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July 22, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-22
Note:
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4

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.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 22, 1970

Wednesday. July 22. 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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'fotllr eat M Cak"t a I! x'"en o
news ,b. brie fs:.
By The Associated Press

IN SUIPREME ,COURT:
Test asked of C.O.
status- for Catholics

i

BRITISH MEAT AND PRODUCE WORKERS tightened the
grip of a nationwide dock strike yesterday as they voted to refuse
to handle any foodstuffs unloaded by troops.
The Central Markets Committee - a union representing all
London markets - decided the dock dispute did not warrant use of
troops as stevedores. The government has said it will send troops in,
if necessary, to unload such vital items as food.
"Members are recommended not to receive such produce," said
a formal announcement by the Committee.
EGYPT'S ASWAN HIGH DAM has been completed after ten
years of work with considerable Soviet cash and technical assist-1
ance. The last of the 12 turbines in the power station began turn-I
ing yesterday.
Sad el Aali, as the high dam four miles south of Aswan is known,
will provide Egypt with five times the existing power output of the
entire country, and is expected to pay for itself within two years.
It will bring into commission more than a million extra acres
of agricultural land through irrigation and provide cheaper power for
industry.I
OFFICIALS OF LIBBY-OWENS-FORD INC. denied govern-
ment charges yesterday of discriminating against women em-
ployes.
Differences in treatment of male and female workers, the com-
pany said, are due to "a basic conflict between the 1964 Civil Rights
Act and Ohio female protective laws."
The U.S. Department of Justice filed suit Monday in Toledo,
naming LOF. sole supplier of auto safety glass for General Motors,
and the United Glass and Ceramic Workers of North America, AFL-
CIO. and its Local No. 9.
HOUSE INVESTIGATORS have called for tougher govern-
ment controls over broadcast news operations after charging that
CBS acted recklessly in filming an abortive Haitian commando
invasion plot in 1966.I
A CBS News spokesman denied the charges by the House Com-
merce investigations subcommittee Monday and criticized the panel's
inquiry as unfair.,
The issue centers around the invasion scheme thwarted on Jan. 2,
1967, when U.S. authorities rounded up a battle-clad, 75-member
force in the act of embarking from the Florida coast.
The report said some events might not have occurred without
CBS inducements, and rejected a suggestion that cash payments to
conspirators were in the nature of payment for releases-legal per-
mission from an individual to film him.
The program was never broadcast.
THE TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT is moving to see
what effect the supersonic transport plane will have on the en-
vironment.
The department will spend $27.6 million to determine effects on
the weather, although William Magruder, director of SST develop-
menit, said the possibility of any adverse effect is remote.

WASHINGTON Ul)-The gov-
ernment asked the Supreme
Court yesterday to d e c i d.e
whether Roman Catholics who
oppose the Vietnam war on reli-
gious grounds are entitled to
exemption from the draft as
conscientious objectors.
The government appealed
from a ruling by U.S. Dist. Judge
Alfonso Zirpoli that the draft
law is unconstitutional in that
some Catholics were forced to
c,; -qse between their beliefs and
prison terms.
The case involves James Mc-
Fadden, 26, of San Francisco, a
Catholic who refused to submit
to Army induction on the
grounds the Vietnam war is un-
just and military duty would
violate his conscience.
Zirpoli dismissed the indict-
ment against McFadden last
February. He said that under
the First Amendment guarantee
of free exercise of religion the
government cannot command a
man to act against his con-
science.
Last month the Supreme
Court agreed to hear appeals by
an ex-soldier and by a convicted
draft evader who claim they
should have been exempted from
the Army as conscientious ob-
jectors.
The Justice Department ap-
peal said the Catholic doctrine
issue raised in the McFadden
case should be decided at the
same time.
McFaden, a graduate student

in philosophy at UCLA last
spring, once studied for the
priesthood. He contended he
must obey the commands of
divine law when his conscience
peceives a conflict with laws of
man.
Various Catholic theologians,
including St.-Thomas Acquinas,
have classified some wars as just
and others as unjust. However,
Zirpoli said, there is no state-
ment by the Catholic church it-
self that the Vietnam war is un-
just.

STEREO SPECIAL
70 watt Monarch Amp
2-8" 3-way speakers
Garrard changer
& Pickering diamond
magnetic cartridge
AN UNBEATABLE VALUE
AT $250
HEAR IT-BUY IT
H Fl STUDIO
121 W. Washington
668-7942
GET YOUR MAN WITH A
Want la:

WASHINGTON (RP) - A Sen-
ate committee was told yester-
day that migrant farm workers,
lowest paid in the nation, are
exploited by Texas politicians
" and huge corporations such as
SmtCoca Cola. .
u j omm toldThe charges were leveled at
the second day of hearings by
the migratory labor subcommit-
tee. On Monday, a team of doc-
tors spoke of wretched living
and health conditions for farm
workers.
Philip Moore -testified that
Coca Cola's wholly-owned sub-
sidiary, Minute Maid, operates
ex 1t farm workers poorly-equipped migrant quart-
er's in Florida.
Moore, coordinator of a Ralph
N a d e r - inspired corporation
watchdog group, said the facili-
ties have no indoor water or
plumbing and conditions gener-

ally are "unquestionably bad."
"But what is worse, even.
than the housing conditions is
the social control that is main-
tained over the life style of the
migrants," Moore said.
In order to live in t h e s e
houses, a family must work for
Coke. If someone is sick, t h e
foreman, not a doctor, can de-
cide whether the person can
stay home," Moore said.
"If the foreman decides that
a worker is not sick, then he
must either work or risk evic-
tion from his house and total
loss of income, housing, medical
support and food."
A lawyer working with t h e
United Farm Workers Organiz-
ing Committee in Texas' rich
agricultural valley, Roger Dun-
well, said politicians such as
Senate candidate Lloyd Bentsen

have
trol
the
migi
town
a k
rule
priv
Dun
B
valle
192(
con
said
only
drug
est
chen
Uni
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thw

RADICAL FILM SERIES PRESENTS
Andrej Wajda's
ASHES and
DIAMONDS
Showsat 7 9, & 1 1 P.M.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 22
CANTERBURY HOUSE
LAST DAYS! DON'T MISS IT!
"'AIR PORT' is a great film all the way!"
- Chicago Daily News
A ROSS HUNTER Production
BURT LANCASTER DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG" JACQUELINE BISSET 'GEORGE KENNEDY
ELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN - MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON - LLOYD NOLAN AUNIVERSALP CTUrOOaC
DANA WYNTER BARBARA HALE *
603 E. LIBERTY ST.
DIAL 1:-:4

'Tiger(
to be abo
SAIGON iVi--- The South Viel
yesterday it will demolish the so-c.
Con Son Island prison and replace tl
cells.
The cells, center of internatior
U.S. congressmen revealed their exi:
be dismantled immediately, a spoke
He added that a survey of Sou
institutions will be made with a vi
as the government can afford.
About 9,000 prisoners are helc
southeast of Saigon in the South I
litical prisoners, and several hunt
confined to the "tiger cages," small
in which three to seven persons are
'' The new cells, said Informat

U-M Barbers
Monday-Saturday
8:30-5:15 P.M.
Michigan Union

5-6290 oft,
BOX OFFICE OPENS 12:45

6:30-9:05

j

.e

I

World's most expensive horse
A world thoroughbred auction record was set Monday night when this full brother to 1969 Kentucky
Derby and Preakness winner sold for $510,000. Frank McMahon, of Vancouver, British Columbia,
made the top bid. He also bought Majestic Prince at the Keeneland sale in 1967 for a then-record
$250,000. Leslie Combs II was the seller both times.
TESTIMONY BEGINS
iColl Ins murder trial:

ROCK MUSIC FESTIVAL
IN JACKSON, MICHIGAN - AUG. 7, 8, 9
ORDER YOUR

I

announces the special engagement of
JAMES TOCCO
United States winner of the Tchaikovsky
Piano Competition in Russia
(Replacing INGRID A EBLER, who is ill)
TONIGHT AT 8:30
in
R akhaii Auditorium
(air-conditioned)
PROGRAM

P QOGg L.2KQ O
CRc elaFaNRCBSGB
116 ~N aL c Co ~sruo T T20
qlNG arm ROS.4s~fl6 iry1

FESTIVAL TICKETS NOW!
Admission at Goose Lake will be
strictly limited to avoidconges-
tion and allow complete enjoy-
ment of the park for all.
TICKET PRICES:
$1 5.00
ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY
ABSOLUTELY NO GATE SALE. 3
DAY TICKETS ONLY. NO READ-
MITTANCE WITHOUT NEW AD-
MISSION TICKET! Tickets avail-
able now by Mail: Send ticket
order, along with large, stamped,
self-addressed envelope to:
Goose Lake Park, Inc.
30999 Ten Mile Road
Farmington, Michigan 48024
Tickets also available at all Hud-
son and Grinnell stores through-
out Michigan. Make certified
check or money order payable
to: Goose Lake Park, Inc. No
personal checks.
For further ticket information call
(313)831-1652.

Sonata in F major, K. 533
Sonata No. 6, Op. 82,
Les Preludes, Op. 28.

Mozart
Prokofieff
Chopin

SWIMMING * PARKING * AMUSE- RI INANEPERMANENT REST ROOMS & FOUNTAINS " REVOLVING STAGE
FRE MENTS " WORLD'S LARGEST " UNLIMITED FOOD & DRINK AVAILABLE AT LOW PRICES
I- SLIDE " OVER-NIGHT CAMPING " GATES OPEN THURSDAY AT 7:00 P.M.
FOR BUS TICKETS : GREYHOUND round-trip transportation direct to Festival is available
by reservation only from the following cities:
IDepart for Festival Depart from festival
check one letter and one number only Fri. Sun. Mon.
Aug. Ag9 Aug.10 }
[ A. Detroit-$6.00 Q F. Indianapolis-$21,40 A.1 10 a.m..................6.p.m1
x 0 .BAnn Arbor-$3.35 G. Ft. Wayne--$10.65 z2 010 a.m.........a.m,.
110 Ba 0 3 3p.m.-..-............------...6 pm. Ia~
W0 C. Kalamazoo-$5.65 Q0H. S. Bend-S10.854 w Q 3 pm. 1 a.m.
IZ Z 5 0 6pm. .....-....,.....6 pmI
l0 O D. E. Lansing-$3.65 1. Cincinnati-$22,80 o 6 0 6 p m.1 a.n 1
1 E. Chicago-$17.50 Q. Toronto-$21.95 A at.
(No one allowed on bus without Festival Ticket w 7 0 10 a.m 6 p mm
Mail checks or money order to:
GREYHOUND TRAVEL BUREAU - 130 E. Congress * Detroit, Michigan 48226
1 NAM E. ___ ADDRESS - _.--
1 AMN'T .CITY & STATE -:-.-PHONE -
"Direct" Buses Will Be Leaving From University of Michigan..

Nguyen Ngoc Huyen, "will not
be the same. They will be dif-
ferent. They w i l be better
ones.
The tiger cages were first
used by the French colonial ad-
ministration in the mid-19th
century, and the Saigon govern-
ment said last year they had
been abandoned. But Reps. Au-
gustus Hawkins (D-Calif) and
William Anderson '(D-Pa) man-
aged to see them and the pris-
oners in them when they visited
the island prison.
The two congressmen and
others in their party said the
prisoners in the cages were de-
nied adequate food, water and
medicine and were subjected to
physical abuse and other mis-
treatmient.
Their disclosure set off an in-
ternational outcry, in the West-
ern world as well as from Com-
munist nations. All condemned
the South Vietnamese govern-
ment for its treatment of the
prisoners and the United States
was criticized because it furnish-
es financial aid and American
advisers to the South Vietna-
mese.
In reply to the criticism, a
spokesman for the Saigon gov-
ernment said those confined to
the cages were Communist in-
corrigibles who had not re-
sponded properly to the prison
re-education process.

Laughtc
By JONATHAN MILLER
The first full day of testimony
in the murder trial of John Nor-
man Collins, the accused alayer
of Eastern Michigan University
coed Karen Sue Beineman be-
gan yesterday. It was notable
not for the Perry Mason type
aura surrounding the stereo-
typed TV murder trial, but for
the slightly unreal, slightly
theatrical aspects of the per-
formance.-
In the afternoon a rather un-
natural joke telling contest was
begun with Judge John Conlin
making the first entry. Either
amused or irritated at defense
counsel Joseph Louisell's ap-
parent inability to refrain froni
terming Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity, Michigan State Univer-
sity, he gave counsel a brief
historical lecture on the inad-
missability of the name of MSU
in the city of Ann Arbor. He di-
rected that, to save Loulsell
from remembering, all ref er-
ences to MSU be entered into
the record as EMU.
Louisell, never a man to re-
fuse a challenge, so it seems,
made his award-winning crack
during his cross examination of
an EMU campus policeman.
While questioning him on the
subject of Collin's alleged pos-
session of a motorcycle, the po-
liceman could describe the ma-
chine in question only in terms
of it being "shiney."
After asking the officer if he
knew much about motorcycles
and receiving a negative answer,

he inquired whether he knew
anything about Sheriff Douglas
Harvey's motorcycle. The court
laughed, but it laughed harder
when Prosecutor William Del-
hey made his attempt with a re-
mark that, to the best of hiss
knowledge Sheriff Harvey did
not possess a motorcycle any-
more. Harvey fractured his ankle
in a motrocycle accident earlier
this month.

Thurmond denies break with
Nixon over desegregation plan

amid

WASHINGTON W)-Sen. Strom Thurmond
(R-SC), made it clear yesterday he has not broken
with the administration because of President
Nixon's school desegregation policies. However, he
reiterated that Nixon cannot be confident of win-
ning the South in the 1972 election.
Thurmond, in a news conference said, "the
Republicans are much sounder than Hubert Hum-
phrey would have been" if he had been elected
President.
But Thurmond -stressed he will continue to
criticize the administration when he thinks cir-
cumstances warrant it.
"I do not think the administration has the
South locked up," Thurmond said. "I think the
South is going to be more independent, and I hope
it will be."
Last Friday Thurmond implied in a strongly
worded Senate speech that Nixon might lose

Thurmond's support and the support of much of
the South in the 1972 election if the President does
not slown down on school desegregation actions.
Thurmond said yesterday that although he did
not want to name the "liberal and ultra-liberal
advisers" who he earlier blamed with influencing
Nixon's school policies, he admitted that he is "not
happy that Finch has the President's ear."
Thurmond also named Jerris Leonard. assistant
attorney general for civil rights, as someone Thur-
mond could do without.
He also told reporters that "someone friendly
to the President" told Thurmond that a recent
administration decision regarding tax-exempt
status of private schools might have been pioposed
by Nixon's desire to keep the Supreme Court from
imposing tough guidelines affecting the school's
racial makeup.

tension
Although the sheriff missed
this interchange, he was very
much around, all smiles to his
many admirers, as he was
wheeled around by one of his
deputies in a chromium plated
wheelchair.
Harvey frequently rolled into
the courtroom past another of
his men who did a very tho-
rough job of searching all those
See AIR, Page 7

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and
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and
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Tickets: $5.00-$4.00-$2.50
The University Musical Society
Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
OFFICE HOURS: Mon. through Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12
(Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Rackhom Auditorium 1 ' hours before performance .time)

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