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July 10, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-10
Note:
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 10, 1970

Friday, July 10, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FREE BOOKS, ANYONE?

_Trevino

leads

British

I

Volume

F'

is

(Continued from Page 1)
Is a yearbook which comes out
once a year. Second is a refer-
ence service which answers any
questions a family might have
which are not in the encyclo-
pedia.
The "advertising families" are
asked, which the company feels
is fair, to pay for the "produc-
tion cost" of these "up-to-date"
services. However, the salesman
glibly assures the couple, this
cost is roughly a dime a day, or
what a family would pay for
their newspaper.
Toward the end of the "quali-
fier" the salesman explains he
has some materials which he
can show the couple. If the hus-
band and wife are still interest-
ed. they will ask to see the ma-
terials, and the salesman will
go into the next phase called
the "presentation.''
THE PURPOSE of the "pre-
sentation" is two-fold. First is
to show the couple the encyclo-
pedia is of top quality. Second
is to convince the couple that
advertising families get a tre-
mendous bargain over people
who buy the encyclopedia out-
right.
Throughout the "presenta-
tion" the salesman gives the
subtle impression that he would
be doing the family a great favor
if he were to "qualify" them for
the program. The husband and
wife are thus unconsciously put
in the position of wanting to
"qualify" as an "advertising
family."
The "presentation" empha-
sizes the fact that Collier's en-
cyclopedia is part of the con-
glomerate Crowell Collier and
MacMillan, Inc., under the as-
sumption that people will be im-
pressed by an affiliation with a
large diversified educational cor-
poration.
The salesman proudly points
out that La Salle Extension Uni-

versity and the Berlitz Schools
of Languages are both owned by
Crowell Collier and MacMillan,
which is true. He also mentions
that National Geographic maga-
zine and Rand-McNally (map
company) are also owned by
Crowell Collier and MacMillan,
which is false..
National Geographic magazine
is the non-profit journal of the
National Geographic Society.
Edwin Snider, assistant secre-
tary of the magazine, empha-
sized that National Geographic,
is not affiliated with Collier.
"Any such claims are absolutely
false," said Snider. "We have
absolutely no connection with
Collier or any other encyclope-
dia.
Treasurer of Rand-McNally,
Harry Brown, explained that al-
though his company prints and
binds the Collier's encyclopedia,
Crowell Collier and MacMillan
does not own them.
IN THE "PRESENTATION,"
the salesman explains that the
Collier company has two plans
by which an "advertising fam-
ily" may pay the "production
cost" on the up-to-date services.
(These up-to-date services last
for 10 years.)
The first plan is that the com-
pany will give the family a little
calender bank, into which they
must put a dime a day plus a
quarter at the end of the week
for a total of 85 cents per week.
At the end of every month, ex-
plains the salesman, a collector
,will come around with a key and
open the bank, take out the
money, and-give the family a
receipt. This collector will 'come
every month for ten years.
The second plan is' one in
which the family pays by check
each month and pays the entire
"production cost" for ten years
in 35 months. If the family
chooses the shorter payment

plan, they will receive as pre-
miums a 20 volume set of Har-
vard Classics, a 10 volume set
of Collier's Junior Classics, and
a bookshelf.
The company k n o w s that
everyone will take the shorter
plan in order to receive the pre-
miums. If by some chance a
family wants the longer plan,
the salesdian will "disqualify"
them as an "advertising family,"
because the company has no ar-
rangments for sending out col-
lectors every month.

For'f
-family" will have to . pay the
"royalty fees," the $15 is covered
by the dime a day "production
cost."
The New York office of Crow-
ell Collier and MacMillan, how-.
every, says the yearbook retails
for $6.95 and that figure in-
cludes all royalty fees. The "ad-
vertising family" thus receives
no discount over what an or-
dinary family would pay for the
yearbook.
The other part of the up-to-
date services - the reference

cid'

THE 01 KE S o
ou. 'Wi Ef e st.
o +. =5at 11-6
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-

The sales banter when the
Cpllier's Junior Classics are in-
troduced goes beyond deception
to outright lying. "Did you ever
watch Walt Disney," the sales-
man asks the couple. "Do you
remember how he used to take
a book off the shelf and start
reading from it? Well, nine
times out of ten that book was
one of the Collier's Junior Clas-
sics."
People are very impressed
when they learn that an author-
ity on children's educational en-
tertainment such as Walt Dis-
ney regularly used Collier's Jun-
ior Classics. A spokesman for
Walt Disney Productions, Inc.,
however, denied that Disney
used the Junior Classics in his
television shows. "The book was
almost always a dummy," said
the spokesman. "Itwas never a
particular book."
THE UP-TO-DATE services
which an advertising family re-
ceives for ten years and for
which they supposedly pay only
the "production cost" are, as
mentioned earlier, a yearbook
and a subscription to the Collier
Reference Service.
The yearbook (or supplement)
which comes out once a year
contains information about the
preceeding year and is cross-
referenced into the original set,
the same as most other year-
books for most other encyclo-
pedias.
The salesman will say the
book retails for $15 plus $6.95
for "royalty fees." He explains
that although an "advertising

service - allows the family to
write in and get reports or
speeches on any type of research
question. The salesman says this
service is sold to people who buy
the encyclopedia outright for
$60 for a year's subscription of
10 speeches or reports.
"Advertising families," says
the salesman, receive a 10 year
subscription to the reference
service as part of the "produc-
tion cost."
An employe at the New York
office of the Collier Reference
Service, however, says the ref-
erence service comes with every
purchase of an encyclopedia and
there is no price set on the
service.
While the salesman recapitu-
lates what it could cost for the
normal family to buy just the-
up-to-date services - $15 for
the yearbook plus $60 for the
reference service making a grand
total of $75 a year - he casual-
ly mentions that the nationally
advertised price of the encyclo-
pedia is $557.
The enraptured couple listen-
ing to the salesman's presenta-
tion now realizes what a tre-
mendous bargain they are get-
ting for their letter and permis-
sion to use it.
WHAT THE HUSBAND and
wife don't realize is that the
nationally advertised price of
the encyclopedia is not $557-it
is $329.50.
The total package which, an
"advertising family" receives is:
a 24 volume set of the Collier's
encyclopedia, a 20 volume set of

Harvard Classics, a 10 volume
set of Junior Classics, and a ten
year subscription to the refer-
ence service. The "advertising
family" will pay $479.50, alleged-
ly for up-to-date services, and
this figure does not include sales
taxes or finance charges. (Fi-
nance charges over 35 months
and sales tax bring the total
price to $552.68.)
A famliy which buys the same
items an "advertising family"
receives would pay $329.50 for
the encyclopedia, $81.69 for a
22 volume set of Harvard Clas-
sics (the 20 volume set is not
available except in the "adver-
tising" program and $79.50 for
the 10 volume Junior -Classics.
-The total is $490 69, excluding
sales tax. finance charges, and
aside from possible discounts
which are sometimes available
for buying a large number of
books.
The "advertising family" will
thus receive only an $11 discount
over families which outrightbuy
the components of the "adver-
tising" package. Far from re-
ceiving books as part of an "ad-
vertising" program from which
Collier supposedly makes no
profit, the "advertising family"
is buying $500 worth of books
which they would have never
considered had they known they
would have to pay the retail
price.
GEORGE PLATSIS, head of
the Consumer Protection divi-
sion of the Michigan Attorney
General's office, explained that
since companies like Collier sell
in the privacy of their custom-
ers' homes, they cannot be mon-
itored by law enforcement agen-
cies.'
"People generally are unable
to give us an accurate descrip-
tion of what the salesman said,"
said Platsis. "If people could ac-
curately describe in detail what
type of presentation the sales-
man made, we could prosecute
many more companies."
Guarding against deceptive
trade practices has always been
the official province of the Fed-
eral Trade Commission. Pro-
ceedings by the FTC, however,
are often very slow. For example,
on Jan. 18, 1960 the FTC began
legal action against Crowell Col-
lier and MacMillan, Inc. and its
wholly-owned subsidiary, Col-
lier and Son, charging that the
latter had used unfair and de-
ceptive methods in the door-to-
door sales of encyclopedias.
Last May 27, the Sixth U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals finally
upheld an FTC cease and desist
order against Collier. And the
case is not closed yet. Collier
has 60 days from May 27 in
which to file an appeal to the
U.S. Supreme Court, which they
will undoubtedly do.
But until the Supreme Court
takes action on the case, and
perhaps even afterwards, Collier
.will continue to "place" ency-
clopedias and people will con-
tinue to be fooled into buying
books which they did not want
and do not need.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor.,*h-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
M>chigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

Defending British Open champ Tony Jacklin stalks his ball yes-
terday as he completed his rain-shortened first round. Jacklin was
eight under when the rains came, and finished with a 67 and
added a 70 yesterday to trail Lee Trevino by one stroke.
Judge freezes{
Eagle, assets SBET
PHILADELPHIA (/P) - A
judge placed the assets of the
Philadelphia E a g I e s football P
team under court jurisdiction
Thursday.
Common Pleas Court Judge EARN EXJ
Edward J. Bradley ruled: "De-
fendants Eagles management
shall not sell, lease or transfer -
any interest in, or dispose of
any assets of the Philadelphia Apply in person:
Eagles football club except im pern
the ordinary course of business, Human Perfo
without the consent of the Perry Building
court."
Judge Bradley ordered them or coll
to file a certified financial
statement of the club's opera-
tions within 20 days. If they
don't do so. the court will or-
der an audit.
The ruling apparently allows
the club to continue to make
player trades and- sign new ore running for C
players. "iin"ricr't r

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland )
- Lee Trevino, winner of the
U.S. Open in 1968, carded five
birdies yesterday and led the
British Open golf field into the
third round with a 136 total
and a one-stroke margin over
defending champion Tony Jack-
lin of England and Jack Nick-
laus of Columbus, Ohio.
Trevino sank a p u t t of 25
feet at the third hole and an-
other one of 20 feet at the ninth
as he began the move that put
him out in front of the best
field this championship, first
played in 1860, has ever seen.
Then the Texan got a birdie
at the 11th hole after sending a
- nine iron within five feet of the
cup, chipped three feet away
for another bird at the twelfth.
On t h e eighteenth, Trevino
curled a 75-foot putt from the
fringe to within inches of the
hole to move in front.
Trevino's two-round score of
136 was eight under par. Jack-
lin and Nicklaus were bracketed
at 137. At 139 were five English-
men - Neil Coles, Maurice
Bembridge, Tommy Horton,
Clive Cla'k and John Richard-
son--- and Doug Sanders,
Houston. Tex., and Harold Hen-
ning, South Africa.
Arnold Palmer of Latrobe,
Pa., and Christy O'Connor of

I

Sneeded for

I

TRA MONEY
r. minimum
rmance Center
g-Rm. 111
764-1590
PEA(E CANDIDATES
ongress in two nearby
Minn to unn t r ~-

I

Ireland were another stroke
further back at 140.
The championship ran into
trouble Wednesday because of
torrential rain and lightning af-
ter two-thirds of the field had
finished. So the Royal and An-
cient officials decided that play-
ers still left on the course should
mark their balls and start from
that position yesterday.
Many players argued the
whole scores for t h e first
r-ound even involving t h e
players who h a d finished -
should have been wiped out.
Roberto de Vicenzo, former
British Open champion f r o m
Argentina, Bert Yancey, Pom-
pano Beach, Fla., Trevino and
Kel Nable, another form Open
champion from Australia were
among the many who complain-
ed about the decision to con-

t
1
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i
t
r y
1
t

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Here's
O l d leie
at thei

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-Associated Press
Get in there - stupid ball t !

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Aug. 4 primary against old-line Democratic
opposition. These are the big Congressional
races in Michigan because they can be won.
18th dist. (Birmingham etc.) Mrs. Annetta Miller
HQ 1-645-9454
19th dist. (Livonia etc.) Ronald Hecker
HQ 1 -476-4063
NEEDED NOW: Campaign coordinators.
No experience necessary if you can work hard, like
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665-3166.

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Album No. 3
only $3.50
tax included
HI-FI BUYS

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The Ants Go Marching One by One ...
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