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July 02, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-02
Note:
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I M
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Page Six

Thursday,;July 2, 1970

Thursday, July 2, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

South'
SAIGON 0P)I - Cambodia
send about 10,000 troop
South Vietnam in the con
weeks to receive combat tr
ing. informed sources said
terday.
The South Vietnameser
tary sources reported the
units will begin w o r k in
next two weeks at threeN
namese training facilities.
Instructors will be Vietna
army personnel, the sources
ded.
The first Cambodian elem

Vietnam to train Cambodian troops

Hi gh

Court

rejects

T

will
s to
ming
rain-
yes-
mili-
first
the
Viet-
The
mese
s ad-
rents

are scheduled to
Monday at Due
School and Lam
Training center
Trang, 200 miles
Saigon.

arrive about
My Ranger
Son Infantry
ne'ar Nha
northeast of

A second contingent is sch-
eduled to report a week later to
Chi Lang training center only
a few miles from the Cambo-
dian border west of Saigon, the
sources said. Chi Lang now is
used to train regional and pop-
ular force militiamen.
American advisers normally

are assigned to the South Viet-
namese training camps, but a
spokesman for the U.S. Com-
mand said he had no informa-
tion on whether they would be
involved in training the Cam-
bodians.
In recent days, a group of
Cambodian officers a n d non-
commissioned officers were seen
observing troop training at
Quang Trung center north of
Saigon. Quang Trung is used
for training South Vietnamese
forces defending t h e military
district surrounding Saigon.

The Cambodian trainees are
in addition to soldiers of Cam-
bodian stock born in South
Vietnam who have been sent to
Cambodia since the North Viet-
namese and Viet Cong began
battling the army of Premier_
Lon Nol in March.
About 800 more of these Cam-
bodians, trained by U.S. Green
Berets, arrived in Phnom Penh,
the capital, "yesterday f r o m
South Vietnam. They joined
4,000 others already there.
While some of these forces
have taken to the field, they
are charged primarily with de-
fending Phnom Penh.
In war action yesterday, field
reports said elements of the
South Vietnamese 1st Division
were engaged in heavy fighting
west of Quang Tni, just below
the demilitarized zone. Govern-
ment militiamen also were said
to be involved in the battle, but
first-reports gave no further de-
tails.

Associated Press correspon-
dent John T. Wheeler reported
from Phnom Penh that a
South Vietnamese task force of
more th a n 5,000 troops, sup-
ported by armor, swept north-
west and northeast of the Cam-
bodian capital, but there; were
no reports of contact with the
enemy.
South Vietnamese sources in
Saigon said the task force in-
cluded the armored cavalry reg-
iment from the South Vietna-
mese 9th division, which had
been operating near Takeo, 40
miles south of Phnom P e n h.
Nearly a brigade of 2,500 South
Vietnamese marines also is tak-
ing part in the operation.
The U.S. Command reported
that two American- helicopters
were shot down Tuesday Just
south of the Cambodian border.
Eight Americans were killed and
five wounded.
The, crashes raised to 3,863
the unofficial total of helicop-
ters lost in the war.

N. Vietnam blasts Nixon pledge
to support Cambodian regime

HONG KONG (A) -- North
Vietnam ignored yesterday Pres-
ident Nixon's appeal for serious
peace negotiations and de-
nounced his pledge to help Asian
nations that want to go to the
aid of Cambodia.
In the first reaction to Nixon's
report on Cambodia on Tuesday,
Radio Hanoi asserted: "It is
clear that although U.S. ground
forces have been withdrawn,
the United States is prolonging
and expanding the war in Cam-
bodia through the service of
the mercenary clique supplied
by reactionary authorities in
Southeast Asia.
"Undoubtedly, this move is an
implementation of Nixon's doc-
trine of making Asians fight
Asians for the realization of
U.S. neocolonialism in Asia."
The tenor of the broadcast
and that of a statement by the
North Vietnamese delegation in
Paris indicated that, for the
time being at least, the peace
talks will be confined largely
to recriminations.

The North Vietnamese dele-
gation in Paris called Nixon's
statement a rehash of "his old
allegations, as stubborn as they
are perfidious."
"As far as Cambodia is con-
cerned," a North Vietnamese
statement said, "everyone knows
that the United States sabo-
taged the 1954 Geneva agree-
ments on Indochina.
"The United States set up the
military block of agression in
Southeast Asia, of its own ac-
cord put Cambodia under the
umbrella of this bloc, and sought
a number of times to oust Prince
Norodom Sihanouk."
This referred to the South-
east Asia Treaty Organization
of Australia, Britain, France,
New Zealand, Pakistan, the
Philippines, Thailand and the
United States. The organization
promised support for any nation
in the area threatened with
communist aggression.
The North Vietnamese state-
ment reiterated the old charge
that the United States incited

Premier Lon Nol of Cambodia
to overthrow Sihanouk last
March 18.
"Since April 29, 1970, the
United States has sent 100,000
into Cambodia in an overt ag-
gression," the delegation de-
clared. "And even so, Mr. Nixon
seeks to throw the responsibility
on the Democratic Republic ofI
North Vietnam, impudently pre-
tending that it has 'extended the1
war to Cambodia.'"

HOLIDAY
DOUBLE
PROGRAM!

68BAi C r r

DIAL
8-6416

'V-

z
I-.
z
0
no
C

EvesI Matinees
6:25. 9:05 1:00,3:40
"'AI R PORT' is a great film all the way!"
A ROSS HUNTER Production Chicago Doily News
BURT LANCASTER -DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG. JACQUELINE BISSET -GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN '"MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON - LLOYD NOLAN """" '"A n7 T,*
DANA WYNTER " BARBARA HALE - a n~"
Mon.-Thurs. Fri.-Sat All Day
Eves. Eves. '~' Sundav
J2. 2T 250$2da5
Matinees Monday thru Saturday $1.75
.i The 1 D Iaily 1Toda.!

The North Vietnamese radio
challenged Nixon's assertion
that the Cambodian operation
was a success, saying the U.S.
operation in Cambodia "met
with disastrous failure."
July 4
CAMP-OUT RACE-IN
Spend Friday night July 3 under
the stars in the scenic Irish
Hills and wake up Saturday to
the biggest names in auto rac-
ing. Andretti, Foyt, and Unser
lead the pack at the "Michigan
Twin 200's." Special student
rate $4.50, available at the
track ormcall 71-4210 for
further information.

:D6:" A STUNNING, BEAUTIFULLY
MADE FILM- ONE THAT
YOU WILL NOT FORGET!"
4 -JudithCris, NBC-TV Toy Shaw
"EXCEPTIONALLY POWERFUL
IN BOTH CONCEPT AND
EXECUTION! A HIGH LEVEL
OF CREATIVE CINEMA!"
-Tim. Magzine
"BRILLIANT! REMARKABLE!"
-Joseph Morg.,wscm Newsweek
THE FIFTH HORSEnlAN IS FEAR
A CARLO PONTI PRESENTATION
DISTRIBUTED BYmSIGMA It. A FILMWAYS COMPANY
* AND *
""AN OVERGROUND SEX-PROTEST FILM!"'
Arher Winston, New Yor * Post
"AN IMPERTINENT,
DELICIOUS LITTLE SATIRE.
'NOW

Street theater romps on

AA
dl
Area lan
their legal
Tenants Ur
Supreme C
Tenants U
Court revie
against the
The Tena
that local
spiring to r:
trust laws,
ago by the ]
Court and
U.S. Courtc
Virginia I
represented
petition. H
(the landlor
association,
Managers
monthly. TI
conspired a
tion, and o
apartments
ers. These
reasonably r
housing ma
"Responde
agreed to e
by systema
land sale c
effect of re
housing an
rentals. In
changed det
ness operati
the inevitab
petition in t
The Cour
diction over1
only local c
The'Tena
petition to
the Sherma
ed to cover
activities, bu
of competitil
or faculty ji
and negotiat
lord over re
of interstate
The Supr
ants' Union]I
the ruling c
Ann Arbo
who represer
said the Hig
so much a
a defeat for
"They were
to make a n
didn't buy it
rulings in ti
with more r
added.
When reac
Mrs. Nordin
decision.

Bomber attacks Cambodian peasants

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
July 3 and 4
THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE
dir. RICHARD BROOKS, 1955
Starring: SIDNEY PORTIER
GLENN FORD
ANNE FRANCIS
The Pioneer of Ghetto Films
(Cinema Guild takes this space to wish
all its patrons a happy Fourth of July)
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75C AUDITORIUM

MRISCH PICTURES preatt wl D U L
FEATURE
PICMRE!" THUR. "West Side" 6:45
Wineref " Mermaid" 9:15
fAldet yPANAVISIO
Aa,, m!EUE fT TECHNICOLOR~
nwaus.1;t~gi FRI. "Mermaid" 6:45
NW"West Side" 8:35
--- "Mermaid" 11 :05
"Another Truffaut Triumph .i
-JOSEPH GELMIS, Newsday
"it is the creation of a "Truffaut again displays,
superior movie-maker!" remarkable skill!" "It is really a wildly ex-
-N.Y. Times -William Wolf travagant asd joyful day-
dream from the imagina-
tion of Francois Trauf-
CAME~ j- j faut. I liked everything
T14E BRIDE a b o u t 'MISSISSIPPI
AS ADVERTiSED BELMONDO MERMAID'."
CATHERINE -Newsday
DENEUVE--
40 D
"MSSISSIP NA
SMERMAID"
gi "ee Nyadreced by
...NC I 0 Pw'TH F'O('Lm
OW'd'PT4 eiwam ar LNuuYI
>x OWNTOWN1 A d" ARSON
.~COR by D~elu FGP

By BILL ALTERMAN
Three guerrilla theater performances
of "The Rape of the Cambodian Women"
entertained several hundred onlookers
around campus yesterday,
An 11-member group, under the aus-
pices of the Cambodia DayCommittee,
parodied the actions of the President
and Senate and intermixed those scenes
with scenes of "action" from Cambodia.
Beginning at the Union around noon.
Jude rules
war legal1
NEW YORK (P)-A federal judge in
Brooklyn ruled yesterday that the Viet-
nam war is constitutional, even though
never formally declared by Congress. He
said the lawmakers were giving tacit con-
sent to the President's actions by provi-
ding necessary money and manpower
for the war.
The U.S. attorney's office called the
decision a historic interpretation of the
constitutional mandate that only Con-
gress may declare war.
Ruling against a soldier who sought to
avoid shipment to Vietnam on constitu-
tional grounds, Dist. Judge John F. Dool-
ing, Jr., said:
"It is idle to suggest that the Congress'
is so ingenuous or so inappreciative of
its powers, including the power of im-
peachment, that it cannot seize policy
and action initiatives at will, and halt
courses of action from which it wishes
the national power to be withdrawn.
"Political expediency may have coun-
seled the Congress's choice of the par-
ticular forms and modes by which it has
united with the presidency in prosecuting
the Vietnam combat activities, but the
reality of the collaborative action of the
executive and the legislative required by
the constitution has been present from
the earliest stages."
The soldier involved was Spec. Salvator
Orlando, 21, of Rockville Centre, N.Y.,
who enlisted in the army in 1965 and re-
enlisted May 8, 1968. When he was order-
ed to Vietnam, he filed suit June 11 to
block his assignment overseas.

diag

the actors paraded to the Diag chanting
alternately "rape!" and "kill!" attracting
a crowd of about 200.
The first scene opened on the steps of
the graduate library with "President Nix-
on" calling for peace. But the President
then consulted an advisor representing
conglomerate corporationsrand was con-
vinced that the U.S. must remain in
Southeast Asia to protect business in-
terests.
A third actor-the press--then entered.
During the conversation between the
President and the press, several "peasant
women," who were also on stage, were
killed by an American bomber as they
were working the fields.
Next actors representing S e n a t a r s
Smith, Cooper and Church entered, mus-
ing about how the Negroes ("I mean
blacks") and students were getting uppity
and discussing whether they should cur-
tail the President's power in Cambodia.
Mr. Conglomerate came back on, how-
ever, and convinced the senators that
since the House and President must ap-
prove of their action if they want it to
become law, they must leave out any
mention of the bombings. The "liberal"
senators agreed. As they were agreeing,
the American bomber returned and again
killed the peasant women.
Next Lt. U. Get Screwed told his men
that "being a graduate of Michigan, I
am a humanitarian." As he was speaking,
Mr. Conglomerate attached puppet strings
to the lieutenant. The officer told his
men they were pulling out of Vietnam,
"whooppee!" and instead were going to
Laos, Thailand and Chile.
Back at the news conference, the Pres-
ident was awarding the silver star to a
flier who flew 192 missions over Cam-
bodia.
As Nixon addressed the assembled
group, several American soldiers attacked
a peasant woman and performed a very
convincing rape scene. The President, not
to be left out, came to join the fun.
Then everybody else got into the act-
including the decorated flier who bombed
the group. Finally she was shot down by
the Cambodian women..
Sounds for the presentation was pro-
vided by two trash can lids which, in
addition to attracting an audience, also
were helpful in adding realism to the
bombing scenes.

After finishing that performance, the
troupe marched to the Engineering Arch
where they performed before some 50 by-
standers.
They then returned to the Diag at 1
o'clock for the third and final perform-
ance which drew an audience of over 100.
The troupe, consisting mostly of mem-
bers of Gay Liberation, Women's Libera-
tion and SDS, said it had no definite
plans for the future.
A representative of Gay Lib, however,
revealed that plans were being made for
a Midwest Gay Liberation convention in
Ann Arbor this fall. He also detailed plans
for three state-wide Gay Lib conventions.
The meetings are to be held on three suc-
cessive Saturday's in July-one in Ann
Arbor and the other two in Lansing and
Detroit.
Several members of Gay Liberation
went to Chicago last weekend to partici-
pate in Gay Pride Week. Activities in the
Windy City included picketing at the
Playboy club and singing in front of a
YMCA.

Bomb hits D.C. b-

WASHINGTON ({P)-A bomb dam-
aged the Inter-American Defense
Board building here yesterday and
Revolutionary Force 7 later claimed
it did the bombing.
In a letter sent by special delivery
mail to the Associated Press, the
group said the board was bombed
"because it is an instrument of the
death kultur that rules America."
Similar bombings in New York re-
cently were followed by similar
letters.
The explosion did only slight dam-
age to the building here, principally
wrecking furniture in the chauffeur's
room and fixtures in an adjoining
bathroom. The pipe-type bomb was
thrown through a back door of the
building, a spokesman said.
The Inter-American Defense Board
is an agency of the Organization of
American States which is concerned
with mutual problems of hemisphere
nations, including defense.

The
Force
"OAm:

lette
7 clos
LOOK

The letter
hand in hani
of American
peoples in Ls
terest of Ame
"All throu
ple are on the
the letter sai
could not be
pressed natio
The OAS
rently meetir
foreign minis
of member no
"We can n
ciety where
while million
letter said. W
ciety which
millions to pr(

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