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August 11, 1970 - Image 1

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Publication:
1970-011, 1970-08-11

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9

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V-

4

I F I V 4 5 4 * 6

Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, August 11, 1970

Against
'The Wl
There's no news ...
...so we wrote this
By BILL ALTERMAN and LEE KIRK
TH1E DAYS when news from' the wide world of sports came
from just the playing fields apparently have died unnoticed.
I can't say I'll miss them.
The dust has settled on the football strike and the exhi-
bition season got underway marred only by an abundance of
rookies at a few games, and finally the view is clear enough to
make some sense out of reason that the players walked out.
There are few more dangerous occupations than play-
ing football. Injuries are frequent and in many cases they
can end a career before it begins. Deaths due to football
injuries have occured even at the pro level. Players who play
pro football deserve compensation from on the job injur-
ies just like everyone else: Basically, the players struck for
security.
Despite its glorification by alumni and the mass eye of
television, college football is played by college students. (The-
oretically) these athletes go to class and are involved in student
activities and protests just like you and I. Last year, at several
colleges notably Washington, Wyoming and Indiana, the foot-
ball coach got into a dispute with his black athletes.-
Many coaches apparently feel that a player has sold his
mind and body to the team when he joins. It is their belief
that any activity detrimental to their glorified image as an ath-
lete, is reason enough for their dismissal. It is the image of a
player long dead but still beating in the hearts of a few "old-
school" coaches.
So far Bo Schembechler has handled this type of prob-
lem wisely and discretely. When middle guard Henry Hill
was placed on probation for his activities during the BAM
strike, Schembechler was astute enough to separate Hill
the tackler from Hill the black.
This fall, however, things may become more complicated.
In March there was no conflict for black striking athletes. Dur-
ing the upcoming football season though, the possibility lurks
that some sort of protest will be in order when the Regents are
forced to deal once again with the BAM demands. It will be
interesting to follow the actions of both the coach and the
players if and when such action is necessary.
Michigan's misinformed Minnesota maniac continues in his
daring belief that, despite dropping three in a row to Oakland,
the-Twins will arise victorious in the American League's West-
ern division and furthermore, revenge last year's debacle against
Baltimore by sweeping the Orioles three straight in the fall. In
the World Series, he further predicts, the gallant darlings of
the Midwest will go on to whip the vaunted Big Red Machine.
Motes from the underground: The Tigers will not win it
this year. Surprise, surprise, surprise! Only a little more
than three weeks ago, they were three games back, but since
then, everything that could go wrong has. The one-two
punch of Willie Horton and Jim Northrup werebsidelined
with leg injuries, and even though Northrup is back and
ripping the ball, the Tigers are dead without Horton. Wil-
lie's ankle injury is now said to be much worse than first
thought, and rather than risk further damage, the Tigers
will probably keep him out for the rest of the season.
Another factor in the Detroit demise has been the rever-
sion of the bullpen to its early season form. Through June and
most of July, the firemen didn't lose a game. Without a con-
sistent starter in sight, the Tigers suddenly have found them-
selves with no consistent hurler. Maybe they should have canned
Mayo Smith instead of Johnny Sain.
It occurs to us . . .
All of you intrepid basketball fans on the hill are going to
have a rough time of it trying to dribble the ball from hoop to
hoop on the decidedly soft and slow court known as Palmer
Field. Aside from serving no useful purpose, the backboards are
a curse to all dedicated frisbee players who consider Palmer
Field their home turf. (Maybe they're making plans to pave the
field over?) Oh well, it will make the post pattern a reality for
football games up there.
That the athletic department has a lot of gall to charge
students 25 cents per hour to use the tennis courts next to
the IM Building while the courts on Palmer Field are free.
Students line the athletic department purse enough as it is,
and the cost of maintaining the tennis court cannot be as
large as, say, keeping the pools filled with clean water and
manned with lifeguards.

It is also galling to be charged by the hour. Tennis isn't
played by the hour, and charging for it that way is like paying
the president a. salary determined by the number of bills he
signs.
Ere I end some beautiful friendships, I would like to say
that. the Athletic Department is doing a whale of a Job with
their free summer recreation program. The thousands of kids
and the coaches working with them are having a ball, as it
were.
As you doubtless can imagine from this trivial column, the
two of us are exceedingly bored. If anyone out there cares to
give us some companionship, feel free to drop in anytime at

Bu s walk
Tigers get

plank;
seven

Special

report on 6

oose

ZZI P

~See
~taI

in

ninth -still

lose

Vol. LXXX, No. 64-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Tuesday, August 11, 1970 Ten Cents

By The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - Tom Seav-
er fired a six-hitter and won
his 17th game of the season as
the New York Mets, taking ad-
vantage of three Pittsburgh er-
rors and 11 walks, crushed the
Pirates 10-2 last night.
Cleon Jones doubled to start
the Met second and with one
out, Wayne Garrett drew a walk
from Dock Ellis and Jerry Grote
singled to fill the bases. Oliver
threw wildly to second on a po-
tential double. play ball, letting-
in two runs.
Tommie Agee and Ken Har--
relson followed with singfes to
load the bases again. Ken Bos-
Authoar
IBouton
retires
HOUSTON, Tex. (P) - Jim
Bouton, author of "Ball Four,"
one of the most controversial
books ip the history of baseball.
was placed on t h e suspended
list yesterday of the Oklahoma
City farm club of the Houston
Astros.
He immediately announced
his retirement in Oklahoma
City.
The recent publication of the
book which is rather critical of
some of baseball's greats and of
Richardson and Houston Man-
ager Harry Walker had drawn
no fines for Bouton but he had
been called in for conferences
w i t h Baseball Commissioner
Bowie Kuhn and with Houston
officials.

well walked for another run
and Donn Clendenon drove
home the first with a sacrifice
fly.
Five walks by relief pitchers
Dick Colpaert and Jim Nelson
and a sacrifice fly by Grots
scored two more in the fourth.
The start of the game was
delayed 27 minutes when fire-
men shutdown power lines con-
trolling the lights at Three Riv-
ers Stadium as a precautionary
measure following a fire near
the new park.
* * *
Boston beans Bengals
BOSTON - Billy and Tony
Conigliaro, Boston's s l u g g i n g
brothers, led the Red Sox to an
11-10 victory over Detroit yes-
terda despite a seven-run rally
by the Tigers in the top of the
ninth.
Detroit, trailing 11-3 going to
the ninth, knocked out winner

Sonny Siebert and Sparky Lyle
before Chuck Hartenstein final-
ly came in to strike out Bill
Freehan with the tying run on
first.
Pinch hitter Gates Brown,
Jim Northrup and Norm Cash
each drove in two runs with sin-
gles and another scored on Mike
Andrew's error.
Billy Conigliaro, who joined
Tony in the starting outfield
June 19, drilled his 15th homer
with two on base in the four-run
fourth inning. He also singled
twice and drove in a run in the
eighth.
Twin~s trumped
MINNEAPOLIS-ST. P A U L
-Rick Monday hammered out
a homer, two doubles and a sin-
gle and the Oakland A's bom-
barded .the Minnesota Twins
7-3 yesterday with a 19-hit at-
tack.

BLUES
X10,000

FESTI1
TO!

rL

SUFI

$20,000

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

NATIONAL IEAGUE
East

Baltimore
New York
Detroit
Boston
Cleveland
Washington

W L
71 42
61 51
60 53
56 54
56 58
51 62
W~est

Pet.
.628
.545
531
.509
.491
.451

'GB
9
11
13
15x ,
20
61.
7
20
29y%
30

Pittsburgh
New York
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
Sal Francisco
Atlanta
Houston
San Diego

W
64
6
58 5
53
52
49 6
-West
77
63
55 5
54
51
45 6

L
51
52
56
60
60
46
39
49
57
59
63
69

Pet.
.556
.537
.509
.469
.464
.426
.664
.563
.491
.478'
.447
.395

GB
2
51,4
10
101
15
1_
20
21>'
25
31

Minnesota 69 41 .6;
California 64 49 .56E
Oakland 64 50 .56
Kansas City 42 71 .37
Milwaukee 42 73 .36
Chicago 42 74 .36:
Yesterday's Results
Boston 11, Detroit 10
Oakland 7, Minnesota 3
other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
Detroit at Milwaukee
Baltimore at California
Cleveland at Oakland
Minnesota at Washington
Chicago at New York, day
Kansas City at Boston

?7
56
61
72
5
62

Yesterday's Results
New York 10, Pittsburgh?2
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh
San Francisco at Chicago, day
San Diego at St. Louis
Montreal at Atlanta
New York at Cincinnati
Philadelphia at Houston

Final rites for slain judge
Father John Tierney says a final benediction yesterday in San Rafael, Calif., beside the casket of Judge Harold Haley who
was slain Friday in a van that three San Quentin Prison inmates and an accomplice used in an escape attempt.
KRASNY ON CAMPUS VIOLENCE

Deaths here

a possibility'

By
The Ann
ended Sund
ter" financi
ler, presiden
Center (UA
of the event
co-sponsor,
for the festi
Sandler e
although he
servative esi
ber of the
mittee, said
could be as r
Whipple
due to "No
field costs.
installations
(David) A]
hitched her
$200, things
Although
lost money,
"A great sF
The loss
peril. "If wi
in donations
can keep the
will save m
have anoth
Discussior
ested memb
mittee and,
cover some o
Although
the plannir
gram to sa8
discussed. Id
general don
Sandler said
the Blues I
Attendanc
was about 8
below that n
ing to Sandy
steering com
Turn I
today's D
three-day
along wi
Krulwich
the Goose I
held near
The Blues
marred by
have been
festivals arc
Ann Arbor
said yesterda
good co-opa
zers and vol
two arrests
fenses but t
related to th
arrested wer
The arrests
festival grou
The perfc
they enjoye
Williams, oi
the festival
er" for blu

By PHILIP HERTZ
Kent, Ohio; Jackson, Miss.; Lawrence,
Kan.-the death toll in the nation's uni-
versity cities continues to rise as the
year progresses, and as the deaths mount,
the question more and more in the minds
of many University students has become,
"Can it happen in Ann Arbor?"
Ann Arbor Police Chief Walter Krasny
says it could. "The answer to that ques-
tion is always an unknown," he says. "It's
very unlikely, but it could be a possi-
bility.
"When you go into a total situation,
you're worried about someone losing his
cool. You can't always control the human
mind," Krasny adds.
Krasny says, however, the experience
of most of Ann Arbor's patrolmen lessens
the likelihood of shootings during a stu-
dent disturbance at the University.
"When you have trained officers, you
don't really have to worry about it hap-
pening. The problem arises when you
bring in auxiliary units, who are usually
inexperienced, untrained and poorly
briefed," Krasny explains.
Krasny notes the problem with using
auxiliaries is in "choice of assignment.
They should be given traffic duties," he
says. "It's when they are given other
tasks that the problems arise. There is
a tendency when you're not properly"
briefed to react only to what you see and

The police chief says he could visualize
a shooting occurring in Ann Arbor only
"if there's positive evidence that police
are being shot at."
Even then, he says the firing would nc
be haphazard. "In such a situation v
would return fire only with a highly
skilled squad, and definitely not into a
crowd."
Krasny says the Kent State shooting
did not prompt any special action on the,
part of the Ann Arbor Police Dept. "We
have sent men to specialized schools to
come back and retrain men, but often the
training has not been suited to our prob-
lems."
However, Krasny says he is interested
in some of the techniques developed by
the Berkeley, Calif. police for quelling
riots.
The Berkeley police ° have obtained
wooden pellet and bean bag guns, which
will be used in place of conventional fire-
arms. These devices are supposed to in-
flict little more harm than tear gas.
"We're looking into it," Krasny says,
"but we don't anticipate using them now.
The division of _ police authority on
campus has come in for- severe criticism
from students because jurisdiction is split
between the Ann Arbor Police Dept., the
Washtenaw County Sheriff's Dept. and
the State Police. Krasny, however, feels
this is a minor consideration.

a business-like manner," he says. "If
you're operating under a central control,
as we have ususally done in the past,
there should be no problem. If you get
an individual leader who goes off on his
own, then you'll have problems."
Krasny says the University administra-
tion has always cooperated with the po-
lice and adds that the appointment of
Col. Fredrick Davids to the newly-create.,
post of Director of Safety at the Univer-
See KUASNY, Page 9

Reggie Smith scores for Boston as Bill Freehan catches the ballC

Chief Krasny

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