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July 08, 1970 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

I * S 4.

Ar

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 8, 1970

Tiger
By The Associated Press
Former Michigan star
Elliot Maddox opened the
tenth inning with a home
run over the left-field fence
to lift the Detroit Tigers to
a 4-3 victory over Boston af-
ter the Red Sox had won the
opener, 8-4.
Reggie Smith got the Red Sox
out of the blocks in the opener
by blasting a first-inning homer
off Tiger starter Earl Wilson.
Successive singles by Carl Yas-
trzemski, Rico Petrocelli, George
A I
in doubt
CHARLESTON, S.C. (1P} -
Cassius Clay's scheduled return
to the ring here tomorrow night
was put in doubt yesterday.
The Charleston County Coun-
cil voted unanimously yesterday
to refuse a contract for the use
of the 4,000-seat county hall for
an exhibition bout by Clay, de-
posed heavyweight champion.
The council acted after being
advised by legal representatives
that no deposit had been placed
by the promoters of the match
to secure the contract for the
county hall.
Promoters admitted this left
the future of the charity bout in
doubt.
The 28-year-old Clay, also
known as Muhammad Ali, was
to step into the ring for the first
time in more than two years to
spar three rounds apiece with
two opponents Thursday.
Clay was to receive only ex-
pense money for his benefit ap-
pearance. Proceeds were to go
to a charity for underprivileged
children.
Clay was to have sparred
three rounds with Jeff Merritt
ofwNew York and three rounds
with Joe Bunger of England.
Ten amateur bouts also were
on the card.

split;

Birds,

Mets

win

(ZAP

irl t ttn

Dat

Scott and B i ll y Conigliaro
brought in two more runs.
Rico Petrocelli belted a two-
run homer in the third and the
Red Sox added three more in
the ninth with help froni slop-
py Tiger fielding.
Jim Northrup walloped two
home runs to help the Tigers
close the gap to 5-4 going into
the ninth, but his efforts were
to no avail as the Red Sox wiped
out the Tigers' hopes with their
ninth inning uprising.
In other American League
action, Baltimore strengthened
their hold on first in the East
by beating the. Yankees 6-2 in
10 innings,- Cleveland moved out
of the cellar and Washington
moved in as the Tribe swept a
pair from the Senators, 7-3 and
7-5, and Milwaukee shoved the
White Sox temporarily into the
West basement by winning the
first of two from the Pale Hose,
4-3.
Brooks Robinson gave the
Orioles the win as he belted a
grand slam homer off after the
Birds had loaded the bases off
Yankee ace reliever Lindy Mc-
Daniel with a walk, a single,
and an error.
Red-hot Ray Fosse paced the
Indians to their sweep with a
homer, a triple, and four RBI's.
Craig Nettles and Eddie Leon
each drove in three runs as the
Indians moved a half-game
ahead of Washington.
Pinch-hitter Ted S a v a g e
clouted a homer in the bottom
of the 12th to lift the Brewers
past Chicago.
In National League action, St.
Louis found out that the inten-
tional walk is a two-edged
sword. The Cardinals decided to
walk Ken Singleton to load the
bases in the bottom of the ninth,
but reliever Sal Campisi walked

Ron Swoboda to force in the de-
ciding run as the Mets won, 4-3.
In the sixth, starter Mike
Torrez unloaded a wild pitch
while giving an intentional pass
to help the Mets score their first
three runs.
Pittsburgh stayed one - half
game back of New York by edg-
ing out Philadelphia, 4-2, and
Chicago clubbed Montreal, 10-7.
In West Division action, the
Cincinnati express rolled on as
the Reds beat .San Diego, 3-0,
San Francisco belted Atlanta,
8-5, and Los Angeles crunched
Houston, 7-2.
Gary Nolan and Clay Carroll
combined for a seven-hitter to
pace the Reds, while Dick Dietz'
tnree-run homer ii f t e d the
Giants past Atlanta. Dodger
pinch-hitter L e n Gabrielson
singled in the tie-breaker and
the Dodgers breezed home.
Miss Brazil
suits up for
beauty tilt-
MIAMI BEACH (A) -- Miss
Brazil's national costume at the
Miss Universe Pageant this year
is a soccer uniform.
It bears the No. 10 of the
uniform worn by Pele, star of
Brazil's world champion team.
Vivacious Elaine Thompson
of Rio de Janeiro will wear the
costume of the pageant Wed-
nesday night. It replaces the
traditional multi-colored Bra-
zilian "Baiano" costume with
a hat adorned by fruit.
"I have seen Pele play many
times," Miss Thompson said.
"He is great."

Vol. LXXX, No. 40-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, July 8, 1970 Ten Cen

GE

ER

L

A

GER

I

GLF,
Europe
cut short
The best laid plans oft go
astray, somebody said. And for
several thousand American stu-
dents vacationing in Europe this
axiom proved true. Students
from Detroit (right) sitting in
a Paris suburb yesterday were
among those waiting for a spe-
cial airlift home after their
sponsoring company, W o r l d
Academy, Inc. filed for bank-
ruptcy.

FRO

Us

G

u

I

k

Swing your partner dosey-doe.
Jack Nicklaus isn't doing the Virginia reel, he's giving a few
pointers to young James Makovich at St. Andrews where the
British Open begins today. Nicklaus is the favorite.
Down with Brown BagsI
CHANGE NOW!I
Yes, if you want to change your old routine
of the same old lunches, try the Michigan
Union buffet.

By E
The director of
Wells, yesterday d
of Union facilities.
The move cam
theater performed
Union by members
crtic Society (SDS
spokesman said th
function of any gro
Wells claimed
of unpleasant peri
priate" and added
General Manager
space to groups er
Wells alleged I
Womens Lib's par
dicated last night
from the Union.
Student Govern
President Jerry D
claims that "he al
power to determine
claims that-his pC
nating against a re
In the theater
an actor representin
conference while u
the background. TI
of a Cambodian w
speech, Nixon also r,
Wells contended
of order and said
Union space becau
what we expect."
During a meetin
GLF secretary Jim
ards of conduct the
GLF to follow to
rights. Wells repori
would have to fit
Wells then decid
ly from the Unior
said last night th
Thursday meeting
Later yesterday
"is designed to prot
sexual exploitation
that Mr. Wells is a
as he is by our the
to protest against
GLF has also hi
a planned midwest
Robben Fleming ha
be bad for the Univ
the use of Universit
GLF says they pla
Fleming's ruling.

Freehan, Oriole trio
head AL All-Stars

Major League?
Standings
AME'RICAN LEAGUE

Bait imore
New York
Detroit
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
xMinnesota
xCalifornia
xOakland
xKansas City
xMilwauke
xChicago

East
W L
51 30
44 36
43 35
41 39
36 44
37 46
West
50 26
48 32
45 36
29 50
29 53
28 54

Pct.
.632
.550
.544
.5x8
.450
.443
.658
.600
.556
.367
.353
.339

G

a--late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Boston 8, Detroit 4, 1st
Detroit 4, Boston 3, 10 inn., 2nd
Baltimore 6, New York 2
Cleveland 7, Washington 3, lst
Cleveland 7, Washington 5, 2nd
Milwaukee 4, Chicago 3-
Chicago at Milwaukee, 2nd, inc.
Kansas City at California, inc.
Minnesota at Oakland, inc.
Today's Games
Boston at Detroit
Minnesota at Oakland
Kansas City at California
Washington ;it Cleveland
New York at Baltimore
Chicago at Milwaukee
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

9?
14 4
15
4
7 14
22%~
24
25
GB
6
11
12zd
1- '
17
20l.
511;
28'4

By The Associated Press
Detroit catcher Bill Freehan
was the only Tiger selected to
the All-Star team, according to
final vote totals released yes-
terday. The American league
champion Baltimore Orioles
placed three men in the starting
line-up.
Oriole first-sacker Boog Pow-
ell emerged with the largest vote
total, 1,007,930, to beat out his
nearest rival, Tiger Norm Cash,
by better than a five to one-
margin. Baltimore rightfielder
Frank Robinson topped the
American League's voting for
outfielders, and Davey John-
son will replace the injured Rod
Carew at second.
Detroit's Dick McAuliffe was
second in the voting for the key-
stone position, but his doctor
advised him to pass up next
Tuesday's All-Star game and
rest his knee, which was injured
last season.
In the only really tight con-
test, Chicago's Luis Aparicio
edged out Boston's Rico Petro-
celli for the shortstop berth by
only 11,000 votes. The ageless
Aparicio is having his best sea-
son since leading the White Sox
to the pennant in 1959.
Minnesota's slugging handy-
man, Harmon Killebrew, beat
out another resurgent veteran,
Oriole Brooks Robinson, for the
third base slot.
Joining Frank Robinson in the
outfield are Washington's gentle
giant Frank Howard and Boston's
Carl Yastrzemski. Left out of
the starting line-up are the
league's three leading hitters,,
all of whom are outfielders.
California's Alex Johnson, New
York's Roy White and Minne-
sota's Tony Oliva all failed to
break into the top three in the
voting, and the Tiger's Willie
Horton, probably the hottest
player in baseball in June, also
missed out.
Oriole pilot Earl Weaver, who
will manage the A m e r i c a n
Leaguers in Cincinnati, can

easily have a strong bench but
only a limited number of places
for his heavy hitters. Weaver
will announce the remainder of
the squad, reserves and pitchers.
tomorrow, and will name his
starting hurler on Monday.
Many complaints were made
about the computerized ballot,
as the fans chose the line-ups
for the first time since the
1950's.
Many players who are having
fine seasons were left off the
ballot, which was printed up be-
fore the season opened. Players
such as Rico Carty, Al Kaline
and Alex Johnson had to rely
on write-in votes, and only Car-
ty was able to break into the
starting nine by virtue of write-
ins.

Michigan Union serves a buffet luncheon in
a relaxed atmosphere. Eat at your leisure
with a selection of meat, salads and desserts
to suit the most discriminating tastes. The
price is only $1.92 plus tax.
TRY IT SOON FOR A CHANGE
Private rooms available by reservation
PHONE 764-7535

to exist in S.

Monday through Friday,

1 1 :45-1 :00. The

CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATION:
Torture cells alleged

GABRIEL TACCHINO
Young French Pianist
DIRECTLY FROM PARIS FOR HIS ONLY AMERICAN
APPEARANCE THIS SUMMER
will pe heard in the second recital in the
SUMMER CONCERT SERIES--
THURS., JULY 16 at 8:30
Raekham Adtru

Vi

SAIGON (MP) - American officials
have known about the "tiger cages"
used by Saigon authorities for political
prisoners, an embassy spokesman said
yesterday, but possess only limited
power to do anything about them.
The use of the cages-actually. stone
compartments 5 by 8 feet-was dis-
closed a f t e r American congressmen
visited Con Son, a prison island run by
the Saigon government.
The ,spokesman could not say
whether American officials had urged
abandonment of the cells, but he as-
serted American officials repeatedly
had suggested that the South Vietna-.
mese improve prison conditions on the
island, 140 miles southeast of Saigon
in the South China Sea.
Reps. August F. Hawkins (D-Calif)
and William R. Anderson (D-Tenn)
said in Washington they found about
400 prisoners crammed into the stone
compartments, three to five persons in
each.
The two legislators were members of
a 12-man fact-finding team from the
House of Representatives that just re-
turned from Indochina. The study
team's only staff member, Thomas R.
Harkin, submitted his resignation,
charging that the group suppressed its
findings of inhumane treatment in the
prison.
Harkin said Rep. Donald Clancy (R-
Ohio) and other members of the team
had argued that the prison findings
would be highly embarrassing, would
overshadow the rest of the trip and

be played out of proportion by the
media.
Harkin said findings that lime is
thrown on prisoners. so cramped for
space that they cannot stand were
stricken from the team's report to the
House. Hawkins and Anderson also
reported that women's cells were filthy
and that prisoners complained of beat-
ings and inadequate water, food and
medicines.
Rep. G. V. Montgomery (D-Miss),
chairman of the committee accused
Harkin of blowing the prison findings
out of proportion.
"The majority of the committee
members were concerned over the pos-
sible reaction the report would have
on the North Vietnamese and their
treatment of American prisoners of
war," Montgomery told newsmen in
Washington.
Harkin said "this argument cut more
deeply than any other" because he
has friends who are POWs. But he
said maximum pressure to improve
South Vietnam's prison conditions
would make the U.S. position more
credible in dealing with Hanoi on
American POWs.
Con Son, often known by its French
name, Polo Condor, was established
by the French in 1862 and now has
some 9,000 mainly political prisoners.
The South Vietnamese government
has stated that the "tiger cages,"
created by the French, have been
abolished.
The two legislators visited the island

e tnam
Thursday to inspect the prison com-
pound and only by entry through a
secret gateway were able to see the
cages.
Frank E. Walton, chief public safety
corrections adviser to the Saigon gov-
ernment, "accompanied the congress-
men on their tour and opposed their
visiting the cages, according to Don
Luce, an interpreter with the group.

New York
P'ittsbuirgh
Chicago
$t. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal

w
45
46
40
39
34
33
West

L
36
38
40
42
47
49

Pct.
.555
.548
.500
.488
.418
.402

G

Cincinnati 59 23 .72
Los Angeles 49 32 .60
Atlanta 41 39 .51
San Francisco 38 42 .471
Houston 34 49 .40
San Diego 32 53 .37
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 10, Montreal 7
Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 2
New York 4, St. Louis .3
Los Angeles 7, Houston 2
Cincinnati 3, San Diego 0
San Francisco 8, Atlanta 5
Today's Gamnes
St. Louis at New York, day
Montreal at Chicago, 2, day
San Francisco at Atlanta
Los Angeles at Houston
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia
San Diego at Cincinnati

1
6
3
5
9
4

(air-conditioned)-

PROGRAM

TICKETS:
$5.00-$4.00-$2.50

Fantasy in G minor. ..Bach-Liszt
Sonata, K. 310............Mozart
Scherzo No, 1 in
B minor, Op. 20.......... Chopin
Scherzo No. 2 in B-flo
minor, Op. 31...........Chopin
Mouvement
Perpetuels, No. 3........Poulenc
Sonata No. 3, Op. 28 ... Prokofieff
ANGEL RECORDS

II

at
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Tower
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
Hours: 9:00 to 4:30, Mon. thru Fri.,
Sat. 9:00to'12:00
(Also 1 1 hours before performance at
Rackhom Auditorium)

THIS SKETCH by a former inmate of the Con Son Island
political prisoners reportedly were beaten with a whip whil
an iron rack and hands tied behind their back.

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