100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 11, 1970 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


At..

4

;Is

* g I 4 1 4 If

-0

4

0

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

igers,

Cain

clip

Orioles,

4-2

trl tg tn

43 tA

By The Associated Press
DETROITsLes Cain singled in the
decisive runs and won his eighth straight
game with relief help as the Detroit
Tigers edged Baltimore 4-2 last night and
closed in on the first place Orioles ..
Cain was masterful until the seventh
inning, striking out nine, including Paul
Blair and Frank Robinson three con-
secutive times each. He allowed only one
hit through the first six innings.
The 22-year-old southpaw, top per-
centage pitcher in the league with a 9-2
record, also poked a two-run single in the
fourth that gave second-place Detroit a
decisive 3-0 lead to help pull them within
five games of Baltimore in the American
League East.
Don Wert homered in the second off
Jim Palmer, 12-6 to start the Tigers scor-
ing. Palmer, who is Baltimore manager
Earl Weaver's probable starter for the All-
Star game Tuesday, allowed three runs
on nine hits before being taken out for a
pinch-hitter in the seventh.
With one out Cain gave up singles to

Tony Jacklin blasts from the sand at the second.
Trevinostill tops

British

Ope

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland (MP-Lee Tre-
vino, the talkative Texan from El Paso,
lenghtened his lead to two strokes yesterday
after 54 holes of the British Open Golf
Championship by carefully coasting through
the third round in par 72 for a total of 208.
Remaining eight under par for play over
the 6,951-yard, par 72 Old Course, Trevino
went out in 36 and then came home in 36
with a birdie three on No. 18 for his two-
stroke lead over a trio of challengers-coun-
trymen Jack Nicklaus of Columbus, Ohio and
Doug Sanders of Houston, Tex. and Britain's
Tony Jacklin.
Nicklaus, who started the day just one
stroke back, lost an opportunity to keep
Trevino's lead from growing when he parred
the last two holes for a 73 and his 210. He
just missed getting a birdie on 18 that would

have 'held Trevino's margin at one stroke.
Sanders moved six under par with a 71,
coming home in 34 with four threes on the
back nine for his 210. Sanders, who was
three strokes beak starting out, therefore
cut one off Trevino's edge over him going
into Saturday's final round.
Jacklin, who like Nicklaus started out one
stroke back, fell two behind by shooting a
one-over 73 for his 210.
While Nicklaus and Sanders remained
closely in the chase against their fellow
American, Arnold Palmer of Latrobe, Pa.,
fell back with a four-over-par 76 that left
him at 216.
Jacklin dropped shots at the 10th and
13th holes and went to only five under par
while Trevino coasted along in par figures,

three shots in front of the defending c
pion. At that point Nicklaus stormed
with a great 18-foot birdie putt for a
at the 16th and took second slot, six1
par.
Trevino three-putted the 16th hole,
ping a shot, and stood at seven under
only one stroke ahead of the field. Ja
playing with him stood at five under
They parred the 17th hole in four
came to the 18th where thousands of
bound golf fans waited to see both
with birdies.
The finish of the titans shook the
blase of golf fans. Jacklin hit a wedg
feet from the hole. Trevino used aX
from the fairways and was 20 feet pa
stick. He knocked the ball in for his
three and Jacklin then tapped his in.

Dave Johnson and Andy Etchebarren,
plus a walk to Bobby Grich to load the
bases in the seventh. Pinch-hitter Curt
Moton knocked in a run on a fielder's
choice and Don Buford followed with an
RBI single to narrow the score to 3-2
and send Cain to the showers. Tom Tim-
merman got out of the jam and stopped
the Orioles cold in the final two innings.
Atlanta extended Cincinnati's losing
streak to three, the Reds' longest of the
year, by outslugging The Machine 11-9 in
the first of two, but the Reds ended their
mild skid in the nightcap with a 3-1 vic-
tory.
Orlando Cepeda hit two homers in the
opener for the Braves, and Clete Boyer
added another to pace the Atlanta at-
tack. In the nightcap, Tony Cloninger and
Clay Carroll combined to silence the
Brave bats. The big blow for the Reds
came in the ninth when reserve catcher
Pat Corrales hit a two-run homer that
bounced off Henry Aaron's glove over the
right-field fence.
Meanwhile, the Montreal Ex-
pos ended the Mets longest win-
~ ning streak of the year at seven
with a 9-7 victory, as rookie
Carl Morton racked up his third
victory over New York. Coco
ham- Laboy drove four runs with two
back doubles and a single to pace the
three Expo attack,
under Pittsburgh moved back to
within one-half game of the
drop- Mets as they ended Bob Gibson's
rpr ten-game winning streak with a
' pal', 6-2 decision over the Cardinals.
ckin' The game was tied 2-2 going in-
to the ninth, but Al Oliver open-
s and ed the frame with a homer, and
spell- reliever Dave Giusti later strok-
finish ed a two-run single to seal the
Cards' fate.
most The Cubs continued to rise
e two like the Phoenix from the ashes,
putter winning their fifth game in the
st the last six 2-0 over Philadelphia.
birdie Fergie Jenkins evened his record
at 10-10 by scattering five hits,
and Ron Santo doubled in Jim
Hickman and then scored on a
single by John Callison to ac-
count for the Cubs' scoring.
San Francisco held off a late
Houston rally to beat the Astros,
8-5. The Giants battered four
Houston hurlers for 16 hits.
Inthe America League,
Frank Howard's 24th homer
gave Washington a 2-1 victory
over New York, Carl Yastrzems-
ki hit number 21 as Boston beat
Cleveland 7-1, and Ed Kirk-
patrick socked homers in each
H game as Kansas City swept Chi-
cago, 8-6 and 2-0.

U.S. TO,
SCHOOL

DISCRI,

I

Zorba the
fed-up Greek
-
Mikis Theodorakis, 44-year-old
Greek composer, pauses during a
news conference yesterday afteri
announcing his resignation as a
delegate to the UN-sponsored
World Youth Assembly. Theodor-:
akis, an avowed Communist freed
from detention in Greece earlier
this year, said he would not sit }'
in the same forum with represent-
atives of the current Greek gov-
ernment. See story, Page 3.
--Associated Press
South Vietnam to undertake
investigation of Con Son prison

Vol. LXXX, No. 43-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Saturday, July 11, 1970 Ten Cents

TiT

(K

WASHI
istration
tax-exemp
do not ha
missions
a year-lor
governmer
An Inte
said the
longer legg
status to
racial dis
gifts to Su
tions for i
IRS Cc
Thrower
emptions
have non
cies.
The cha
that man
the Deep
tentilon of
The ne
over the "
but he sa
be review
in the fal
Those t
said, will 1
normal ex
exempt on
sume tha
and will b
a news co
He said
Exempt
written in(
tors and it
stances ev
policy can
lished stat
constituen
"Where
it has a
mission pc
exemption
a school .<
policies ar
sonable 01
retain its
tion."
Thrower
private scl
the South
action and
an issue
"since at 1

PRI

i

1

WORSHIP

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefyt and Paul Swets
10:30 a.m.-"What's Wrong With the Es-
tablishment?"-Colvin S. Malefyt.
6:30 p.m.-"Those Who Care"-Rev. Dan
Slabough.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.--Evening Prayer.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor

SUNDAY
-Matins.

10.30 a.m.-

t

WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.--Discussion.
9:00 p.m.--Worship.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert. Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
SUNDAY, JULY 12
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover
Rupert: "What On Earth Has Happened
to Our Morality?"
Broadcast WNRS, 1290 AM-WNRZ, 103 FM,
1 1:00 a.m. to noon.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Worshio at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Holy Communion.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-"Hope for the Future?"
6:00 p.m.-"2 plus 1 equals Church."
UNITY CENTER OF
PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY
310 S. State
663-4314
Mrs. Eleonore Kraft, Minister
Sunday Service-11:00 a.m.
Study Class-Mrs. Kraft-7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Prayer and Counseling-10:00 a.m. Wednes-
day.
Center Is Open-Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
1 1-2; Tuesday, 3-6 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
1 :00 a.m.-For sure, plus any other time we
happen to fall in together-Come and find
out.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 a.m.--Worship Service.
Sunday at 10:45 a.m.-Sunday Morning Class.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Service.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith,: Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
10:00 a.m.-Guest speaker: Prof. Preston W.
Slosson-"Civic Obedience and Disobedi-
- ence."

For information, transportasion, personalized
help, etc. phone 76>-6299 or 761-6749.
THE ARKn
1421 Hill-761-1451
Communal Dinner.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson,
W. C. Wright
Worship Services-9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School-9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600, Sunday,-8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 663-7321.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Ave.
Erwin A._Goede, Minister
8:00 p.m. - Roger C.. Mills - "People and
Culture of Southeast Asa-"

Baltimore
Detroit
New York
Boston
Washington
Cleveland
*Minnesota
*California
*Oakland
Kansas City
*Milwaukee
Chicago
* late game not

W L
52 32
46 36
45 38
42 40
39 47
37 46
West
53 26
49 34
45 38
32 51
30 55
30 57
included

Pet.
.620
.562
.543
.512
.453
.445
.671
.590
.542
.383
.353
.342

HURON HILLS BAPTIST
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson

Yesterday's Results
Detroit 4, Baltimore 2
Boston 7, Cleveland 1
Washington 2, New York 1
Kansas City 8, Chicago 6, 1st.
Kansas City 2, Chicago 0, 2nd.
Minnesota at California, inc.
Milwaukee at Oakland, inc.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

GB
5
6%
14
34 z
6
10-
23
26
27

.1.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

CHURC

By The Associated Press
South Vietnam launched an investiga-
tion yesterday into conditions on the
prison island of Con Son as an interna-
tional furor shaped up over charges of
mistreatment of prisoners there.
The latest charges were leveled by three
Saigon University students recently re-
leased from Con Son. They called a news
conference to recount their experiences
in captivity. The trio claimed that, in
addition to the previously disclosed "tiger
cages," prisoners were kept in what they
called "cattle cages."
As many as 17 prisoners were jammed
into "cattle cages," the students claimed.
They described the cells as hotter than
the smaller "tiger cages," in which, they
said, inmates were confined without ade-
quate water, food or sanitation facilities.
The students charged that South Viet-
namese authorities lied about the "tiger
cages" when they said Thursday that 400
of the island's 9,000 prisoners were con-
fined in them.
The students contended that the "tiger
cages" held about 1,200 inmates, includ-
ing women and children.
Radio Hanoi, in a follow-up of charges
made at the Paris peace talks, claimed
that more than 100 political prisoners
died in the "tiger cages" in the first nine
months of last year and that another 100
were missing.
In Britain, the Times of London corn-
mented editorially that "the tiger cages
speak for themselves all too clearly.,
"What sort of a government is being
defended at great cost in American
lives?" the Times asked.
The Saigon government's investigation

of Con Son was undertaken by a 10-man
team from the Interior Ministry. The
team flew to the island 140 miles south-
east of Saigon for an on-the-spot in-
quiry.
The investigation, ordered by Premier
Tran Thien Khiem, marked a quick turn-
about by the government, which said
Thursday that no special probe would
be made.
The clamor over Con Son erupted after
disclosures of beatings, shackling of pris-
oners and other mistreatment that were
made following a visit to the island last
week by two U.S. congressmen.
In a statement announcing the official
probe, the government said: "If, as a re-
sult of the investigation, the charges are
found to be accurate, the government
will take steps to redress the situation
and to order the abolition of the so-
called tiger cages.
"It is the policy of the government of
the Republic of Vietnam to give decent
.treatment to all prisoners, civilian and
military, and to strictly observe interna-
tional agreements on prisoners, particu-
larly the Geneva agreements."
Meanwhile to dramatize that North
Vietnam has also been guilty of POW
mistreatment, a letter signed by 86 sen-
ators protesting North Vietnam's "inhu-
mane treatment" of U.S. prisoners of war
has been sent to Hanoi.
Sen. Birch Bayh (D-Ind.), who initi-
ated the letter, said it is designed to
demonstrate Americans are united on the
prisoner of war issue.
The letter, sent to Premier Pham Van
Dong, expressed "outrage at the persist-

ent callous attitude manifested toward
United States personnel missing in ac-
tion and the inhumane treatment of
United States prisoners detained in
Southeast Asia."
It said, "In obvious disregard of human
decency, the Democratic Republic of
Vietnam continually has refused to ad-
here to basic humanitarian obligations
concerning detained prisoners."
The letter noted that senators have
disagreed over U.S. war policies but are
united in insisting on humane treat-
ment of prisoners.

New York
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal

47
48
42
39
35
35
West

L
37
39
41
45
48
51

Pet.
.560
.553
.506
.465
.422
.407

GB
1
4
111%
13
812
17
18
241a
261a

Cincinnati 60 26 .698
*Los Angeles 50 33 .602
Atlanta 41 41 .500
San Francisco 40 42 .488
Houston 35 50 .412
"San Dileo 34 53 .391
* late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Montreal 9. New York 7
Chicago 2 Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 2.
Atlanta 11, Cincinnati 9, 1st.
Cincinnati 3, Atlanta 1, 2nd.
Los Angeles at San Diego, inc.
San Francisco 8, Houston 5

MRS. SYBIL STOCKDALE of Coranado, Calif.,
League of Families of American Prisoners and Missin
with her group after asking House Speaker John M
joint session of Congress on the POW issue.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan