100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 29, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-29
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



S
Page Six

IF

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 29, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 29, 1970

0 ,/Nlke wonsod 4 aw iiiiv ftms.fottf# r14&4 o
i MW qmCw' vbriefs
wtV V1016tion of 44t # M- 4" to tto*te
By The Associated Press
DR. THOMAS PAINE is resigning as administrator of the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, effective Sept.
15, the Western White House announced yesterday.
In an exchange of letters, President Nixon wrote Paine, who has
headed the space agency since October -1968, that "I deeply regret"
the decision to leave the post and "it has been a privilege to know you
and to work with you and to share with you the sense of excitement,,
adventure and achievement that has marked this time of triumph in'
the nation's space program." -
Paine was apparently discouraged over the substantial budget
cuts which NASA has been experiencing, especially in the last year.
THE EASTERN SEABOARD was shrouded in an annoying
haze yesterday as cities from New York to Atlanta experienced
one of the more visible, but not yet dangerous, sieges of air pol-
lution.
The weather bureau at midafternoon said atmospheric conditions
in a seven-state area bounded by Philadelphia, Atlanta and Chat-
tanooga could cause potentially serious air pollution problems. Little
general relief was predicted before tomorrow from high temperatures,
oppressive-humidity, and the haze.
THE MICHIGAN COURT OF APPEALS yesterday dismissed
charges against a defendant who claimed that an illegal search
led to his being charged with possession of marijuana.
The case parallels a recent State Supreme Court ruling that
struck down a portion of the Michigan constitution dealing with evi-
dence which may be admitted in court.
In a section protecting citizens from "unreasonable searches and
seizures," the state constitution declared that such items as narcotics,
firearms and bombs were not to be barred as evidence in court.
The high court ruled that the exemption provision was contrary
to provisions of the U.S. Constitution dealing with unreasonable
search and seizure.
A CRIMINAL COURT JUDGE in Montevideo, Uruguay who
sent several terrorists to jail was kidnapped yesterday by youths
who identified themselves as Tupamaros, members of an urban
guerrilla organization.
Soon after the kidnapping, and the attempted abduction of a
union official, police clashed with students who erected barricades in
streets near university campus.
The university, along with a secondary school, have been closed
since last Thursday because of student disorders.
-U-

PREDICTION BORNE OUT:.

6-

U.S.-Canada political relations
begin to show signs. of strain

OTTAWA -(A') -- As Canada's
foreign secretary, Lester B.
Pearson said in 1951: "The days
of relatively easy and automatic
political relations with- our
neighbor are, I think over." -
The statement drew wide-
spread- comment at the time.
including some criticism, on both
sides of the border. Today the
same opinion likely would bring
a "what-else-is-new?" reaction.
.In recent years, as Pearson
forecast, the complexities of the
relationship have spawned many
issues between Canada and its'
neighbor. The issues range from'
the area of defense to Canada's
proposal to curb Arctic pollu-
tion. Washington opposes the
bill, now before Parliament,
which would extend Canadian
jurisdiction 100 miles seaward
from the Arctic coast for the
purpose of pollution control.
One ingredient in the new,
more hard-nosed regime of re-
lations between the two coun-
tries has been whatisome call
a rising tide of nationalism in
Canada. Another is the present
time of troubles that the United
States is going through, domes-
tically and in Southeast Asia.
J. J. Greene, Canada's minister

of energy, lumps the two in-
gredients together in a cause
and effect relationship.
"Part of the cause for the
rise of that new Canadian na-
tionalism and determination to
build something unique rests in
the malaise that exists in. your
land-what appears to many as
the sudden and tragic disap-
pearance of the American dream
which, in some ways has turned
to nightmare," Greene told a
meting of U.S. oilmen in Denver
last week.
This came toward the end of
a speech in which he criticized
Washington for imposing re-
strictions on imports-of Cana-

dian oil to the U.S. market.
Canada did not find the controls
"compatible with-the traditional
basis for trade and economic
relations between the United
States and Canada," Greene
said.
Rightly or wrongly, the con-
trols have been interpreted by
many Canadians as part of a
U.S. squeeze play through which
Washington hopes to obtain
Canadian acquiescence in a pol-
icy for developing the con-
tinent's resources.
In a speech at Buffalo Greene
applied pressure to another
trouble spot, Great Lakes pol-
lution.

Capth
By JOHN BECKLER
Associated Press Writer
WASHINgTON (-) -- The
struggle between President Nix-
on and the Democratic-con-
trolled Congress has reached a
new level of intensity with the
approach of the November elec-
tions.
Political sniping that has
popped sporadically since the
Nixon administration took of-
fice has become almost a daily
occurrence and both sides are
bringing heavier weapons into
play.
Nixon is openly threatening to
use his veto power to try to keep
Congress in line; the Democrats
on Capitol Hill are busily fash-
ioning legislative booby traps
they hope to smuggle into the
White House.
With control of Congress at

stake in the elections the rival
strategies are clear: Nixon and
his fellow Republicans hope to
pin a "big spender" label on the
Democrats and blame them for
any economic ills that still beset
the nation. The Democrats hope
to portray themselves as the par-
ty -with a heart, putting human
values above money values--
while still rejecting the spender
-tag.
Nixon is at a -distinct disad-
vantage in trying to exercise
control over a legislative pro-
grai with the Republicans in a
minority on Capitol Hill.
The Democrats forced him to
accept $600 million more for
education and $500 million more
for fighting water pollution than
he wanted to spend last year,
and are preparing to send him
an education appropriation bill
4 that is $452 million over this
year's-budget.
Nixon's veto of a bill providing
hospital construction funds last
month was easily overridden by
both the House and Senate, with
most of his own party deserting
him. Republicans, too, have to
run for re-election. The result
was not only a blow for- Nixon
personally, but it damaged the
effectiveness of the veto.
So disastrous was the veto, in
fact, that Republican leaders in
Congress are advising Nixon to
avoid using it on such popular
DIAL 5-6290

I.

l

vs. Nixon:

72

U

MICHIGAN REPERTORY 70
--uniersity players--
TONIGHT
garson knin's
BORN YEST ERDAY

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Air Conditioned

8:00 p.m.
Ph: 668-6300

I

ULYSSES'A SUPERB FILM!".
-Life Magazine

t FAE
Corner State & Liberty Sts.
Tpngggmggr.

OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Feature 20 min. later
Dial 662-6264
2nd WEEK

"A SUPERB
FILM !"zn
---Life Magazine

UJOYCE
~?'! j..'Admitance wi be deni
* -.all under 18 years o
Starnng MSO OS' A - BABARA JEF
MAURICE ROEVES - T P. McKIENNA - ANNA MAN
Prouce an Oetedby JOSEPH I SRICKy - Screnplay by JOSEPH STRICK ad FOH FiE
A WAFTE.R ilAOE ORGANIZAIeON PRESENTATION - Released by rtv\'1

"Stunning in Its
Frankness Yet
Lyric in Its
Visualizations.
Nothing Short
of Brilliant.
Flawless Cast."
-Judith Crist
"TI©N
"This is not a
picture to be
,PS enjoyed only by
those who know
the book"
aid to
oa --San Francisco
ErtRO
NAHAN Chronicle
HAINPS
"LIKE A
VOLT JOLT
FROM THE
THIRD RAIL !
It Hits Even
Harder on the
Screen Than it
Did on the Stage!"
-Time Mqcozine

_,w l I i - L
1214S. University.
DIAL 668-6416
OPEN 12:45
Complete Shows
At 1 P.M.-4:15-7:20
ENDS TODAY!
OF BEAUTY, SEX AND DRUGS
A Cinema V Release
At 1 P.M.-4:15-7:20x
PLUS
AT
2:30
':05
& 9:20
SWOPE"
TOMO BROW
Mart Crowley's
"Tu~t 1u41c
IN Tilt IANL)"
...is not d musIcal
ACnemC Rrneas
ANational G e s Re.,a
Goi y -m r,4

spending programs as education
and health. They want him to
let the fattened-up bills become
law without his signature and
then issue a hot blast at Demo-
crats and say he will not spend
the money.
In its own way, Congress has
been vetoing most of the major
legislative proposals Nixon has
sent it. Gathering dust in com-
miteee rooms are administration
bills dealing with revenue shar-
ing by the states, draft reform,
crime, and manpower training.
Major achievements of the
Congress so far-tai reform, a
$24.8-billion school aid bill, ex-
tension f the vote to 18-year-
olds and continuation of the
Voting Rights Act of 1965-were
all engineered by Democrats,
frequently over strong admin-
istration opposition. They pass-
ed their own $3.2-billion crime-
fighting bill while Nixon's pro-
gram is still in committee.
Where Congress has not sat
on administration bills, it -has
undertaken to reshape them so
the Nixon label will not show.
A case in point was the recent
administration proposal to spend
$1.5 billion to help 0school dis-
tricts desegregate.
On the ground that Southern
school districts are facing the
most difficulties in desegrega-
ting, Nixon proposed an alloca-
tion formula that would put
about two-thirds of the money
into the South. But Southern
school officials had better not
start counting it.
The bill now is being worked
over by a House education sub-
committee dominated by North-
erners who regard it as an at-
FMNGNACATHEATRE R ECORP ORATION
An NEATA ENERAL COMPANY
FOK VILLGE
375No.MAPLE RD.-7694300
MON.-FRI. 8:15 ONLY_
SAT.-SUN.1:00-5:00-8:30

I

603 E. LIBERTY ST.
NOW SHOWING
SHOWS
AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
Box office opens
12:45 P.M.
When they take you
for an out-of-toumer,
they real"y take you.

I

hrea ts,
tempt by Nixon to reward the
South for finally facing up to
court-orderedk desegregation. It
is being drastically revised and
if anything at all emerges it will
call for spreading the money far
more widely than Nixon pro-
posed and probably contain so
m many conditions for getting it
that the South won't be in-
terested.

I

President Nixon
Daily Official Bulletin
Day Calendar
Wednesday, July 29
Music for the Disadvantaged Student
Lect.: Sonja Hawbaker, Navajo Metho-
dist School, New Mex., lecturer, 2043
Sch. of Music, 3:30 p.m.
Audio-Visual Center Films: The In-
heritance, Labor Relations: Do N o t
Fold, Staple, Spindle or Mutilate, Mul-
tipurpose Rm., Undergrad. Lib., 7 p.m.
Dept. of Speech - Michigan Rep-
ertory '70: Born Yesterday, Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater, 8 p.m.
The Baroque Trio: Nelson Hauenstein
flute; Florian Mueller, oboe; Lawrence
Hurst, double bass and Charles Fisher,
harpsichord: Rackham Lect. Hall, 8
p.m.
General Notices
Students who expect to recefive MA or
Professional Degree thru Rackham in
Aug. should check tentative degree list
in lobby of Rackham Bld:'. If your
name is not on list, see your Div. Re-
corder at once.
Aug. Teacher's Certificate Candidates:
All requirements for teacher's certifi-
cates must be completed by Aug. 7,
teacher's oath should be taken soon as-
possible in rm. 2000 Univ. S e h o o 1;
Placement Office mat. can be obtained
from that office in the SA.
Foreign Visitors
' The following can be reached thru
Foreign Visitors Div., Rmis. 22-24, Mi,
Union, call 764-2148:
Pedro Ortiz; Civil Engin,, Caracas,
Ven, July 29-Aug. 1.
Jesus Villarroel; Sanitary Engineer,
Caracas, July 29-Aug. L
Maria Sanabria; Civil Engineer, Car-
acas, July 29-Aug. 1.

I
th
on
pe
si
ex
Co
fo:
B
rp:
th
to
-
ry
w
tli
wh
fla
Te
c:
er
1s
it
te
h
Pa
er
a
th
in
ti
a
l
Pn
s
at
T
P
N
A
h
Pt
a
il
a
h
in
a
$
b
d
a

PARAMOUNT PICTURS PRESENTS
JACK LEMMON SANDY DENNIS
A NEL SIMOLSTORY
THE0UT-O-TO WNERS
COLOR BY MA4OA A PARAMOWIJT PICTVRE R

L,10t Century-Foe prtsents
C.* SCOTIT/ MAL DEN
A..Q..t , G oG-9,S tPalt/-o . -tAOtral0-',N R8,,
11 i x\ i i rM asoai

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING RESULTS-USE THEM
Thursday Only, July 30
de, . g
dir. George Manupelli, 1970
Benefit showing for White
Panthers (where ever they are)
T&9 Architecture -
662-8871 75cAuditorium

i

"TOLD WITH BRUTAL
ELOQUENCE! Shirley Knight
is close to perfect --
startling! Al Freeman, Jr.
is excellent!""-Brendan Gill,
The New Yorker
"A STRIKING EXPERIENCE
AND ONE WITH AN
IMPACT THAT IS ALL BUT
UNFORGETTABLE! Creates
a shattering impact. A
vision of undiluted harsh-
ness and language oft
untempered fury!"
-Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review
"THERE HAS NEVER BEEN
s. £tixANYTHING LIKE THIS ON
x " THE AMERICAN SCREEN!"
. - William Wolf, Cue Magazine
LEROI JONES,
the Water Reade Organization Pesents
SHIRLEY KNIGHT
AL FREEMAN JR.
10ONE UNDER18 YEARSOf AGE WILt BE ADMITTED
-rouer GENE PERSSON * Assoc. ProducerHY SILVERMAN *Music by JOHN BARRY . Director ANTHONY HARVE
A GE.NE PECMSSWV NT 10---S LTD. MScN.ATION - PRWT *Y MN 09 AG

A dvertising Career.?
The University of Michigan only offers classroom exposure to advertising
(i.e. theory and prerequisites).
5+ ..LI.
offers you EXPERIENCE in selling and servicing local advertisers,
layout, design and copy writing, and promotions.
s
Stop by 420 Maynard St.
Mon.-Fri.,1-4 P.M., and start your career
N

4/
5/

:!

-,
..:/
<< ,

Hey There! Hi Thei
Friday & Saturday
THE SORRY
with BILL. HI
Instrumentation: Guitars, Bani
fiddle, dobro, hand horn, ka
Wilkinson's thumper, if t
ONE & ONE HALF DOLLAR!
RFS PRESI
FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT'S-
.T
H
TONIGHT! 7, 9,
CANTERBURY HOU
NEXT WEEK: BERGMAN

EY

F{~I P'TH 5Forum
PIPTI4 AVXNLMAT LIURNT
DOWNTOWN ANN ARSUON
uIcRMAgTION 781270
DOUBLE FEATURE
"Dutchmn"--6:30, 9:45
"Ulysses"--7 :30 only

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan