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July 24, 1970 - Image 5

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-24
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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 24, 1970

Friday, July 24, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page E.ht THEMICHIGN DAIL

The

Louise Bernikow, ABEL, Tri-
dent Press, $7.95.
By DEBORAH LINDERMAN
On Feb. 10, 1962, Colonel
Rudolph Ivanovice Abel (alias
Emil R. Goldfus), a Soviet agent
having practiced espionage in
the United States for nine years,
was exchanged for Francis Gary
Powers, our U-2 man in Russia.
The e x c h a n g e ceremoniously
took place in the early morning
at the midpoint of the Bridge
of Unity in Berlin, was an-
nounced the same day by Pres-
ident Kennedy, and formally
ended the career of the Soviet
"master spy" in this country.
This book documents that car-
eer and the personality of the
shrewd, wry, and self-disciplin-
ed man who "spied"-whatever
that means--for our so-called
top atomic secrets until he was
apprehended in 1957.
His apprehension, which re-
sulted because he was informed
on from inside, caused a hulla-
baloo. It occurred during an-
other phase of the cold war, in
an era of anti-Communist hys-
teria, before the thaw, soon af-
ter the execution of Ethel and
Julius Rosenberg, the arrest of
Morton Sobell, the arrest of

many
not be successful to be criminal
and that the existence of a con-
spiracy had been proven in
court. Although the. United
States press and government
called Abel the biggest and best
spy ever, Soviet reports make
few claims about what he actu-
ally got during all those years.
He has been designated a Hero
and decorated with the Order
of Lenin but it is not improbable
that this occurred as much in
the interests of international
propaganda as to reward his
actual accomplishments.
An offshoot of Bernikow's
new book about Abel is the ex-
pose of the wastefulness of the
spy game, with its elaborate' ap-
paratus, its dangers, the taxing
burden on its agents, and its
meager yield. Certainly this
particular spy is no hero of his-
tory; he is a lonely man doing
tedious and demanding work,
on foreign land, in circum-
stances of extreme isolation. He
is skilled at playing his role--
hiding his identity, handling the
tools of the trade, the hollow
containers, the soft film, the
codes, the microdots, the secret
drops-and at putting on the
right look, the right accent, the
right demeanor. But he does this
not necessarily expecting a pay-

mask4
they took Goldfus in and he fit
very well, an intense looking
man with artistic sensitivities
and an old-worldly style. Life
in the Ovington building was'
casual and friendly. The group
worked hard, shared their ideas,
talked openly but valued their
privacy, and though they found
Goldfus a little vague and con-
tradictory - something about
him didn't fit -- they accorded
him his. Silverman developed,
as they all did, a friendship
with Goldfus that was partly
serious, partly giddy, and .al-
ways interesting. When this
man who was his friend turned
out to be "the enemy's" fore-
most spy, his sense of betrayal
was as keen as his surprise. In-
deed, with the newspapers call-
ing Goldfus "the chief of the
Soviet espionage network in the
United States," all the Ovington
artists had to make the difficult
adjustment of replacing the
reality of Emil Goldfus with a
man who was only an illusion
to them.
Silverman is the silent part-
ner in the authorship of this
book, and one of several people
whose personal testimonies on
Abel added to what was already
known about him from news-
papers and the other media. Yet
this book is not simply a work
of integration, it is a quest for
the man behind the aliases. Sil-
verman and Bernikow set out to
find who Abel was, Silverman
because he had in a complicated
sense been friends and been be-
trayed, and Bernikow because
she was fascinated by the story
of this man with so many layers
and poses. Their effort to recon-
cile Abel's several facets does
not work however; they never
get to the bottom of the man,
and if indeed it is impossible to
get to the bottom of any man.
the gap between Abel's public
aspects - cold, brilliant, and
manipulative - and his private
ones - timid, warm, wry and
witty - was wider than it is in
most men. This gap both de-
fined him as a spy and limited
him as a human being-limited
him at least for others, though
whether for himself is yet an-
other matter. Not the least of
the mysteries is why, having
talent, brilliance and resources,
he should have chosen to use
himself in such apparently emp-
ty and sterile work.
Making do in the federal pen-
itentiary in Atlanta, he wrote to
Silverman and invited a regular

Of

a

correspondence. Silverman con-
sidered carefully, but because of
the situation (having met some-
one in New York through some-
one else, you can be implicated
in anything) and the times
(even Stevenson supporters were
suspect), he refused. The deci-
sion was painful. One of the
most abitious pieces of detective
work that he and the author
undertook in search of Abel was
a trip to Moscow. They had
promising connections and in-
tended to see him, and by talk-
ing face to face to bring him
into focus; but they never -got
their man. The trip was a mi-
crocosm of the whole Abel affair
-they encountered one evasion
after another but left Moscow

S py
was particularly crude; he never
did master English, his tongue
was heavy and got caught in
the strange morphs of the lan-
guage, wreaking grotesque and
comic changes upon it. Most of
his association with Abel was
spent in fear and trembling: he
was stone drunk half the time,
looked absurdly obvious in his
spy costume - an old'" blue tie
with red stripes, and a pipe
which he puffedon in a peculiar
fashion-and was jealous of Abel
and bore him real malice. For
his part Abel must have found
his associate intolerably clumsy.
This book is as much a per-
sonal memorial as it is a jour-
nalistic document; it is inform-
ed by anecdotes and remem-

For Direct Classified Ad Scriice,1ehme 7i0
12NMoon Deadim Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

books bo

"having glimsed our story. In
that peculiar uncertainty about
what was real that hounded us
-from our arrival in Moscow
to Viktor's (their connection)
'nothing at this time'-we had
our landscape. In our own es-
capade-the back-street meet-
ings and the coded communica-
tions and the double-talk, dou-
ble-think, double-faced opera-
tion of ourselves and the people
we met . .. we had out plot. In
the parts of the puzzle, pieces
that never coalesced, prisms of
ourselves, other people's selves,
we found Colonel Rudolph Abel.
If he ever existed."
There is of course no doubt
that an espionage agent who
went by the name of Colonel
Rudolph Abel didin a literal
sense exist. Of the whole ring of
co-conspirators that he was sup-
posed to lead, only one was ever
proved to exist too. This was his
assistant and thegovernment's
informant, a thick Finn named
Reino Hayhanen, blond and
ruddy, who got into the KBG,
realized somewhere along the
line just what he was into and
decided he wanted to get out.
His wayout was defection, and
of course the betrayal of his
superior,
Hayhanen was not a partic-
ularly intelligent man, and he

brances - Emil at -a Jewish
wedding, Emil sketching a nude,
Abel in the prison yard at At-
lanta. And 'while it -is obvious
that Abel was extremely likeable,
admirable, and memorable, this
acount of him strains between
its public and private aspects
without entirely bringing them
into balance. The author's
problematic point of view con-
tributes to this strain, for there
are scenes and events sketched
with sure dramatic accuracy
but left undocumented; we are
told what people looked like and
exactly how they felt, but are
left to wonder how the author
could have known. And though
this kind of fictionalizing could
work very well alone, it is un-
fortunately brought to scale by
some hard-nosed deductive jour-
nalistic reporting in which the
last detail, the finest legality,
the official story, are firmly
nailed down. Moreover, there is
an odd thinness to the book
even though both Abel and Hay-
hanen are characterized with
real magnitude: While it is true
that the whole Abel affair sub-
sists among ironies, perhaps the
fact that the quest for the real
Abel comes to nothing makes
the anti-heroic, anti-climactic
substance of the account seem
less ironic than finally unim-
portant.

FOR RENT
2 BDRM, FURN. units on campus.
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
owl 15t
3-BDRM. on campus apt. for fall. 2
bathrooms, dishwasher, 10 closets, bi-
level. Char or Jean, 665-5269. 34C52
ROYAL DUTCH APTS., 715 Church St.;
Edinburgh Apts, 912 Brown St.;
King's Inn Apts., 939 Dewey, taking
applications for fall rental. Call 761-
6156 or 761-3466. 33059
711 ARCH
Modern 2-bedroom furnished apart-
ments for fall. Ideal for 3 or 4. $260/
mo. Featuring:
Dishwasher_
Balcony -
Air conditioning
Laundry-
Parking
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
36C71
LOOKING?
Why not tell people what you are
looking for? Tell them cheaply, yet
effectively in Daily classifieds. 764-
0557, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 764-0557. DU
AVAIL. FOR SUMME1R & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. 11Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc. 663-
6448. 50Ctc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets. storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest, Ctc
SANS SOUCIAPTS.
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditionedj
Adequate-Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also E
Call 662-2952
31ctc
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2. 3, and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 3Ctc
CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS I
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38te
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS?
VISITF
USFR
FOR

FOR RENT
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Walls St.-Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available,
1-864-3852 or 665-77. 11Ctc
1 OR 2 NEEDED to take over lease for
Sept-May. Beautiful bi-level. Call
769-7467 after 5. 25C45
TV RENTALS--Students only. $10.40/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27tc
FURNISHED-FALL RENTAL
1 and 2 Bedroom Apts.
1111 S. State
1506 Packard
1-864-3852, 353-7389 or
761-236 after 5.
12Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ct
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 5s University 665-8825
loctc
BUSINESS SERVICES
YOUNG WOMAN, six years university
teaching and editing experience, lit-
erature M.A, plus Ph.D. hours, wou d
like free-lance editing or writing.
Excellent references. Call .662-0348
evenings; 764-0510 mornings. JD53
COUPLE WISHES house-sitting spot
for fall semester. Excellent refer-
ences and experience. Call 663-4323.
28J48
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM!
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS 1
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ptc;
MULTI PLE
TYP I NG
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General 0Offce and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD for 2 student girls,
linens, quiet area, $23, for fall. 549
4th St. 3256

USED CARS
FIAT 850 Spider, 1969, good condition.
Call 449-2875. 29N52
ALPINE 1725. 1966. one owner, exc.
cond., no rust, radials, rack, other
extras. $1000 or make offer. 663-7042
after 5. 30N58
'69 FIAT 124 station wagon. Asking
$1700, will bargin. 227-5411. Brighton.
31N52
1965 MG-B, very clean, ex. mech. shape,
3 tops, overdrive, $875. 761-1083 after
5. 26N53
TRANSPORTATION Special! '62 Olds
88, good tires, interior good. must sell
-$100. 663-4879 anytime. 27N55
DODGE Polara 1962-361 hp automatic.
61.000 miles, $225 or best offer. 434-
3195, 763-2227. 28N53
1969 FIAT 124 Sp. Coupe, gold, A/C, 5
sp. trans., radio, new tires. 66381111
after 9 p.m. 24N53I
VOLVO, 1969, red, radio, great car. Call
668-8221 between 5 and 7. 25N53I

The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE
Everything Photographic

I

Louise Bernikowu

Gordon Lonsdale in London, and
at a time when our country
never in the least acknowledged
having any spies at all. After
the fumble over Powers and the
U-2 incident, everyone knew
that the United States also re-
cruited, trained, and sent afield
innumerable secret agents, and
the public image of the spy
slowly began to change. By
1964, spies were much in the
news; a book called The In-
visible Government had much
to say to the public about the
CIA; where the cult of the spy
had once been exotic and bi-
zarre, full of covert rituals and
mysterious meetings, the more
information there was to be had
about it, the more ordinary it
now appeared. Spying was a
public business done by real
men for defined reasons and
with limited aims, some more
sinister than others.
When Abel was caught, how-
ever, the mystique of the spy
was very powerful. Whole ide-
ologies were in question. In the
days of I-Like-Ike politics, Abel
was perceived, by an act of
synecdoche, to threaten nothing
less than the national well-
being. Cliches to that effect
were much in use, and at Abel's
trial the government prosecutor
officially alleged "a serious of-
fense . . . directed at our very
existence and through us at the
free world and civilization itself,
particularly in light of the
times."
The magnitude of this charge
is curious considering the likeli-
hood that Abel's pickings were
quite slim. The decision of the
court that found Abel guilty
stated as much: "It is true that
there is no evidence indicating
that Abel or his co-conspirators
ever succeeded in gathering or
in transmitting any unlawful in-
formation. There is not the
slightest hint in the record that
these espionage agents met with
any success." The court re-
iterated that a conspiracy need

off. Abel probably dug up some
information but he got nothing
very secret or valuable. His
years of dedication and scru-
pulousness, and all the training
and money invested in him, may
very well have ended in a few
pins and paper clips. Spies, like
nuclear deterrents, are kept to
cancel each other out.
Miss Bernikow's book, then.
is in fact about an anti-hero.
and her preoccupation with the
man called Abel is an existen-
tial one; how had he worn his
masks so well, indeed become
the masks, and still remained
himself? How had he juggled all
the identities he was required
to assume and still not lost his
talent for existing inside him -
self? She follows him from his
illegal immigration into the
United States in 1948, using the
papers of a dead Lithuanian,
through several changes of
mask and identity, a man who
moved from one small resident
hotel to another in New York's
upper west side, using various
covers and doing his quiet work,
Her angle on his life comes from
her aquaintance with an artist
named Burt Silverman who
knew Abel - and oddly knew
him quite well-as someone else.
Colonel Abel's last mask was
Emil Goldfus and his last cover
was photographer. As Goldfus-
photographer he rented studio
space in a rather large building
called Ovington Studios situated
on the edge of a wasteland in
Brooklyn Heights. The building
was occupied by many artists
and writers who paid cheap rent
for light and roomy studios, and
here Goldfus set up shop in late
1953.
Among the young artists
working in the Ovington Stu-
dios were Burt Silverman, David
Levine (the New York Review of
Books cartoonist), and Jules
Feiffer--all ambitious, Jewish,
well-educated, left-wing, none
of them established yet, but all
of them soon to be. Gradually'

BIKES AND SCOOTERS
'70 KAWASAKI 350 A7, windshield, turn
signals, cover. Call 761-6547. 38Z53
1948 INJDIAN, 500cc. twin, rigid frame.
springer forks original Indian saddle
bags. $300 or best offer. 761-0745. ZD53
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26271
PHOTO SUPPLIES
NIKON FTN, macro lens, still guaran-
teed, case, $380, lists new $500. Nihon
200mm lens, $145. 769-3169 after 6.
31D5.
NIKKORMAT FTN, 4 lenses, 24mm..
50mm.. 125mm.. 600mm. $550. 426-1
8969. 30D48
AT CENTURY

i
t
V
f

1969 BMW - financial depravity forces
sale of my well kept signal red 2002.
Has slight engine mods, quartz lights
& Halda. Price negotiable. 769-0227.
ND53
FOR SALE-Yellow TR-6, 12,000 miles,
one owner, perfect condition. 769-
2404. 22N52
WANTED TO RENT
WANTED for August only-Small apt.
Call 663-6890. 24L55
RESP. GRAD student needs apt. for
fall. Can afford up to $100 and 20
min. drive to Northeast. Call collect
216-831-1472. 25L57
2 BDRM. unit in house near campus
wkitchen, bath. 663-5967 or 761-7985
--for fall. 22L52
5 Honors College Seniors seek
THREE BDRM. HOUSE
or Apartment for fall
971-2634 or 662-2603
23L5--
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED: Lessons in making pottery,
call Sherry, 769-7397. 31M25
TRANSPORTATION
NEED DRIVER, Bloomington, Ind., July
31. 761-4949. 48053
GOING TO DENVER the weekend of
July 31st. would like one rider. Joel
Epstein, 764-0248. 49G52
FOR SALE
3 TICKETS to Goose Lake for $10 each.
Call Ann, 665-6747. 46B54
PORTABLE STEREO with AM-FM radio,
$75. Call 761-0232. B54
SONY TV, radio, GE stereo, vacuum
cleaner, 6'x9' rug, china, tea table, etc.
Call 769-6568. 45B52
3/4 K. ROUND DIAMOND Engagement
ring, appraised value, $760. 769-4640.
44B52
VM TABLE-MODEL Stereo, mahagony
cabinet. Olivetti portable typewriter
with case. Each $25. Call 764-0510
mornings, or 662-0348 evenings. BDS3
FOR SAL--Small 2 cu. ft. refrigerator,
Sony TC-250 tape deck. Also I need
roommates for fall (or room). Call
Jeff, 663-8440. 39B48
RECEIVER AM-FM stereo, $75; mono-
amplifier, $15. Call 665-2111 after four.
19Btc
ROOMMATES WANTED
FEMALE GRAD seeking 1-2 roommates
for fal. 761-9583, Judi. 22Y53
FEMALE, 21. needs roommates and apt.
for fall in AA, prefer grad, prof. Call
Joan, 1-341-1654 (collect). 23Y53
FEMALE for lg. bi-level apt. in house,
near campus and hospital. Own 1g.
partitioned bedroom. Aug. occupancy
possible. Box 47, M. Daily. 21Y52

BABYSITTER needed nights. Mon.-Fri.
Call 971-5748 before 4 p.m. 19Hte
APPLICATIONS are now being accepted
for executive director of the Washte-
naw Office of Economic Opportunity.
662-3172. 18H59
MALE UNDERGRADUATE to help prof.
(in wheechair) in exchange for room
and board. "61-9034 after 5. 17H53
TEACHERS, counselors, specialists -
Fall openings, many out of state.
Cline Teachers Agency. Box 607. East
Lansing, Mich. 48823. 16H53
LOOKING FOR A JOB?
Talented or experienced or interestedn
in a particular field? Try placing a
Michigan Daily "BUSINESS SERV-
ICES" or "PERSONAL" ad-and help
a job find YOU. HDtcI
HELP WANTED for Mike Stillwagon, 301
yr. old former poverty lawyer now
running for Congress. Straight or
freak - anybody welcome. Call 769-1
3288 or drop in 2004 Traver Rd. 10H53
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-Grey and white tiger cat with
green collar. Green eyes. Call 764-
9270, after 5 663-9026. 30AD54
LOST DOG-Reward will be paid for
recovery of 4-yr. old male brown and
white English Springer Spaniel, miss-
ing since July 1, family pet, not a
hunter. 475-3341 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., or
668-8623 anytime. 29A55
FOUND on the Diag at the Keif pipe
place on Saturday, July 15th, a paper!
bag, a purple handerchief, etc. Call
665-2182 at suppertime. 8AD52
FOUND-1 pair men's (?) tinted glasses,
blue leather case, Sunday night on S.
Univ. 769-4714. AD52
SUMMER SUBLET
PRIVATE ROOM in 3-man. July-Aug.
w/fall option, $50. 665-4557. 18U54
SUBLET-Until Aug. 22, large beautiful
apt, Oakland. 1-785-0743, 17U52
GIRL NEEDED for 5-man apt. Now
thru Aug. 25. $30. 663-6621 anytime.
16U5-
MOD. EFF. for Aug. 5 min. from UGLI.
Negotiable, swimming pool. Cal f663-
7846 after 5, keep trying. 10U46

+I
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DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes
Century Camera
(At our new location)
4254 N. Woodward, Royal Oak
Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd.
LI 9-6355
Take I-94 to Southfield Expr. Nort) to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward and North
(Michigan Bank. Security and Oiier
Charges accepted)
E tA
HELP WANTEDj

Irstru
uses
665-
SUND
GRAD
Sun.
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Ex- Mntells all

William V. Turner, HOOVER'S
F.B.I.: THE MEN AND THE
MYTH, Sherbourne Press, $7.95.
By JIM NEUBACHER
I grew up believing in the
Federal Bureau of Investigation.
I read the teen-market novels
dealing with the exploits of the
"G-Men" and remember think-
ing sadly, at age 10, when I got
my first pair of glasses, that I
would never be able to pass the
physical to be either a pilot or~
an agent of that federal force.
All through high school, how-
ever, I remained faithful. I
made sure not to miss the tele-
vision screening of "The F.B.I.
Story" with Jimmy Stewart and
Vera Miles. It wasn't until my
first year at the University, as
a reporter for The Daily, that
I had my first real encounter
with the "other" F.B.I., the
F.B.I. that lies behind- public-
ity and headlines and propo-
ganda.
Aided by incurable optimism,
I decided that a feature story
on the operations of the F.B.I.
in Ann Arbor would make an
interesting assignment; one fine
day I marched unannounced
into the local office on the sec-
ond floor of the First National
Bldg. in downtown Ann Arbor.
(They have since moved to
Stadium Blvd.)
Gathering my courage, I
walked in and found myself in

a small, cluttered room: tables
filled with reports and papers,
two shirtsleeved men doing
desk work. Real, live G-Men, in
the flesh. One fellow pleasantly
asked if he could help me, and
I explained my request to them.
Alas, it was to be denied (Bur-
eau policy I was informed), and
then the phone rang in another
room. The second agent, who
had remained at his desk, went
in to answer it, and soon after,
called in his colleague. T h e y
closed the door and I was left
alone momentarily.
A minute soon grew into five,
then ten; I stood up and began
looking around. W h a t I saw
made no particular impression
until my eye caught sight of a
copy of The Daily. What I saw
after that disturbed me no end.
Next to the issue of The Daily
was a pair of scissors, and next
to that, the G-Man's handiwork
- a clipping of an article by
Ron Landsman which had ap-
peared the Sunday previous to
my visit. It dealt with a group
of ROTC cadets out on field
exercises- in "counter-guerrilla
training" and other jungle war-
fare techniques. It was a very
straightforward story, done with
the permission of the ROTC of-
ficer leading t h e exercises.
Somehow, it was making its way
into a file in the offices of the
Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Landsman is now working for
the Detroit Free Press, but his
file remains with the F.B.I. The

Free, Press being one of t h e
more enlightened metropolitan
dailies in the country today, his
job is probably not in danger.
The Bureau, launched 40 years
ago, was meant to aid local law
enforcement agencies w h e n
crime spilled over state borders
and to enforce certain federal
laws of specific nature. It was
never designed, however, to be
a national police force. The-
Bureau of Narcotics, the Secret
Service and other Treasury
agents, and the Customs Border
Guards are just a few of the
other federal agents whose job
it is to enforce specific sections
of federal law. Yet, under the
direction of J. Edgar Hoover,
the Bureau has emerged in the
public eye as a coldly efficient
machine, enforcing the law,
gunning down mobsters, catch-
ing the commies, and, of late,
hunting down the hippies. Each
spring we are treated to Hoov-
er's testimony before a House
budget committee wherein he re-
counts piles of statistics amass-
ed by his ever more efficient
agents in the field; behind
those statistics, the real truth
is that these agents are becom-
ing a national police force.
Wiretapping, photo surveillance
of political gatherings, infiltra-
tion of college campuses, and
other distasteful symptoms of
this type of activity point to the
reality.
National 'police forces, turned
(Continued on Page 9)

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