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July 18, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-18

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4 * I I * * A

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e Stid$an taih
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

ti

JAMES WECHSLER...
Democrats: A voiceless party

Saturday, July 18, 1970

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76
12Noon Deadline Monday through- Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 18, 1970

News Phone : 764-0552

Fleming i using the
war as a- scapegoat
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN President Robben Flem-
ing should not be so harsh a critic of the failures of
Vietnam war policy. After all, the war provides Fleming
and his colleagues a ready scapegoat for their own fail-
ure to maintain discipline on the campus.
Fleming went at the scapegoat again this week. Tes-
tifying before the President's Commission on Student Un-
rest, he attributed the problems of the campus to "exter-
nal causes" - mainly student opposition to the war.
His statement revealed a lack of knowledge of the
history of campus unrest and of the psychology of that
unrest.
rHE TURMOIL BEGAN at the University of California
at Berkeley, ostensibly over the issues of free speech
and campus political rights and long before the deep U.S.
involvement in Vietnam. Despite conciliatory gestures -
or probably because of the obsequious nature of these
gestures - by the university administration, the so-call-
ed Free Speech Movement swept through Berkeley and
onto other college and university campuses.
It was clear that the leaders of this movement really
did not want to achieve stated goals but rather sought to
assure constant turmoil by escalating demands whenever
it appeared that previous demands were about to be met.
Trouble itself was the main goal.
Not until later was the Vietnam war introduced. It
was introduced not as the essential reason for unrest but
as an effective propaganda vehicle on which the entire
movement could ride.
S. I HAYAKAWA, another witness before the commis-
sion, came nearer the t r u t h with his observation,
"Much of the cause of student unrest is more psychologi-
cal than rooted in events themselves."
A generation containing some bored, pampered and
tyrannical young people has entered the colleges and uni-
versities both as students and faculty members. These
people welcome any action that diverts them from their
lessons.
How much hope can there be for those who have eyes
but refuse to see? President Fleming and many other ed-
ucators who keep blaming the war and other external
causes should look to their own failures as administrators
and to the real character of the movement that threatens
to destroy their campuses.
-THE DETROIT NEWS
July 17
NIGHT EDITOR: DEBRA THAL

IT HAS begun to appear as if
Democratic Chairman Law-
rence O'Brien is destined to serve
as TV stand-in for the next
Democratic Presidential nominee
until the summer of 1972. The
formula is unlikely to provoke any
panic in the Nixon camp. But it
dramatizes the strange condition
of an opposition party that pos-
sesses many real issues, an abund-
ance of talent--and no single,
dominant figure who can be call-
ed its spokesman or whose voice
can be clearly heard in a crowded
room.
The incongruity was dramatiz-
ed the other night when CBS
granted the Democrats 25 minutes
of free time in response to pro-
tests over the Administration's
domination of the air.An uncon-
ventional format was devised for
the reply: the Democrats offered
fragments from Nixon's public ap-
pearances minglednwith docu-
mented critique and sardonic
commentary.
But it is far from clear t h at
they won this oratorical contest
in real political-terms. Their pre-
sentation was entrusted to
O'Brien, obviously to avoid fric-
tion among those who are visual-
ized as contenders for the 1972
nomination. But O'Brien's -gifts
have long been of a behird-the-
scenes operative. His performance
was flat, pedestrian and mirth-
less.
In fact, the excitement of some
of the settings in which Nixon
was shown accentuated the blood-
lessness of O'Brien's rendition.
THUS THE DEMOCRATIC
dilemma in the "equal time" bat-
tle is that they may win many
skirmishes with the networks and
lose the national political argu-
ment. Certainly O'Brien cannot
long serve as the opposition's
mouthpiece. He is primarily a skill-
ed technician who has served
many men-from John F. Ken-
nedy to Lyndon Johnson and from
Robert Kennedy to Hubert
Humphrey-and his lack of pro-
found conviction is reflected in
his adaptability to all these sud-
den changes of command. It is
also transparent on television.
A certain detachment from
ideological quarrels has long been
viewed as the prime requisite of a
political engineer. Whether that
proposition will prevail in t h e
atmosphere of the '70s may be
uncertain. -There is already res-
tiveness about the national com-
mittee's relationship to the Demo-
cratic Policy Council. The emer-
gence of Robert Strauss, a John-
son-Connally protege from Texas,
as committee treasurer is hardly
calculated to inspire the ardor
of liberal Democratic contribu-

tors, especially amid the wounds
created by Ralph Yarborough's
defeat in the Texas primary.
But the real problem extends
beyond the committee. One as-
sumes that no personal vanity or
suppressed visions of TV glory
have induced O'Brien to assume
the star role; he has been long
accustomed to the managerial life.
Yet he seems to be slowly taking
the spotlight because of the dif-
ficulties in designating a party
spokesman for such events.
IT HAS BEEN AMPLY demon-
strated that such Congressional
leaders as MikerMansfield Iand
Carl Albert will break no Nielsen
rating records. In traditional cir-
cumstances Hubert Humphrey, as
the last Presidential candidate,
would have a prior claim. Dur-
ing most of the Eisenhower years,
it was generally recognized that
Adlai Stevenson was the voice of
the opposition - and an elo-
quent, gracious, witty one.
But Humphrey's commitment to
the Vietnam war in the Johnson
era and his alienation from many
new Democratic voters have left
him far too vulnerable to assert
a position of uncontested leader-
ship. There remain the many arti-
culate-Senators - among them
George McGovern, Ed Muskie, Ted
Kennedy, Harold Hughes, F r e d
Harris and (when he chooses to
speak) Eugene McCarthy. Of all
of them, Kennedy might by now
have almost moved front and
center, but Chappaquiddick chan-
ged the timetables.

Surely any one of them would
-have performed O'Brien's TV act
with greater success if varying
distinction. But who would have
agreed on whom without seeming
to yield some precedence in the
1972 sweepstakes? While they
might be persuaded to draw lots
for rotating roles, the available
time is limited and there might be
many petty disputes. Meanwhile,
John Lindsay, who could probably
offer the most appealing TV re-
buttals to Nixon's foreign a n d
domestic policies, is disqualified
from equal time appearances for
the present by his non-member-
ship in the opposition party.
IN THESE LEADERLESS hours
the Democrats might be will-ad-
vised to modify their stress on
equal time and exert larger pres-
sure for the revival and expan-
sion of that old-fashioned institu-
tion known as direct debate. The
networks might clear the air by
initiating major moves in t h a t
direction. As suggested here be-
fore, these need not be restricted
to elected officials. A series of
prime-time confrontations be-
tween Ken Galbraith and Henry
Kissinger ,for example, might be
more illuminating than some of
the equal time exercises now be-
ing devised. As a super-special,
Spiro Agnew might be lured into
the ring with J. W. Fulbright.
Other intriguing match-ups could
be quickly conceived once the
show got on the road.
©New York Post

FOR RENT
VM TABLE-MODEL -Stereo, mahagony
cabinet. Olivetti portable typewriter
with case. Each $25. Call 764-0510
mornings, or 662-0348 evenings. BD53
APART. FOR RENT on Hill St. for 1
person, furnished and all utilities
paid except phone. Call NO 8-9538
until 8 p.m. 29Ctc
APTS. LOCATOR, $12.50, Summer and
Fall, on and off-campus. 1217 S.U.
761-7764. 22C48
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 63-
6448. l5Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SUMMEnd & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. laCte
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
mo. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27tc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets. storage and parking.
Call on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Ctc
SANS SOUCI APTS.
Luxury Apartments
Near Stadium
Air conditioned
Adequate Parking
Dishwasher
Near Campus Bus Stop
4-Men Apt. $240
5-Men Apt. $280
Some 2-men apt. left also
Call 662-2952
31Ct
NEAR MDICAL CENTER
1035 Walls St.-Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852 or 665-7273. llCtc
1 OR 2 NEEDED to take over lease for
Sept,-May. Beautiful bi-level. Call
769-7467 after 5. 25C45
NEWLY Panelled single rooms for men,
3 blocks from Engin. Arch. Available
now. 663-5930. 26C45
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
FURNISHED-FALL RENTAL
1 and 2 Bedroom Apts.
1111 S. State
1506 Packard
1-864-3852, 353-7389 or
761-2366 after 5.
12Ctc
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
FOR FALL-Modern 2 bdrm. furnished,
A/C apt. In remodeled old house, 2
blks. from Law School. $290/mo. All
utilities included. NO 2-2466. 28C48
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS ?
VISIT
t f US
FOR.
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims ......6.50
Button-Fly.......6.50
Traditional .,.... 6.98
Bells . ......... 7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS.... ...2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's .. 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's...- 6.98
Nuvo's ...8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!

Sam Store
122 E. Washington

FOR RENT
CHOICE APTS.
For Fall. 2, 3,and 4 man, close to
campus. 769-2800. Ann -Arbor Trust
Co., Property Management Dept., 100
S. Main. 30Ctc
GIRL WANTED to share large apt. on
campus. $75/mo. Call 665-3265 or 482-
9428. 32C51
MEALS, LAUNDRY, FRIENDSHIP, TV
at Osterweil Peoples Co-op, $52/mo.
761-6084.
OSTERWEIL PEOPLES CO-OP
21C48
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Real1ty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
loCtc
SCAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600

SUMMER SUBLET

SUB. IMMED., thru Aug. 20. 1 bdrm.
apt., very close to campus, double
bed. $100/mo. or best offer; poss. fall
option. Call Ellen, anytime Sat. 769-
3594. 15U48
GIRL NEEDED for 5-man apt. Now
thru Aug. 25. $40. 663-6621 anytime.
16U50
SUMMER SUBLET-1 bdrm., available
now, close to campus. 769-7555. 14U51
1 BDRM. APT., 2-man for Aug. Third
and Madison. 665-6985 after 6. 36U49
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted - Own
room, near law quad. $45 rent. Call
663-6828. 38UD50
MOD. EFF. for Aug. 5 min. from UGLI.
Negotiable, swiniming pool. Call 663-
7846 after 5, keep trying. 10U46
TRANSPORTATION
I NEED RIDE to N.Y.C. or closest point
east. Leaving week of July 20. Will
share costs, driving. Call 761-9462
after 5. 47G49
I NEED A RIDE TO BOSTON around
July 20. Will share driving, expenses.
Call Vicky, 665-4830. GD52
WANT RIDE to N,YC. Aug. 2, p.m.,
Dearborn campus faculty. 271-2300,
ext. 342. 29G50
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
SCHWINN Varsity Bicycle, 3-speed. Ex.
cond. Call 761-7793 after 6 p.m. 33Z49
'63 R-60.B.M.W. $750. 769-0947. 34Z48
'69 SUZUKI 200 -cc, $400 or reasonable
offer. Not a scratch, must sell. 662-
7706. 34Z52
BSA 441 cc, 1968. 3500 miles, helmets,
ins. 769-1123. 35Z51
1965 HONDA 160, excellent condition,
extras. 761-7594 after 6 or weekends.
36248
1948 INJDIAN, 500cc, twin, rigid frame,
springer forks. original Indian saddle
bags. $300 or best offer. 761-0745. ZD53
'67 BSA Hornet 650. Call Larry Toot,
663-7850. 32Z48
HONDA REPAIRS, TUNE-UPS, OVER-
HAULS.dReasonably done, guaran-
teed, 1 day service, 665-5479. 25251
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71
PHOTO SUPPLIES
NIKKORMAT FTN, 4 lenses,24mmn
50mm., 125mm., 600mm. $550. 426-
8969. 30D48!
COMPLETE DARKROOM set-up, in-
cludes Omega B22 enlarger. $200. 426-
8969. 22D50
AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE
Everything Photographic
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes

LINES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1.55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCH ES
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90

2 days
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4.95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35

3 days
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55

UNCONTRACTED (

A
1
3

Additional costs per day after six c
Ads that ore 1A, 21, 31/2, et
average of the lower and highe

3s8tc

USED CARS

FOR SALE-Yellow TR-6, 12,000 miles,
one owner, perfect condition. 769-
2404. 22N52
'62 V.W. CAMPER-New engine, Exc.
running cond. Radial tires. 434-1487,
23N50
VW Squareback, blue, 1967, FM, $1400.
665-7057. ,.35N50
PORSCHE ,'59, 356 A type convertible,
body excellent, eventually will need
engine work. Best offer over $500.
Call 662-2576, 9-6. 32N49
vW SQUAREBACK, 1966, black with
red interior, fine cond., best offer.
761-3419. 33N49
ALPINE 1725, 1966, radials, many ex-
tras, excellent condition. $1050. 663-
7042. 1 owner, after five. 19N48
'64 FORD Fairlane 500 in ex. cond. Best
offer. Call Brian at 662-5955 or 764-
0410. 21N48

FOR SALE
GARAGE SALE-Sat. morning only. 611
Peninsula Court. 769-7161. 40B48
FOR SALE-Small 2 cu. ft. refrigerator,
Sony TC-250 tape deck. Also I need
roommates for fall (or room). Call
Jeff, 663-8440. 39B48
REMINGTON Typewriter, good cond.,
$15; small paper cutter, $5. 761-0135.
BD49
RECEIVER AM-FM stereo, $75; mono-
amplifier, $15. Call1665-2111 after four.
19Btc
BUSINESS SERVICES
LOOKING for baby-sitting, house
cleaning, yard work jobs. Call Louise,
665-6807. 29J50
YOUNG WOMAN, six years university
teaching and editing experience, lit-
erature M.A., plus Ph.D. hours, would
like free-lance editing or writing.
Excellent references. Call 662-0348
evenings; 764-0510 mornings, JD53
EXPERIENCED public stenographer
wants to do typing in her home:
manuscripts, thesis, business reports.
Call Barbara,*761-0104. 30J50
COUPLE WISHES house-sitting spot
for fall semester. Excellent refer-
ences and experience. Call 663-4323.
28J48
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W, Stadium Blvd.

:
,
,
i
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i
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balancing teacups
How to be a woman? Ask Silva Thins
nadjice cohodac

p.5

to

SOMETHING OUGHT to be done to
the American Tobacco Company for
hiring Batton, Barton, Durstine and Os-
borne to do their Silva Thin ads. And
then something ought to be done to
BBD&O, as they call it on Madison Ave.,
before it creates any more baddies.
"Cigarettes are like women," BBD&O
tells us. "The best kind are thin and
rich."
This is perplexing and disgruntling.
Perplexing because it took two days
of long distance calls to New York to
find out who would accept blame for
this ad. And disgruntling just because
of what the ad says.
THE AMERICAN TOBACCO Company
receptionist was quite helpful Thursday
when she told me that BBD&O was the
Silva' Thin agency. First she had
thought the ad was done by Norman,
Craig and Kummel-NCK in the ad
world--but double checking revealed
BBD&O as the culprit.
So, I got BBD&O's number in New
York and Detroit and tried the Detroit
number first because it's closer and
consequently cheaper. Detroit, however,

said that Silva Thin was not their ac-
count but did I want to know about
Tareyton's which is?
I didn't and instead went right to the
top and called New York.
The New York office likewise told me
that "there must have been some mix-
up." BBD&O does not do Silva Thin
commercials, and it probably is NCK
that I want.
By this time it was too late to try
NCK, so yesterday morning I gave them
a try and, lo and behold, they told me,
it was BBD&O who is, in truth, the
creator of the notorious commercial.
Completing my fourth call to New
York, I waited anxiously to speak with
the top account man to clarify once
and for all who was the mastermind be-
hind the ad.
Well, he wasn't in, but his secretary
did admit that BBD&O was the right
place for the information I wanted. She
told me the ad-man would call me back.
He didn't, so that's that.
WHY THE FUSS over the commer-
cial? It's simple--the ad makes a sweep-

ing value judgment upon a Hollywood,
fairyland stereotype for women that just
isn't so. This thin, rich woman is best,
they say, best in terms of appealing to
men because she is what they all want.
Apparently, after picking up a Silva
Thin a woman, is supposed to feel -thin
and rich and attractive even though
she knows she's the same as she was
five minutes ago only now she's holding
a cigarette.
And men as soon as they smoke their
Silva Thins, presumably feel as though
they are with that thin, rich woman
they're supposed to adore. It follows
here that if one isn't a thin, rich women,
then one is not going to find a man
because all men like the same kind of
woman.
Isn't this somewhat ridiculous? Does
every man'really like thin, rich women?
How does one know if this type is Best?
Best for whom? For what? Are mon-
ey and-the shape of one's body the only
things that matter and is an abundance
of the former and a moderate amount
of the latter the best combination?
There are, of course, no -absolute an-

swers to these questions because there
are no universal criteria for one sex at-
tracting the other. There may be many-
men who prefer thin, wealthy women
and probably just as many who like.
them chunkier and don't care about
their financial status.
WHAT IS SO disgruntling is t h a t
BBD&O apparently doesn't take this
into account, but advertises instead
through a snappy but.falacious assum-
ption. Their commercials are of t h e
same ilk as the Charles Atlas aren't-
you-sorry-you're-a-99-lb.-weakling ads.
These imply that if you're not a mus-.
clebound giant no woman would be in-
terested in you.
Again, this may be true for some wo-
men, but certainly not for all of them.
And to imply that millions of people are
inferior or deficient because they fail to
conform to certain stereo types is most
unfortunate and repugant.
Perhaps BBD&O could try this slo-
gan some time: "Cigarette ads are like
garbage. The best kind are dumped and
ditched."

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRSj
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and
used. Lessons, repairs. 209 S. State.
665-8001. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. X
RADIO, TV, Hi-fi, car repair. House
calls. Very reasonable-even CHEAP!
769-6250. XD51
GARRARD SL65 automatic turntable
with base and dust cover. Shure M93E
cartridge. $60 or best offer. Call 761-
5201. XD48
HELP WANTED w
TEACHERS, counselors, specialists -
Fall openings, many out of state.
Cline Teachers Agency, Box 607, East
Lansing, Mich. 48823. 16H53
MALE SUBJECTS for psych experiment,
11,$-2 hrs., $3. Call 764-0309 wk. days
or 662-4970 eves. and wk. ends. 15H49
Under 30
Temporary Work
Sales position open
Guaranteed $125/wk.
Travel in the Midwest
Write-On Publications
761'-6199
14_H48
MATURE student or couple wanted to
take care of professor's infant and 3
yr. old Aug. 13-15 and the infant
Aug. 29-Sept. 5. 761-8838. 13H50
LOOKING FOR A JOB?
Talented or experienced or interested
in a particular field? ,Try placing a
Michigan 'Daily "BUSINESS SERV-
ICES" or "PERSONAL" ad-and help
a job find YOU. HDtc
GOLDsmith's services desired. Call 769-
6852. Keep trying. HD48
HELP WANTED for Mike Stillwagon, 30
yr. 'old former, poverty lawyer now
running for Congress. Straight"or
freak - anybody welcome. Call 769-
3288 or drop in 2004 Traver Rd. 10H53
TIME'S UP for the Nixon-Agnew-Mil-
liken ticket. Time for a change in
Lansing.
LEVIN FOR GOVERNOR-DEMOCRAT
663-5972, 482-2396, 663-6932
-11H4

Century Camera
(At our new location)
4254 N. Woodward, Royal Oak
Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd.
LI 9-6355
Take 1-94 to Southfield Expr. North to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward and North
(Michigan Bank, Security and Diner
Charges accepted)
S IDt
ROOMMATES WANTED
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted, 4-man
apt. 764-7622 or 764-7623. 18Y50
2 MALES NEEDED for 4-man, fall apt.,
bi-level. Has everything, ex. location.
Call Jon in Det., 862-9040. 19Y49
2 FEMALE Roommates wanted, 4-man
apart. Call 761-3198 after 6. 15Y49
THIRD GIRL needed--2 bdrm. house,
for3fal. 1020 Oakland, No. 3. Call NO
X.~367. 16Y49
WANTED TO RENT
2 BDRM, unit in house near campus
w/kitchen, bath. 663-5967 or 761-7985
-for fall. 22L52
1-MAN APT., room with kitchen. Priv.,
about $100/mo.. Call 761-8627. 31L50E
3 Bedroom House
Wanted by 4-5 grad students for fall.
Please call 761-5678 or 761-7839. 20149
WANTED TO BUY
CAR WANTED-4 or 8 cylinder low
horsepower), 1967 or older, good con-
dition, economical. 761-0047. 30K
PETS AND SUPPLIES
FREE KITTENS AND CATS4
all varieties
Call 665-4830
TD52

26Pt r

MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
Jtc
LOST AND FOUND

i
i
t
I
z

LOST-Well loved solid grey kitten,
White-Arch Sts. area. Contact 662-
3295 or after 6, 668-7016. ask for Liz.
27A50
LOST-13-week-old female puppy, part
labradour and shepherd. Black with
brown and white markings. 514 S.'
Forest, Apt. 3E. 662-7524. 26A56
FOUND-Male black puppy, short hair,
floppy ears, white markings on chest.
Call Barbara, 663-3005 after 5. AD48
LOST-4 mo. old orange male kitty.
Near 5th and Madison. Please call
761-1664. 24A49
LOST-3 mo old collie puppy, liYht
brown and white, female, answfiers to
"Gru." Please r<11 761-6742. 25A49;
PERSONAL
WEKLY and WEEKEND Encounter
Groups. Emnotional~ re-education and
Interpersonal awareness. Call 663-
7616. 15F64
THE ONLY PLACE in Ann Arbor to
buy her diamond engagement ring.
CHECK IT.
AUSTIN DIAMOND
1209 S. University 663-7151

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