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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-09

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94V ir~ounDail
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by stpdents at the
University of Michigan
Editoriol orinted in The Michican Daily exPress the individual
Opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reorints.

Thursday, July 9, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Practice what you preach

THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

Materofprincile
THIS SUMMER, there has been a great deal said about
the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) by the University
administration, Student Government Council (SGC), the
Michigan Daily, and GLF itself. Unfortunately, the dis-
cussions have been largely confined to these groups, and
a few others such as Women's Liberation and SDS, and
ignored by the general student body.
This silence by the majority of the University freed
President Fleming to deny GLF, a recognized student or-
ganization, the use of University facilities for a midwest-
ern conference. And, the continued silence of the student
body has now allowed Stanfield Wells, director of the
Michigan Union, to unilaterally deny GLF the use of
Union facilities for an indefinite period.
Wells did this, despite the fact that it is the policy of
the Union directors to make Union facilities available to
all recognized student organizations, and despite the fact
that student fees run the Union.
AS DISHEARTENING as the arbitrary and discrimatory
actions of these two administrators are, the reaction
of the student body, and its easy acceptance of societal
prejudices against homosexuality is even more disurbing.
Looking on the actions against GLF with little more
than amusement, the same student body which purports
to be concerned about the Vietnam war, and increased
black enrollment at the University has failed to take the
principles behind those positions, and apply them to other
situations that arise.
A student body interested in democracy and equality
cannot sit by idly while the University administration
deals discriminatorily with a section of the student body,
ignoring even its own procedures for due process.
If the ideals of democracy and equality are to become
realities, then their principles amust be applied in all situ-
ations. Prejudices, such as the prejudice against homo-
sexuals, cannot be tolerated for they make those prin-
ciples meaningless unless concrete attempts are made to
implement them.
--ALEXA CANADY
Gentleian, scholar?
RECENT SCHOLARLY research has shown that Presi-
dent Nixon may be more literate than many people
think. It seems that he occasionally dips into Greek civi-
lization now and then to review choice political rhetoric.
The "silent majority," for example, was used by Homer
to refer to the dead . - -
-N. C.
NIGHT EDITOR: ERIKA HOFF

BY DEBRA THAL
MONDAY NIGHT, history Prof.
Stephen Tonsor, along with
several other professors, President
Robben Fleming, and State Sen.
Gilbert Bursley - no students,
women, or blacks - took part in
a panel discussion on student un-
rest.
Tonsor spoke out very strongly
agoainst violence a n d campus
imisfits." He condemned violent
tactics and repeatedly defined the
University as the home of a "ra-
tional inquiry,"
"We do need to get misfits off
the campus. There are a lot of
people there who really don't be-
long there and campus unrest will
exist uintil we solve this problem
in some systemized fashion," Ton-
sor said.
The "weeding out" of these mis-
fits, Tonsor said would have to be
done by the state legislators and
the Regents. Tonsor emphasized
that the issue of student unrest
must be solved in isolation from
the society at large. The Univer-
sity must have it's own values
which the students must accept or
else the University is "doomed,"
he said.
After the discussion had ended,
several students and church mem-
bers interrupted the departure of
the various panel members to
question them on their views.
TONSOR STOPPED to talk to
an art student who questioned
the role of the art and m us i c
schools in an institution designed
solely for rational inquiry. She
felt that art, for her, was an emo-
tional as well as an intellectual
experience.
As the discussion broadened to
general discussion of rational in-

quiry, another student joined in.
Hle felt communication was a
necessary part of rational inquiry.
He also said the professor was too
arrogant in talking to the art stu-
dent and that his concept of the
function of the University was the
source of his arrogance,
Throughout the time the stu-
dent was speaking, Tonsor ap-
peared to be rather bored, glanc-
ing around the. room. When the
student asked that he look him in
the eye, Tonsor, feeling that he
had been insulted, replied, "I will
punch you in the nose. He later
said he "felt it was the only manly
thing to do."
Tonsor reportedly raised his
fists and advanced on the young
man.
A janitor came over and in-
formed the student that he was
in a house of God and no fighting
was allowed. A middle - aged
church member came to the de-
fense of the student who had not
acted violently. She pointed Ton-
sor out as the one who was caus-
ing the trouble.
As the janitor apologized to the
student and left, Tonsor s a i d,
"I'd like nothing better than to
pulverize you."
The student replied th a t he
wanted to relate to the professor
as a h u m a n being and didn't
want to fight with him. And he
left. .
TONSOR EARLIER HAD ve-
hemently condemnned the use of
force and urged an atmosphere of
rational inquiry. However, he act-
ed precisely as he charged the
"misfits" did, threatening violence
instead of acting rationally - all
over a few words.
The contradiction between Ton-
sor's actions and words is only one

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FOR FALL: modern 2-man, close to CAMPUS-HOSPITAL REDUCED, attirac- ROOMMATE needed - July-Aug., own
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room for man or woman, 21 or over, 7U43
ROOMS FOR RENT for rest of summer house refrigerator. $10.50/wkg. Lease
and some available for fail term. through Aug. 663-5666 or 971-6270. OWN BDRM, in large 5 rm. apt., close
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2vai or fU.M nlts Assocampus,- 668-6906. Fall. 14Ctc 7846. 3U42
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6448. I5Ctc
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SINGLE ROOM. 428 Cross St. AA. $55, 1335 S. University 665-8825 Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann Arbor
663-3886. 21C43 10Gtc --rustGo. Phone 769-2800. 22083

LINES I day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1.55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8190
5 i0.70

2 doys
1.60
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3.40
3.75
4:15
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3 doys
2.35
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25.55
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4 d
3.
4.
4
4
6
7,
7
8
9.
9.;
17.
25
33
41

UNCONTRACTED Cl

example of the contradictions at
the University. It seems absurd
that professor advocating non-
violence and a peaceful atmos-
phere for rational inquiry should
physically threaten a student who
accused h i m of being arrogant
and who challenged his theory of
rational inquiry.
However, he did.
A student challenged a profes-
sor's intellectual theories, h i s
firmly held convictions, and the
professor could o n 1 y react vio-,
lently.
How can a person who cannot
handle the contradictions in him-
self handle any role in a Univer-
sity designed for rational inquiry?
Violence between individuals
never promotes communication
and communication is necessary
for Tonsor's beloved theory of ra-
tional-inquiry.

Additional costs per day after six do
Ads that are 1%/.,, 2h, 3V%, etc.
average of the lower and higher

Letters to the Editor

It won't work
To the Editor:
ROBERT KRAFTOWITZ in his
editorial "L e g a l i z e addictive
drugs" (Daily, June 13) raises
some interesting issues, but ends
with three conclusions with which
I disagree.
His first conclusion is that le-
galizing the sale of addictive drugs
or narcotics would not increase
the number of addicts, reasoning
that since narcotics were already
so easy to obtain, the legalization
would not increase their use and
therefore the number of addicts.
But, if addicting drugs are made
available without restriction, more
people would become addicted.-
ALL MEDICINES are danger'=
ous, some more than others. Nar-
cotics-heroin, morphine, codine,
Talwin, Demerol-are doubly dan-
gerous. First, - the danger they

share with all other drugs, that of
the effects, side-effects, and ad-
verse reactions, the dangers of
overdose, and concerns with pur-
ity. But, moreover, there as a sec-
ond danger, that of addiction, with
all its real horrors. Should we le-
galize narcotics if they would be
available to people unfamiliar
with their use and misuse, by peo-
ple with medical conditions ag-
gravated by narcotics (e.g. asth-
ma), or by children, who are more
sensitive to the adverse effects,
and who are more ignorant of the
issues? Or should we push for
more liberal laws regarding use of
narcotics by people trained in
their effects? I favor the latter.
Addiction has traditionally, as
it is in Kraftowitz's editorial, been
relegated to legal remey as ulti-
mate solution, and that is the
mistake. Addiction per se is pri-
marily a medical, psychological
and social problem, and the solu-

tions lie in such costly and time
consuming programs as Oddessey
House in New York City, Synanon
in Detroit, and possibly the Lex-
ington Prison program where
these aspects of addiction are at-
tacked. To imply that by legaliz-
ing narcotics, the problem of ad-
diction would be solved or even
benefitted, is as naieve as to take
the opposite tack and attempt to
eliminate addiction by fervently
punishing transgressors. We need
of course to markedly modify laws
relating to narcotics, to remove
the issue from the legal sphere,
and then to attempt to solve it.
We must give qualified people
freer hand in treating addiction,
and we must realize that addiction
is not desirable. Only then will we
be aiming at a cure for the prob-
lem, not just of one symptom of
the problem.
Fritz Miller
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Summit
Associates
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL
761-8055
49Ctc
EDINBURGH APTS., 912 Brown St. The
Royal Dutch Apts., 715 Church. The
King's Inn Apts., 1939rDewey. Taking
applications for fall rental for all 3
locations. For rental information call
761-6156 or 761-3466. 4C41
CAMPUS
NEW FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAHLMANN
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
71-700
38tc
711 ARCH-Near State and Packard-
Modern 2-bdrm, apts. for Fall. Dish-
washer, balcony, air-cond., and much
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
AVAIL. FOR SUMMEt & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily.
noon to 5:30r Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p~m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. liCte
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS?
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENIM:
Super Slims6....6.50
Button-Fly6.......6.50
Traditional.......6.98
Bells............7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS........ .2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's ... 5.50
(4 Colors)-
Sto-Prest "White"
Levi's . 6.98
Nuvo's .. ......8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's Store
122 E. Washington

AUGUST OCCUPANCY
(2 bdrm. unit--summer i term)
Campus area, cool, furnished apart-
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm,-ample park-
ing. contact Resident Manager, Apt.
102, 721 S. Forest St 16Ctc
Apartments
Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALL I

663-0511
761-5440

50CI

-room T 6k)T fZ -AVW LA6
W '~Cf1O A TU L? A U ' -PLAA)TATIOI)

SUMMER SUBLETS
761 -8055
14Utc
PERSONAL
CHERYL-Want a Mickey Mouse shirt?
Call Me. LR. FD41
Gay Liberation Front
Meeting Tonight at 8:30 P.M.
Union Lounge
42'41

~69M~ LtO ~AV WCP U WY £OOmJ e Y Mr6~ ~'~P
WE5c 7 w RE WA CAD5& J 6W l TO SC''L
wiAX& W6R V!CTYJP$ MLW KIV5 &WF HMOHUOGOniCR
~ 0$ (N~RIAI$F. 4 AH~NJ.COUMI~$WSz

r
s
g

HELP WANTED1
-LADY NEEDED-j
Girl interested in learning professional
massage phone 665-7971 after 5 p.m
only. 7H42
CO-EDS, need a job for the rest of the
summer? Full and p~art time jobs
available now. Teach informative and
corrective makeup techniques while
selling leading line of cosmetics, Will
hire all whowant to work. Call
George, 662-3883. 81146!
LIVE-IN babysitter for two delightful
tots, 5 and 7, for remainder of sum-
mer in motherless home. Room, salary
and meals. Call mornings or evenings1
761-2023. HD
INTERESTED IN GIVING TOURS OF'
Central Campus? Prospective Univer-
sity of Michigan students and their
families are eager to be shown the
campus. If you have a spare hour a
week to volunteer your services,
please call Betty van den Bosch at
the Alumni Association - 764-0384-
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or
call John Hamilton at 761-7808 in the
evenings. 6H43
OWNER OF 60 ft. schooner plans 1-3
yr. world cruise. Needs cameraman
experienced with 16 mm color film.
Also needs competent nurse. Pay var-
ies from low to non-existent. Write
Leo A. Frankowski, 185 Puritan, High-
land Park, Michigan. 5H42
LAW ENFORCEMENT DIRECTOR
(Macomb County Law Enforcement and
Criminal Justice Commission are
seeking tyre services of a Law En-
forcement Director to co-ordinate the
activities of the commission and pro-
vide a liaison between the local, re-
gional and state planning groups and
law enforcement agencies within the
County.
Applicants must possess at least a
baccalaureate degree or qualifications
acceptable to the Crime Commission
and have some experience with the
components of a Criminal Justice
System.
Salary, depending upon qualifications.
Maximum $15,000.00.
Send resume to:
Edmund A. Schmidt
Chairman Judiciary Public Safety
Committee
Board of Commissioners
County Building -
Mt. Clemens, Michigan 48043
4H4C
WANTED: undergraduate to assist pro-
fessor (in Wheelchair) in return for
room and board, 761-9034 after 5.
3H44
ART STUDENTS who are now taking,
or have recently taken painting
courses wanted for psych experiment.
Total lime will be about 2 hours,
spread over 3 testing sessions, pay
$2.50/hr. Call David Shapiro, days,
429-2531, or eves., 663-9769, to set up
appt. 50H41
EARN $25 by donating . cerebrospinal
fluid. Need 21-40 yr. old males-fe-
males. 764-0298. 11142
AMERICAN MALE U.M. students need-
ed for z hr. psych, experiment. Pay
$2 plus winnings. Phone 668-7626 be-
tween 6-,8 .p.m., Mon.-Fri. Ask for
Alvin. I2H43

LIVE-IN babysitter for two delightful
tots, 5 and 7, for remainder of sum-
mer in motherless home. Room, salary
and meals. Call mornings or evenings
761-2020. FD
-LADY NEEDED-
Girl interested in learning professional
massage phone 665-7971 after 5 p.m.
only. 40F42
AMANDA FENWICK has new sandals,
fall shoes, and truck driver belts. 522
E. William, 41F44
COOKIN GLESSONS-Beginners or adv.
10 students. Write Apt. 3, 1412 Geddes
for info. FD42
SINCE ALMOST all gem diamonds
come from Africa, a brand label for
a ring mounting does not guarantee
the quality ofsthe major diamond in
the ring. Austin Diamond, 1209 S.
Univ. 663-7151. Ftc
MARIA YAQUINTO gets excited over
Fourth of July sparklers!
Shake a leg and get
well, Maria!
The Orientation Staff
fespecially Team C)
FD43"
PHOTOGRAPHY
Portraits on location or at your place.
WEDDINGS too. Member of Profes-
sional Photographers of America Inc.I
Call Richard Lee before 1 p.m. at 761--}
9452. FD50
WALTER E. SHAPIRO graduated
BA May 1970
with distinction, and
immediately
LOST HIS JOB,
proving once again the true
value of a University education.
FD4I
SEXOLOGIST, interviewing college
women, 17-35, on sexual behavior, for
research design. Please give name,
phone: Box 73 Daily. 38F42
WAR: a proceeding that ruins those
who win. WILDFLOWER, the unique
boutique; 516 E. WILLIAM (above1
the Campus Bike Shop). 37F43
FREE U CRAFTS FAIR--sell, display,
trade. July 17 and 18. On the Diag.'
Leaves of Grass. 763-2130. 27F43
SMILE: a curve that can set a lot of
things straight - WILDFLOWER: the
unique boutique, 516 E. WILLIAM
(above the bike shop). 36F43
UNION BILLIARDS and table tennis.
12 mid. Sun.-Thurs., 1 n.m. Fri.-Sat.
35F41
MIXED BOWLING LEAGUES
SIGN UP NOW! UNION LANES
24F43
PAINTING - Student desires painting
jobs, inside and outside. Four years
experience. Call 662-4736. FD
NOTICE TO MICHIGAN DAILY BOX
HOLDERS, MAIL IS IN THE FOL-
LOWING BOXES: 123, 30, 5, 55. FD
TRANSPORTATION
WANT RIDERS to New York City. Leav-
ing on Friday the tenth. Call Psull
at 665-4830. GD42
WANT TRAVELLING companion for
Europe and Africa, possibly India.
Leaving early Aug. Pete, eves., 769-
7161. 41G42
PLANE TICKET London-Detroit, Au.
6. $90. 764-1400. 39G41
iCKETS
2 TICKETS, Detroit-London, one-way
July 15, for sale. Call collect 1-359-
8542. - 23Q42

2 FREE CATS
Housebroken--Lovable
665-2565 after 5
BUSINESS SERVICES

T1

THESES, PAPERS (iec. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERIENCED secretary desires typing
in her home or part time in your of-
-ice. Call 971-1533. 27J43
DON'T YOU just hate to type? Let
Candy do it. Cheap, quick, profes-
sional. Call 665-4830. JD44
EXPERIENCED EDITOR
Skilled in organizing and
presenting special projects.
Write Mich. Daily Box 68 or
phone 971-6445.
J3

USED CARS
1962 CONTINENTAL-as is, $150. Needs
wheels and fuel pump; otherwise in
good shape. Call 663-3482 or 663-5512.
ND41
PORSCIE-1965 Coupe. 35,000 miles, ex-
cellent except for some rust. $2300 or
best offer. 662-0309. 11N46I
COMPACT luxury sedan, 1968 Triumph
2000. $895. 761-9180 or 663-9831. 10N43
VW, 1966 -Red conver. Radio, good con-
dition. Best offer. 971-0420 after 6
p.m. 971-3708. 12N47
1969 TRIUMPH 500, low mileage. excel-
lent condition. 761-8355 13N43
'65 VW--ne owner. Make offer. 456-
4967, Clinton. 6N42
'66 FORD Galnxy 500, 2-dr., power
brakes, body and mileage excellent.
$750/best offer. 663-5149. 7N43
CLASSIC CAR - Triumph TR-3, runs
well. Good cond., hard and soft tops.
$795 or best offer, 769-4488. 8N43
'63 DODGE DART in excellent cond.,
$275. Stop by 425 West Washington.
ND45
WANTED TO RENT
2 BDRM., 1 year, older house, near Ann
Arbor. 662-2762. 17L42
SINGLE APT., normal facilities, for
July-Aug., preferably near campus.
Please reply Box 378, Mich. Daily.
DLtc
PETS AND SUPPLIES
LOVABLE KITTENS. FREE, 6 wks. old.
fCall 665-2805. 13T41
KITTENS and CATS. Cute, trained -
FREE, black, grey. or mixed-up. a
variety of sizes and shapes. Call 665-
4830. TD44

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EXPERIENCED SECRETARY
work in her home. Thesis,I
typing, stuffing etc. IBM
Call Jeanette, 971-2463.

desires
technical
selectric.

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call
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761-4146 or 761-1187
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