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July 17, 1970 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-17

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Page Eight

Friday, July 17, 1970

0'.

9

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Daliy Classifieds

ALL-STARS RESUME PRACTICE

ROOMMATES WANTED
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted, 4-man
apt. 764-7622 or 764-7623. 18Y50
2 MALES NEEDED for 4-man, fall apt.,
bi-level. Has everything, ex. location.
Call Jon in Det., 862-9040. 19Y49
2 FEMALE Roommates wanted, 4-man
apart. Call 761-3198 after 6. 15Y49
THIRD GIRL needed-2 bdrm. house.
for fall 1020 Oakland, No. 3. Call NO
8-8367. 16Y49
BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED public stenographer
wants to do typing In her home:
manuscripts, thesis, business reports.
Call Barbara, 761-0104. 30J50
COUPLE WISHES house-sitting spot
for fall semester. Excellent refer-
ences and experience. Call 663-4323.
28J48
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric, Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERI-ENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
s ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Pc
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Ti hesis Service
Papers
Dissertations
General office and Secretaral Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
Jtc
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Small 2 cu. ft. refrigerator,
Sony TC-250 tape deck. Also I need
roommates for fall (or room). Call
Jeff, 663-8440. 39B48
REMINGTON Typewriter, good cond.,
$15; smalI paper cutter, $5. 761-0135,
BD49
RECEIVER AM-FM stereo, $75; mono-
amplifier, $15. Call 665-2111 after four.
19Btc
BARBELLS, weights, used LP's, 8 mm
Movie Editor. Call 761-0372. 20B47
BOX SPRINGS and mattress. CHEAP.
1 yr. old, call Joe, 426-3440. 1447
WANTED TO RENT
1-MAN APT., room with kitchen. Priv.,
about $100/mo. Call 761-8627. 31L50
DO YOU NEED someone to fill your
funky old house, near campus for the
fall? I want to. Please call or phone
Stan. 761-9766. 21L47
3 Bedroom House
Wanted by 4-5 grad students for fall.
Please call 761-5678 or 761-7839. 20L49
WANTED: Furnished Apt., 1 or 2 bed-
rooms, A/C, Univ. Prof. attending
ISR 7/28-8/21. Write Dr. Cohen, C/O
Lucksen, 1176 Lydig Ave., Bx., N.Y.
10461. 19L47
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED L EVIS ?
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims ...... 6.50
Button-Fly ....... 6.50
Traditional ......6.98
Bells ............7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS. .. . 2.49
MORE LFVI'S
"White" Levi's .. . 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"

Levi's ....6.98
Nuvo's ...........8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sams Store
122 E. Washington

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS. REPAIRS-
RADIO, TV, Hi-fi, car repair,^House
calls. Very reasonable--even CHEAP!
769-6250. XD51
"NEW 15" loudspeakers $20 ea. or 6
for $90. New and used ARB sound sys-
tenm equipment and parts. 6784) Jack-
son Rd. 13X47
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and
used. Lessons, repars. 209 S. State.
665-8001. 10 a2m.-7 p.m. X
GARRARD SL65 automatic turntable
with base anddust cover. Shure M93E
cartridge. $60 or best offer. Call 761-
5201 XD48
LOST AND FOUND
LOST- 13-week-old female puppy, part
labradour and shepherd. Black with
brown and white markings. 514 S.
Forest, Apt. 3E. 662-7524. 26A56
FOUND-Male black puppy, short hair,
floppy ears, white markings on chest.
Call Barbara, 663-3005 after 5. AD48
LOST-4 mo. old orange male kitty.
Near 5th and Madison. Please call
761-1664. 24A49
FOUND-Woman's glasses, Geddes and
Forest, Friday evening. 764-4536, ask
for Allan, AD47
LOST-3 mo. old collie puppy, light
brown and white, female, answers to
"Gr." Please call 761-6742. 25A49
FOUND-Pair of wire rim glasses on
S. Univ. Call 769-0142 or 764-8557, ask
for David. AD47
PETS AND SUPPLIES
FREE KITTENS AND CATS
all varieties
Call 665-4830
TD21
PERSONAL
COME! FREE U Crafts Fair! Join
courses, buy crafts, enjoy good music.
Friday and Saturday, on the Diag
10F48
SUN. SPECIAL Bowling, 3 games $1,
M-Union from 3 p.m. - 11F48
WHAT ARE you doing to end the war?
Bruce Neal is running for Congress.
Will you help him? Call 971-8155.
14F49
FOR SALE - Diamond Engagement
Ring. EDUCATION at its best. Austin
Diamond, 1209 S. University. 663-7151.
Ftc
SUN. 1-6 P.M. BILLIARDS $1/hr.
TABLE TENNIS 50c/hr. UNION. 12F48
SANDER LEVIN
If you're a leader, why did you let a
majority of Democratic Senators
vote against abortion reform in Mich-
igan while Governor Milliken got the
Republican senators to vote for re-
form?
If deeds really speak louder than
words, Mr. Levin, they should call
you 'Silent Sander"
MICHIGAN for MILLIKEN
Call Donna at 769-0980, or
John at 665-3140
13F49
AMANDA FENWICK'S fabulous sale,
leather shirts, tops, coats, $10-$25.
522 E. William. 24F48
COMING - Jimmy Caras, Billiards
champion, M Union, 9-16-70. 25F47
DON'T be a wall flower-be a WILD
flower with fashions from WILD-
FLOWER-the unique boutique, 516
E. William (above the Campus Bike
and Toy Shop). 26F48
WE'RE taking root and growing -
WILDFLOWER, the unique boutique.
516 E. William (above the Campus
Bike and Toy Shop). 28F48
LEARN TO FLY the summer skies, The
Flying Club, unbelievably cheap. 665-
3990 or 769-7558 for details. 9F49
NOTICE TO MICHIGAN DAILY BOX
HOLDERS, MAIL IS IN THE FOL-
LOWING BOXES: 73, 50. FD
GOVERNOR MILLIKEN
How can you join in partnership with
Spiro Agnew at Cobo Hall to raise
more than, $500,000 to help your cam-
paign? The truth is, Governor Milliken,
you can't play both sides.
When you take a man's money, Gov-
ernor Milliken, you're on his team,
TIME FOR A CHANGE!
LEVIN FOR GOVERNOR-DEMOCRAT
Phone 663-5972, 482-2396, 663-6932
6F48
TIME'S UP for the Agnew-Griffin-Mil-
liken ticket. Time for a Change in
Michigan.
SANDER LEVIN-DEMOCRAT
FOR GOVERNOR
Phone 663-5972, 482-2396, 663-6932
5F48

PAINTING - Student desires painting
jobs, inside and outside. Four years
experience. Call 662-4736. FD
FOUND-Striped calico kitten, about
4-5 months old. 761-3884. ADO8
FOUND-Small brown and black beagle
in School of Natural Resources. 763-
0297. AD47
FOUND - Black shaggy haired puppy
with colar. 665-7962. AD47

NFLPA ah
NEW YORK W)-A difference of $7.8 million
in pension benefits emerged yesterday as the
major stumbling block toward a settlement be-
tween National Football League players and own-
ers after player's sources revealed their side of
the issues.
While the issues were being made known, the
threat to the College All-Star Game in Chicago
July 31 lessened when the All-Stars decided to
resume organized practice yesterday in Evanston,
Ill.
The decision was announced in Chicago by
Steve Tannen of the All-Stars and in New York
by John Mackey, president of the Players Associa-
tion.
The owners have offered $18 million in pen-
sion and insurance benefits for four years, an
average of $4.5 million per year, while the players
are asking for $25.8 million, or $6.45 million per
year, a source close to the players told the Asso-
ciated Press. The players were getting $2.8 million
each year during the two-year pact which ex-
pired, making the $18 million figure an increase
of about 53 per cent.
The player's source was answering an earlier
Associated Press story quoting club sources as
saying the owners were making an $18 million
offer, but that the players had countered with a
$29 million "must-take-all" demand.
"The $29 million figure never came into the
discussions," the player's source said. "It is a piece
of incorrect arithmetic. They (the owners) must
Tigerss
By The Associated Press '
CH I C AGO - The Detroit M
Tigers pounded 18 hits, includ
ing four homers, and whipped AMERIC
the Chicago White Sox 11-6 lastE
night in a free-swinging affair.
*Baltimore 5
Mickey Stanley hit a home Detroit 4
run to trigger a five-run third New York 4
inning that chased loser Jerry Boston C
Washington 4
Janeski, 7-9, after Bill Melton's Cleveland
15th homer had given ChicagoW
a 1-0 lead in the second. But Minnesota 5
California
Les Cain, whose only two losses Oakland
this season have been at White Kansas City 3
Sox expenses, couldn't go the Milwaukee 3
necessary five innings, and Fred Chicago 3i
Scherman, 3-1, the third of four YesKa
Tigers pitchers, got the victory. Detroit 11, Chica
Dick McAuliffe, N o r m Cash California 3, Was
and Bill Freehan also homered Oakland 8, New
for the Tigers. New York 4, Oakl
Baltimore 5, Min
* * * Boston 6, Mlwau
Pirates blow debut Detroit at Chiaa
Cleveland at Kan
PITTSBURGH - Tony Perez Minnesota at Bal
slammed a two-run homer and California at Wa
Oakland at New
scored on Lee May's ninth-in- Milwaukee at Bo
ning single, sparking the Cin-
cinnati Reds to a 3-2 victory
over the Pittsburgh Pirates last D arl
night.
The loss marred the Pirates'
debut in their new Three Rivers
Stadium. /l u
A crowd of 48,846, largest ever
to see a baseball game in Pitts- BOSTON(P
burgh, saw Perez single off
Dock Ellis, 9-7, with one out in Joe Cronin for
the ninth. Johnny Bench then yesterday in te
walked and May followed with Indians and Joh
his game-winning hit. The umpire
Perez' 30th homer scored for being "never
starter Gary Nolan,. who had
walked to lead off the fifth in- In their un
ning league umpire f
The Pirates got a run in the contend that th
first on Richie Hebner's single collective barga
and Al Oliver's double. They The testimo
tied it in the sixth on Wlie tim
Stargell's 17th homer.
S * * * -Flaherty, th
Twins trounced worked the 1966
on the crew.
BALTIMORE - Andy Etche- "Both were
barren drove in two Baltimore the battlefield."
runs and made three key defen-
sive plays as the Orioles defeat- . Dark told e
ed the mistake-prone Minnesota ferent opinion o
Twins 5-1 last night. tine "had the c
Etchebarren rapped a two-run they handled th

double in the sixth off reliever Most of Da
Dick Woodson after Boog Powell former Clevelan
opened the inning with his 24th
homer off loser Tom Hall, 5-3. 26 and July 27, 1
* * * Dark said h
was justified, "b
ejection the seco
HOUSTON - The Houston fied." But Salern
Astros scored a pair of unearned Johnson ma
runs and Jim Ray bailed Don the game began
Wilson out of a ninth-inning
jam for a 2-1 victory over the Johnson was thn
Chicago Cubs last night, had no way of kn

rs demands-
be adding together everything. Both the $18 mil-
lion and the $25.8 million figures relate only to
pension and insurance benefits."
However, the players are asking for increased
shares in post-season games, including the Super
Bowl, and these increases possibly could be the
difference between $25.8 million and $29 million.
The player's source said the owners also made
two qualifications to their figure-that payments
to players on losing teams in divisional playoff
games be eliminated, and that players give up
their financial rights for the use of their names,
faces or uniforms icommercial enterprises. This
right was granted them during 1968 negotiations,
The player's source said the $18-million figure
would cost each club about $40,000 a year, while
the $25.8 figure would be about $140,000 a year.
He pointed out that the owners have negotiat-
ed a television contract of about $40 million, an
increase of about $13 million from the previous
one.
Answering owners' fears that television revenue
and attendance might not remain at its present
level, he said the players were willing to reduce
their demands accordingly should that happen.
While the pension issue was clear enough, the
issue involving Commissioner ,Pete Rozelle's pow-
ers remained muddled. The players say it has
been resolved by their agreeing to make Rozelle
the final arbitrator on any non-injury grievance.
Club sources, however, said the players still want
an outside arbitrator to rule on general griev-
ances filed by players.

- cl-

Sfr~ilian

1Wt

Vol. LXXX, No. 47-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Friday, July 17, 1970 Ten Cent

REGENTS

SGCA

SACUA

HAGGLE

o)SS

dispute

oc

Sox

ajor League Standings

con tir,
The Regents,
the Senate Advisc
(SACUA) once m
organization of
(OSS) yesterday.
The Regents a
tion again when
The disagreem
ing centered arotu
in the OSS. SACi
it reside in a po:
and faculty. Som
president for stud
ity while the pol
president.
Most of yeste
with an SGC pro
establishment of
and a policy boat
be defined, howev
at a later date.
"We are willing
I think it is only
your way," said S
But several R
to first define wh
seemed to believe
president.
Yesterday's dis
of a four-year cc
Regents and SGC
a year over the q
OSS policy board
which are binding
After the OSS
brief presentatiom
The Gay LiberF
nature and purpo.
to the University,
the Union and Pr
to allow it to hold
sexuality at the U
A group of gra
the Status of Won
spoke next. Spoke
a letter to the F
advocacy of the se
position of vice pre
She clarified ti'
not wish to be gu
but to our know
open."
,The final spea
dinner at the Dea
vens from the M
Fund Board. She
pects of how the m
Last month a
Academic Affairs
of MLK funds for
The Regents m
Item on the agend
1970-1971 budget a

AN LEAGUE
East

NATIONAL LEAGUE

W L
55 33
48 38
47 40
45 41
40 49
39 48
West

Pet.
.627
.558
.540
.523
.449
.448

GB
6
7% 4
9
15%
15x ~
4
9
23/
26?/
26x!

Pittsburgh
New York
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
Atlanta
San Francisco
Houston
San Diego

East
W L
50 4'
47 39
43 43
39 48
36 49
37 5
West
63 26
51 35
43 4,
41 44
37 5
36 54

0
9
3
18
9
1
5
14
14
i4

Pet.
.555
.547
.500
.447
.424
.420
.711
.593
.494
.482
.420
.400

GB
1
5
9V,
11
12
10!
19
20
25
27

54 29 .653
52 35 .599
48 41 .539
33 53 .382
32 58 .356
31 59 .342
ay's Results
Isas City 0
tgo 6
hington 2
York 2, 1st
and 1, 2nd
rnesota 1
kee 5, 10 inn.
's Games
sas City-
timore
shington
York
ston

Yesterday's Results
Houston 2, Chicago 2
New York at Los Angeles, inc.
Philadelphia at San Diego, inc.
Atlanta 7, St. Louis 3
Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh 2
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
New York at Los Angeles
Philadelphia at San Diego
Montreal at San Francisco
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
Atlanta at St. Louis
Chicago at Houston

k Flaherty testify
p ort of fired umps
P)-Two umpires fired by American League President
alleged incompetence were rated highly competent
stimony by Alvin Dark, manager of the Cleveland
n Flaherty, a league umpire since 1953.x
s, Al Salerno and Bill Valentine, were fired in 1968
at any one time competent," according to the league.
fair labor practice suit, however,- Salerno, a major
or seven years, and Valentine, a veteran of six years
ey were fired because they were trying to organize a
ining unit for American League umpires.
ny came at a hearing before a National Labor Rela-
miner.
he chief of an umpire crew, testified that Valentine
season on his crew and Salerno worked "off and on"
very good umpires. They more than held their own on
3aminer David Davidson that "every man has a dif-
f what an umpire should do," but Salerno and Valen-
ourage to do what they thought was right . . . and
e ball game.'
rk's testimony centered on the ejection by Salerno
d outfielder-Lou Johnson during games played July
968.
.e thought Johnson's ouster during the July 26 game
but as manager In the dugout, I thought Johnson's
ond day" before the game had begun, "was unjusti-
nmo wasn't in the dugout before the game."
de a joking remark and gesture to Salerno just before
and "since everyone in the dugout was laughing,"
rown out, Dark said. He added, however, that Salerno
rowing that Johnson was joking.

The streets
belong to
the merchants
A father and son team (above)
work together to create miniature'
cars to sell at the Street Art Fair
on South University. Meanwhile
on State Street, a passerby peruses
the bargains during Bargain Days
hoping to find a good buy. And
the junction of North University
and State (below) presents the
entire array of merchants and
consumers doing their economic
thing.
-Photos by Richard Lee

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