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July 23, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-23
Note:
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F 4 V I

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, July 23, 1970

Thursday, July 23, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Senators
stolen b
WASHINGTON (A) -Large-
scale thefts of U.S. military
munitions bound for Vietnam
have fed the arsenals of vio-
lence-prone revolutionary bands
in California, investigating
senators wer3 told yesterday.
Thefts from Army posts in
California have included ma-
chine guns and dynamite seiz-
ed originally from the private
arms cache of an eccentric mil-
lionaire, the Senate investiga-
tions subcommittee was told.
Charles O'Brien, California's
chief deputy attorney general,

told

munitions

revolutionaries

testified investigators do n o t
know the extent of arms thefts
from military cargoes..
"There's a market now for
grenades and they're stealing
the stuff," said O'Brien w h o
testified California has exper-
ienced 20 bombings a week for
the past two months.
Often thefts from military
cargoes go unnoticed, he said.
But thefts from California's
military posts where munitions
are stored are also common, he
said.
O'Brien testified thieves stole

A ti-pollution bill
hit by House Dems

machine guns, dynamite, rifls,
pistols and ammunition and ex-
plosives from a private 70-ton
arsenal, confiscated in 1957
from California millionaire Wil-
liam Thoreson III, after they
were turned over to the Army
for safekeeping.
Just last weekend, he said,
thieves broke into a muni-
tions storage area at the Pre-
sidio of Califofrnia and stole
300 sticks of dynamite and other
explosives that had been part
of the Thoresen arms cache.
So far this year, O'Brien said,
state and federal police have
recovered a wide array of stol-
en U.S. Army weapons and am-
munition, mostly in the San
Francisco Bay area.
He said these include 94 one-
pound bricks of plastic explos-
ives, 10 bazookas and 39 gren-
ades reported missing from the
inVentory at Ft. Ord, Calif.
Also recovered, he said, were
50 machine guns, 52 rifles, 65
pistols and 65,000 rounds of
ammunition.
"The general tendency toward
blowing things up and burning
things down in our society in-
volves an acceptance of vio-
lence and destruction which is
virtually endemic," O'Brien
said.

NOW SHOWING
AT THE
4%TATE
662-6264
Corner State & Liberty Sts.
OPEN 12:45 P.M.
SHOWS AT
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Feature 20 Min. Later.

"Planet Of The Apes"
was just the beginning..
WHAT LIES ~ '3
BENEATH
MAY BElo
THE END!

Brazilian
GENEVA (A>PThe International Com-
mission of Jurists said yesterday it has
seen secret documents showing that U.S.
experts are helping to suppress opposition
in Brazil by methods which include the
widespread use of torture.
In a nine-page report on conditions in
Brazil the commission charged that par-
ents are tortured in front of their chil-
dren and priests are mutilated in the
presence of brothers of their congrega-
tion. It claimed there are at least 12,000
political prisoners in Brazil and cited
"the daily confrontation between a thou-
sand tortured Brazilians and their perse-
cutors in the barracks and jails of the
country."'
Thereport of the commission, a non-
governmental organization with United
Nations consultative status and supported
by some 50,000 jurists throughout the
world, said Brazil is in a latent civil war
situation in which the government has
launched a policy of "subversive war."
Alleging American involvement, the re-
port stated: "Brazilian officers have
learned such methods from American ex-
perts and theoreticians whom they meet
in great numbers either in their own
military schools in Brazil or during reg-

The commis
is .based on a
the "Flower I;
state of Guan
Janeiro-by a
quested that i
This docume
rooms divided
ilies, including
the two rooms
ly. One group
on in the next
only hear the
bers of the fa
said.
The commis
suffering tol
prevents victir
encouragemen
Citing speci
said Artur G
both 25, were
March, April
In Washing
declined imm
had not receiv
the report.
A source re
briefing last A
partment spol
over allegatio
against politic

to

Rol U.S. i

WASHINGTON (A)--President
Nixon's plan to put the govern-
ment's pollution-fighting efforts
in one agency was described as
lopsided and not comprehen-
sive enough during a congres-
sional hearing yesterday.
The hostile questioning of
Russell Train, chairman of Nix-
on's Council on Environmental
Quality, before a House govern-
ment operations subcommittee
signaled the start of a drive by
some House Democrats to de-
feat the proposal.
The thrust of the questioning
by committee Democrats, led by
Chairman John Blatnik of Min-
nesota, centered around the ad-
ministration's failure to include
all federal environmental func-
tions in the proposed Environ-
mental Protection Agency.
"A great deal more could have
been done to make it more com-
prehensive and unified," Blat-
nik said.
He said the proposal leaves
out many areas of environment-
al research and leaves in exist-
ing agencies enforcement func-
tions such as noise pollution.
"It doubtless will go through
growing pains," Train replied.
The place to meet
INTERESTING people
BACH CLUB
presents
ROXANNA TOURIGNY
soprano, grad
BARBARA SHAFRAN
piano
performing works of
CHERUBINI, BERLIOZ,
RICHARD STRAUSS, and
RACHMANINOFF
Refreshments and FUN
afterwards
THURS., JULY 23, 8 P.M.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
Everyone welcome! (No musical
knowledge needed.)
Further info: 663-2827,
769-2003

"The field of environment is a
relatively new one and will prove
to be an evolving one."
He said the proposed agency
"is not the last word. It's-a start
and a very important start."
"It's a start but a, lopsided
start," Blatnik replied. He said
of the $1.4 billion to be set aside
for the agency, $1.2 billion goes
for water pollution activities.

presents
Buddies inthe Saddle
Rockabilly lives!
8 p.m. FRI. & SAT.
330 Maynard $1 .00

1214 S. UNIVERSITY
DIAL 668-6416
SHOWS AT:
THURS. AND FRI.
7:20 ONLY
SAT. AND SUN.
1:00-4:15-9:20
WHEN TWO PEOPLE
LOVE,
ONE ALWAYS LOVES
MORE
WHEN YOU'RE YOUNG,
EVERYTHING IS
NOT ENOUGH
MORE!
Archer Winston,

NOW SHOWING

- 2 GREAT FILMS -

"PUTNEY
SWOPE"
The Truth and Soul Movie
AND

JAMES FRANCISCUS KIM HUNTER.MAURICE EVANS
UND A RRSO o.Siarein PAUL RnCHAROS -VICTOR BUONO -JAMES GREGORY
E LIN A HAR ISON t~ut JEFF COREY -NA TALIE RUNDY -THOMAS pGOMEZZ 7
and CFHIRItTQN HESTON
Daily Classifieds Get Results
"BES fim Ive seen in years !"
-REX REED
AN AWED ARTISTSFILM
AFo nk e (AtsdP on
"Best Actress-Geraldine Page"
NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW
"NE OF THE
t 1,
YEAR'S 10 BEST"
--Judith Crist --Rex Reed
"A MASTER"--Judith Crist
RANK AP OTE "INSPIRED"-Judith Crist
ELEANOR PERRY "SUPERB"-Judith Crist
GERALDINE PAGE "UNFORGETTABLE"-N.Y. Times
MAUREEN STAPLETON "A JOY"--Cue
MARTIN BALSAM "SPLENDID"---N.Y. Times
MILDRED NATWICK "TOUR DE FORCE"--N.Y. Times
Emanuel L. Wolf presents
An ALLIED ARTISTS Film
TRUMAN
C A POTE'S
let a PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY FRANK PERRY
ADAPTED FOR TFE SCREEN BY ELEANOR PERRY
AND TRUMAN CAPOTE - OFFCAL US ENTRY
CANNES FILM' ES IAL -EASTMAN COLOR
THUR.-"Last Sumer"-
f ('; TH ~orwu M"Trill 7 :15
,,.H AVUNuU AT LUSURTY Trilogy-9 9:00
DOWNTOWN ANN AA80A
1 U IIFORMAATION 701-8700
FRI .-"Summer-
SOON: "Dutchman" /:15, 10:45
and "Ulysses" "Trilogy"--9:00

U.S. FAILS TO FOLLOW

Brita in

on

arms

LONDON (P) - Britain's new Co
government rammed through a noisy
Commons last night its proposal to
to segregationist South Africa.
The action came on a 313-281 vote
Parliament defeated a Labor Party mot
the government to "abandon its pres
tion to authorize the sale of arms
Africa."
A bitter debate preceded the censu
In the exchange, Foreign Secretary A
las-Home insisted that the government
no final decision to sell arms to Prim
John Vorster's South African govern
"Vorster's lying, Vorster's lying,"
Laborite opponents, referring to Brit
paper accoounts quoting Vorster as cla
surances from the new government th
arms sales would be authorized.
White-faced under the heckling,a
said: "Dr. Vorster is aware of our inte
Vorster has known about our intenti+

fts embargo
to S. Africa
)nservative arms to South Africa. He has known as well that
House of there has been no final decision and that is the
sell arms straight answer."
Douglas-Home said Tuesday no final decision
by which had been made, although a letter from Prime
ion urging Minister Edward Heath to Commonwealth lead-
ent inten- ers indicated a position had been reached.
to South The censure motions claimed the sale would
"threaten the survival of the Commonwealth,"
ire vote. damage Britain's interests and flout resolutions
Alec Doug- by the United Nations,
has made Meanwhile, the United States yesterday dis-
e Minister associated itself from the British decision to
nment. sell arms to South Africa and reaffirmed i t s
interjected own embargo on such sales.
,ish news- In a statement couched in diplomatic terms,
aiming as- State Department spokesman Carl Bartch said
at certain "the U.S. government would not be able to as-
Sir A 1 e c sociate itself with any measure which result in
ention Dr. an increase in the flow of arms to S o u t h
on to sell Africa."

Regent Goe
not seek re-i
Regent Paul Goebel (R-Grand R,
day he will not be a candidate for re-e
Goebel formally announced his de
William Milliken. He pointed out the
campaigns for public office and did
another. Before his election as a Reg
been mayor of Grand Rapids, a Kent
delegate to the 1961-62 Constitutional
"The toughest part of my decisic
giving up my association with Presider
the chance to be what help I can to hii
the top university president in the cour
Goebel also commented on the R
outstanding individuals on the Board
to- say who he would endorse as his
the candidates selected at the Re
August," he said.
In announcing that he will not
joins Regent Otis Smith (D-Detroit)
vember that he would not run again.
Goebel plans to continue his fu
University alumni. He was chairman of
and, more recently, has worked to :
President's Club. Membership in the
minimum donation and presently there

-Associated Press
Made in Washington
Economist Paul Samuelson, picturing the nation as going through a "midi-
recession" stamped Made in Washington, called yesterday for giving the highest
priority "toward fighting the economic retardation that is increasing unemploy-
ment and harming living standards."

ular training
Canal Zone."

courses in the Panar

ma

N.Y. Post,
"o kind of
tone poem"

says:

of beauty, sex and drugs:

Bobby Seale placed in
solitary confinement

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (P). -
Spokesman for the Black Pan-
ther Party said yesterday their
national chairman, Bobby Seale,
had been put into a small jail
cell 24 hours a day for stop-
ping a jail guard who was at-
tacking another prisoner.
Seale said he would refuse
to eat as long as he was held in
"dead lock" by jail authori-
ties.
Seale's wife, Artie, read a
statement from her husband
which said he was put in "dead
lock" in a 6-by-7 foot cell at
the State Correctional Center
in Montville.
A spokesman for the Depart-
ment of Corrections said yes-
terday in Hartford that Seale
was now in "administrative se-
gregation."
He was placed in a "cell
closer to 7 by 10 feet with an
adjoining day room" for the
past eight days because he used
"inflammatory language" fol-

lowing the alleged attack July
14.
Seale was a witness. but
not a participant, in the at-
tack, the spokesman said. He
added that he had no knowl-
edge of any hunger strike by
Seale.
The incident is still being
investigated and no charges
were placed against Seale or
other prisoners, the spokesman
said.
Seale, however, said that two
prisoners involved in the inci-
dent had been "falsely charged
with assaulting an 'officer."
Seale is being held for trial
on a charge of murder in the
shooting death of a fellow Black
Panther in May 1969. Police
said Seale ordered the slaying
of Alex Rackley, who in the
police account was a suspect-
ed police informer.
The Black Panther P a r t y,
however, says Rackley was a
member of the party in good
standing.

Cl
"
coror
that
licenr
a for
versi
TI
set o
yout]
versi
ry N
come
May
nigh
with
Do
was
Garpy~fi
shot
car
T!;
into
e
a fu
the
from
churi
drapf

-Asacated Pres
COLONEL WILLIAM ALBOTT, Superintendent of the Kansas
Highway Patrol, stops to talk with youths gathered just off the
Kansas University campus. The area had been the scene of a
youth-police confrontation when a student was killed by gunfire
and another wounded in the leg.

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