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July 25, 1970 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-25
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Saturday, July 25, 1970

Saturday, July 25, 1970

P

A

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DIAL 5-6290

Inventor of H-bomb
- blasts campus unrest
WASHINGTON -t?) - Nuclear weapons pioneer Edward
Teller asserted yesterday that student protest, if unabated,
will weaken national defense and invite a foreign takeover in
20 years.'
Teller, testifying before the President's Commission on
Campus Unrest, based the grim forecast on grounds that "in-
doctrinated young people will not take a defense-related job."
The hearing was the last of a series in Washington. Com-
mission Chairman William W. Scranton announced that an
investigative team is now in Jackson, Miss.,, preparing for
hearings there next month over the May slayings of two
youths at Jackson State Col-
r° lege.

603 E. LIBERTY ST.
NOW SHOWING
SHOWS
AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00 &9:05 P.M.
Box office opens
12:45 P.M.
When they take you
for an out-of-towner,
they really take you.

Gov't

a

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Day Calendar
Saturday, July 25
Cinema Guild: The Horror Chamber
of Dr. Faustus & Hog Wild (short),
Architecture Aud., 7 & 9:05 p.m.
Department of Speech - Michigan
Repertory '70: Of Mice and Men by
John Steinbeck, Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8 p.m.
Recital: Martha Nasat, piano, Sch. of
Music Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Degree Recital: Carole Halmekangas,
organ, Hill And., 8 p.m.
Monday, July 27
Music for the Disadvantaged Student
Lect.: K. Iverson, Chicago, lecturer,
2043 Sch. of Music, 3:30 p.m.
Audio-Visual Center Films: "CBW:
Tht Secrets of Secrecy" & "Voyage- of
the Enchanted Isles," Multipurpose
Rm., Undergraduate Lib., 7 p.m.
Summer Concert Series: James Ma-
this, pianist. Rackham Aud., 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
All season ticket holders for home
footbal games must have applications
In by Aug. 1 to retain seating priorities.

Teller, a University of California
physics professor, said student
movements are forcing univer-
sities away from defense research
and that while "those of us who
are older can carry on, it only will
be for a very few years.,
He said the problem will be
critical in another decade, and 10
years after that the nation will
be "disarmed" unless the trend is
reversed.
Speaking without notes, Teller
said universities must "abstain
from politics and protect academic
freedom" even if it means throw-
ing agitators off campus.
- Scranton termed Teller's re-
marks "startling." Commissioner
Joseph Rhodes Jr., a Harvard
graduate student, asked Teller,
"What do you propose to do with
these student protesters, shoot
them?"
"There will be some accidents,"
Teller replied.
"But I can tell you that if we
stop research on defense, and that
research is going on at an ac-
celerated pace in totalitarian
countries, then your freedom of 7
speech will not last much longer
than mine."

WASHINGTON (R - The gove:
to curb mercury pollution under a 1
books since 1899.
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell said U
will se k court injunctions against the
lethal mineral by 10 industrial plants oc
Georgia to Maine and Washington.
Mitchell said the action results fron
Justice Department this week from Secr
J. Hickel.
The 71-year-old Refuse- Act, which
matter except sewage into nearly all U.
penalties of $2,500 fines and one-year j
Department spokesman said the govern
accomplished through coirt injunctions.
"Because mercury pollution is a ve
.light," said Asst. Atty. Gen. Shiro Kashiw
Resources Division.
x Mercury pollution, a matter that ha
attention of the federal government, ha,
4 ~and Wisconsin to be declared off limits1
-Associated Press cases, sport fishing. Canada this spring (
Bomb blast kills telephone executive fishing in Lake Erie and Lae St. Clair b
Hickel two weeks ago sent telegram
Philip Lucier, president of Continental Telephone Co., was killed yesterday in Clayton, Mo. when a informing them that mercury pollution o
bomb demolished his car. The explosion was triggered when he turned the ignition key. Two as- their states had become "an intolerable tl
sociates were uninjured as they stood waiting outside the auto. of Americans."
CHARGES REPRESSION -%

PARA' U ~ fS PRESENS
JACK LEMMON SANDYDENNIS
A EIlSMiMSTORY
THE OUT-O-TOWES
COM rMOW'ELAG A PfME T U CM

Edward Teller
- - -4-Associated Press
pg

We wvant to be
Jour barber!
EXPERT BARBERS-
NO WAITING
DASCOLA
U-M Barbers-
formerly Lee's
E. Univ. at So. U.

WINNER OF
6
ACADEMY AWARDS

University of Oklahoma head

OPEN 12:45 P.M. DAILY
IA I E SHOWS AT 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Feature 20 Min. Later
.NOWCAN A
PLANET LONG ENDURE
Corner State & Liberty Sts. HALF APE, HALF MAN?
DIAL 662-6264
"PLANET OF THE APES" was only
the beginning . . . .

NGC THEATRE CORPORATION
A NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY
FOH VILLGE
375 No. MAPLE RD..7694300
MON.-FRI. 8:15_ONLY
SAT.-SUN. 1:00-5:00-8.30
G;EO)RGE KARL
C. SCOT/ MALI)EN
ii TTON" g ,
PATTG-

reigns it
NORMAN, Okla. (A) - Dr. J. Herbert
Hollomon, who has resigned as president
of the University of Oklahoma, said yes-
terday he took the action to allay the
"strong forces of repression" unleashed
by the governor of Oklahoma.
Hollomon said he feared for the fun-
damental freedom of the university stu-
dents and faculty to maintain views con-
trary to "the accepted style."
Gov. Dewey Bartlett, who made repeat-
ed public attacks on Hollomon's handling
of student antiwar demonstrations last
May 12, launched an unsuccessful attempt
to oust him last month.
Hollomon fought around the clock then
to save his job. Why did he relinquish it a
month later?
"The governor obviously intended to
continue his attacks on me," Hollomon
said. "I could stand it, but this (his
resignation) was the only way I knew

i~ dispute with

Gov.

to give the university, as we know it, a
chance to survive.
"No charges of any substance were
made against me," he said. "In no case
has there been any question of the im-
provement, progress and development of
the university-which is what I'm sup-
posed to be doing.
"But the repressive forces are so great
that anybody who differs from the ac-
cepted style can be destroyed, and through
him, these forces can destroy universities
as we know them. -
"The reason I resigned was that I
refused to be the symbol by which the
governor and repressive forces would get
at the university and its students and
faculty."
The governor last month attempted to
persuade the university's seven-member
Board of Regents to replace Hollomon,
Student and faculty leaders, in a series

of meetings with the regents, said that
Hollomon kept OU open at a time when
many schools were closing. And they said
there was no property destruction or
serious injury during antiwar demon-
strations.
The regents voted 4-1 to retain Hollo-
man, with one of his foes abstaining and
another, the regents' chairman, protested
by boycotting the meeting and later re-
signing in protest of the president's re-
tention.
"The governor has no desire to carry
this any further," said a Bartlett aide
yesterday. "The man is leaving and that's
that."
Bartlett issued a terse statement wish-
ing the outgoing president good luck "in
the future" and calling for "the students,
the faculty, the alumni and all citizens
of the state" to unite behind his suc-
cessor.

tiril
d+
pr
LONDON
demanded
tion in ParlI
let-proof sc
Irishman w
grenades of
House of Cc
High on I
er security
a shield be
the public g
can watch
Laborite
u r g in gt
warned: "O
lem of marr
dom that ti
enjoy and t
safeguard t
and statesn

- -
PRESENTS
James Mahi
Young Texas Piano Virtuoso
in the fourth and final concert m
of The Summer Series
Mon., July 27
at 8:30
IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
REVISED PROGRAM
Sonata in E-flat, Op. 27, No. 1 ....,. Beethoven
Suite in A minor, Op. 143 . . Schubert
Sonatine. .............. . . . ..... Ravel
Fantostuecke .......... Schumann
Nocturne in E minor (Op. post .) .Chapin
Scherzo in C-sharp minor, Op. 39 .......Chopin
TICKETS: $5.00-$4.00-$2.501
at
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR
Office Hours: Mon. through Fri., 9to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium box office 1 112 hours before performance time)

MEIRO-GOJN. AYER PRESENTS A CARLO PON I PRODUliON
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PTERNAKS
DOCfOR ZIIIVAGo
GERALZNECHAPUN 'JULIE CHRIE 10M OURTENAY
ALEC GUINNES "SWBAMoKENNA -MRALHD "H~)O
OMAR SHAm oiROD SIBGER SAFNGHAM
ROBERT BOLT-DAVID LEAN IN PANAVISION'AND METROCOLOR
SATURDAY, SUNDAY-5:30 and 9:00
MONDAY, TUESDAY-7:30 only
F iPTH FOrUm
3 OWNTOWN ANN ARSORPPHAMU TLBRYI ____________
INFORMATION 761-8700
-DOUBLE FEATURE
"LIKE A VOLT JOLT FROM STARTS WEDNESDAY
THE THIRD RAIL!" _ Tune Mag
THE WAITER READE JR JOSEPH STRICKPRODUCTION
THE WAILER READE ORG6ANiZATiON PRESENTS
SHIRLEY KNIGHT' AL FREEMAN, JR.
r-.
DURCHM RN t I r 16 I
S Based on th Award Wdmittae will be dnd
Le Roi Jones. OW OURWaCE - Oansm a tor. .

St. Ignace police
arraign Plamondon

Three leaders of the White
Panther Party were arraigned
on a number of charges yester-
day following their arrest on
Thursday in St. Ignace.
Lawrence "Pun" Plamondon,
White Panther minister of de-
fense, Milton "Skip" Taube,
minister of the interior- and
John Forest, Detroit region min-
ister of education, were all ar-
raigned in St. Ignace before
Dist. Judge Robert Wood on
charges of carrying concealed
weapons and having them
loaded.
Bail on the loaded weapons
charge totalled $1,500 and $5,000
on the concealed weapons
charge. The bails did not mat-
ter; however, as Taube and For-
est were taken to the Grand
Rapids district office of the Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation,
where they were arraigned ,on
federal charges of.harboring a
fugitive.
Plamondon will be taken to
Detroit today to be arraigned
Monday on charges stemming
from the September 1968 bomb-

ing of the Central Intelligence
Agency's Ann Arbor office.
A year after the bombing oc-
curred, he was indicted by a
Detroit Grand Jury on two
counts in connection with the
case. One charge was conspir-
ing to commit the bombing, the
other was the actual bombing
of the office.
The conspiracy charge carries
a five year maximum sentence
,and a $10,000 fine. The bombing
charge may lead to 10 years im-
prisonment and a $10,000 fine.
The Grand Jury also indicted
John Sinclair, currently serving
a 91,-10 year sentence at Mar-
quette State Prison for posses-
sion of marijuana, and Forest,
who was taken into custody the
same day the indictments were
handed down and has been free
on bail, for bombing the CIA
office.
At a news conference yester-
day in Detroit, Yippie leader
Abbie Hoffman threatened an
"act of revenge" within a week
in retaliation for the arrest of
Taube, Forest and Plamondon.

ABBIE HOFFMAN, center, addresses a press conference yesterday where
revenge" within one week because of the arrest of three members of the
left is Genie Plamondon, white panther minister of international affairs
don who was one of the three arrested. At right is Ken Kelley, white p
oration.

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