quick buckets that forced the Laker defense to
loosen up. Just remember the confident abandon that the Knicks
showed in their play and realize that it came from the knowledge
that the leader was present in both body and spirit. The Knicks
were able to play their game just because Willis was there.and it
gave them a championship.
The New York 'players all expressed two sentiments after the
game: that they were overjoyed with winiing and that Reed was
the catalyst. Only Dick Barnett mentioned money and that may
be because the cagey veteran has been to the wars before and
realized the difference between the crinkly stuff that goes to win-
ners #nd the jingly stuff that losers receive. Yet even his comment
came as an afterthought.
For all concerned the true happiness was the team victory and
a sence of awe for the guts that Reed had shown. And just as
his teammates and coach marvelled at what Reed had done, so
will millions of fans for years to come. Big Bob Lanier, speaking
of Reed at halftime said, "He's a tough man." And that doesn't
even begin to explain it.
Reed spent the playoffs battling first Westley Unseld, then
Lew' Alcindor. and finally Chamberlain. He also fought two sore
knees and then- a hip injury. He triumphed over them all. That
is more than tough, that is some kind of man. It is the stuff that
legends are made of.
It is typical of Reed, though, because he has displayed that
type of determination and pride throughout his career. Winning
is his life and, as he told Howard Cosell, "It had to be this year."
And so he played over the pains and reached a summit.
It always has to be this year for Reed because it is the only
way he knows. He alone disproves the adage that pros play only
for the bucks. It would matter to Reed if. it was only a playground
game; he would still kill himself to win.
He didn't kill himself last night but he must have felt like
it at times, even with cortisone shots. But he continued and de-
served every ovation he got. Howard Cosell put it best when he
said to Reed. "You have shown us the limits of what the human
spirit can do." Indeed he did.

By The Associated Press
Student strikes across the na-
tion have begun to affect Big Ten
league championships in baseball,
track, golf, and tennis. At Colum-
bia, the university's varsity foot-
ball team voted to cancel the one
day of spring football practice al-
lowed under Ivy League rules so
that the players could direct their
efforts in supporting the nation-
wide student strike demands.
Over in Amsterdam, a city's bid
for the Olympic games was put in
jeopardy. And in the East, the field
for the Eastern Sprints championI
in the 25th annual regatta held to-
day was narrowed by withdrawals
Boston's Urr
Swith
three awards

because of the Cambodia and Kent!
State shootings protest.
The shutdown of riot-torn Ohio
State could cost the undefeated ,
Buckeyes the Big Ten baseballI
title. Ohio State's baseball team.
with an 8-0 record, canceled dou-
bleheaders at Michigan Stare and
Michigan this weekend.
A Big Ten spokesman said con-
ference atAlietic directors, assem-'
bling Tuesday at Bloomington.
Ind.. for the league's spring meet-
ing must decide what happens if
Ohio State cannot play a full loop
schedule.
The 18-game conference race
which ends the weekend of May
22 entered this weekend with Wis-
consin in second place with 5-1
and defending champion Minne-
sota third with 6-2.
The athletic directors Tuesday
also may be confronted with prob-
lems involving the conference out-
dor track and field meet Pt, In-
diana University, the league ten-
nis championships at Minnesota

ci6 meeting of U.S. state gov-
ernors Monday.I
Love, involved for seven years
in Denver's preparations to get
the 1976 games, was due to pre-
sent Denver's case to the Inter-
national Olympic Committee in
Amsterdam and American dele-
gates said his absence would be
a major blow.
He was elected chairman of the
Governor's Conference two months
ago. Nixon has called the meeting
to discuss the disruption of peace,
violence and potential violence
throughout the nation.

As a team Illinois is inclined to
play a steady, unforceful type of
tennis which is designed to take
advantage of opponents' errors.
Although the Michigan players
generally adjusted well to the
wind-they played aggressive yet
controlled tennis - frustrations
were frequent and swearing,
shouting, and racket tossing were
common events.
In the first single match, Mich-
igan's Jon Hainline played Chip
Clements, an unconventional play-
er who uses an unusual amount of
spin on his ground strokes.
Hainline, playing an aggressive
match, refused to allow Clement's
lobbing and scrambling tactics to
budge his concentration. He broke
Clement's serve at 4-4 in the first
set and coasted after that to a
6-4, 6-3 victory.
Ramon Almonte was Michigan's
only loser in singles as he just
couldn't get started against Rod
Schroeder and lost 6-1, 6-2.

o> HILLEL
r GRAD
x MIXER
£t. SUNDAY7
MAY 10
8:3N.N
A 1429 HILL ST.
# Refreshments 25c

The rest of the singles went to
Michigan, however, as Joel Ross
defeated Rick Wack 6-1, 6-3,
Bruce DeBore defeated Tom Dun-
lap 7-5, 6-2; Dan McLauglin de-
feated Jeff Cook 6-3, 7-5; and
Tim Ott defeated Barry Maxwell
5-7, 6-1, 6-3.
Michigan lost at number one
doubles as the team of Ott and
Ross was beaten by Clements and
Dunlap 6-4, 6-3, but won at the
two and three positions.
But in the other matches, Hain-
line and Almonte defeated Schroe-
der and Wack 6-1, 8-6, and Mc-
Lauglin and DeBore defeated the
Illinois team of Miles Harris and
Jeff Cook 5-7, 6-1, and 6-3.
This afternoon at 1 p.m. the!
Michigan squad meets Purdue.

B3OWLING SPECIAL
3 gamnes$1
Saturday and Sunday 3-11 P.M.
MICH IGAN UNION
*
Mixed leagues forming
SIGN UP NOW!

BOSTON(A') - Bobby Orr, theand the conference golf tourna-
Boston Bruins' bypectacularr,2tement at Ohio State next weekend.
Boston Bruins' spectacular 22-
year-old defenseman, became the It was learned Indiana officiais
second player in National Hockey Thursday held a meeting to con-
League history to win three lea- sider security measures. if war-
gue awards in one season yester- ranted, in conduct of the track
day. meet at the Hoosier track bowl
Orr was voted the Hart Trophy May 15-16.
as the league's Most Valuable The league tennis tournament
Player and the Norris Trophy as is scheduled at Minnesota next
the best defenseman. He had Thursday, Friday and Saturday on
earlier clinched the Art Ross Tro- the Gopher campus where an
phy with a record 120 points, be- ROTC building was set afire
coming the first defenseman in Thursday. *
NHL history to w in the scormg The conference spokesman said!
tit ny Espito, a 27-year-old the baseball problem might re-
quire forfeit of Ohio State's entire

-.

WORSHIP

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Baltimo
Detroit
Boston
New Yo
Washing
Clevelan
Minnes4
Californ
Chicago
Oaklan
Kansas
MiIwaul

Major League Standings

XB

rookiec, aptured two tropies -
the Vezina, Which goes to t h e
goalie on the team allowing the
fewest goals, and the Calder as
Rookie of the Year.
The Lady Byng Trophy for
sportsmanship and clean play
went to veteran St. Louis center
Phil Goyette.

Big Ten record which includes the
only two defeats administered to
Minnesota.
Denver's hopes of collaring the
1976 Winter Olympic Games got
a setback yesterday as Gov. John
Love of Colorado was called home
by President Nixon to chair a spe-

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
W L. Pt.
re 18 8 .692
14 11 .560
13 11- .542
ork 15 13 .536
gton 13 13 .500
nd 9 15 .360
West
ota 17 8 .680
1ia 16 9 .640
11 14 .444
d1V 15 .444
City 9 1 .346
kee 7 20 .259

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
314
4
4
5
8
6
6
514
12

Chicago
New York
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Montreal
Cincinnati
Atlanta
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Houston
San Diego

East
W 1.
14 10
13 14
13 14
12 15
10 13
7 17
West
22 7
16 11
15 12
14 15
13 16
12 17

PetL
.583
.481
.491
.444
.435
.291
.7591
.592
.555
.482
.449
.423

G

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Molefyt and Paul Swets
10:30 a.m.-"Oasis in the Wasteland," Dr.
Calvin Malefyt.
6.30 p.m -"Sufferinq," Rev. Paul Swets.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.--Eveninq Prover.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.

214
34

5
6
9
10

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
UNITY CENTER OF
PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY
310 S. State
663-4314
Mrs. Eleonore Kraft, Minister
Sunday Service-11:00 a.m.
Study Class-Mrs. Kraft-7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Prayer and Counselinc--10:00 a.m. Wednes-
day.
Center Is Open-Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
11-2; Tuesday, 3-6 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-For sure, plus any other time we
happen to fall in together-Come and find
out.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
Church School and Services, 10:30 a.m. -
"The Family Under Pressure."

ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1679 Broadway
(at Baits Drive-North Campus)
12:15 p.m.-Holy Eucharist.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
S On' the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
10:00 a.m.-"A Look Into the Heart of the
Home," Rev. Terry N. Smith preaching.
THE ARK
1421 Hill-761-1451
Communal Dinner.

M

Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 6, Chicago I
KansasCity 9, Detroit 3
Minnesota 7, Cleveland 6
Bostgtn at Oakland, inc.
New York at California, inc.
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
Boston at Oakland
New York at Cali~ornia, night
Washington at Milwaukee, night
Kansas City at Detroit
Minnesota at Cleveland
Chicago at Baltimore

Yesterday's Results
Houston 1, Pittsburgh 3
Atlanta 8, St. Louis 7
Chicago 10, Cincinnati 7
Los Angeles 8, Philadelphia 4, 12 inn.
San Diego 11, Montreal I,
2nd game inc.
San Francisco 7, New York 1
Today's Games
San Diego at Montreal, night
San Francisco at New York
Los-Angeles at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Chicago
Pittsburgh at Houston
St. Louis at .Atlanta, night

Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr.,
W. C. Wright

LUTHERAN STUDENT
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor

CHAPEL

R. E. Simonson,

U ofM
Charter Flight to EUROPE
COST: $215 per person

Worship Services-9:30 and I :00 a.m.
Church School-9:30 and I1 :00 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders, John R.
Woser, Harold S. Horan
Worshio at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets

SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Matins.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Discussion Group.
9:00 p.m.-Worship (Freedom Meal).
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-Supper Program (Wesley Found
ation).
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor

I}

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