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July 01, 1970 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-01
Note:
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I 4 1 1

it

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, Jyly 1, 1970

Wednesday, July 1, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Study cites pollution
as cause of deaths

namme4CONCERT
SERIES

I

25 STATES:
NAACP announces ca
to integrate construct

--Associated Press

Back in the U.S.A.

NEW YORK (fi) - Air pol-
lution levels that are not un-
usually high, and increases in
pollution that may even pass
unnoticed, have been linked in
a new study with sharp increas-
es in deaths from heart a n d
respiratory diseases.
The study by Dr. Thomas A.
Hodgson Jr. of Cornell Medical
College concerned t h e deaths.
over a 2%/2-year period in New
York City, from November 1962,
to May 1965.
Hodgson criticized what he
called the apparent public aim
of setting air quality standards
only to make sure pollution lev-
els don't reach the extreme lev-
els t h a t caused disasters in
Donora, Pa., in 1948, in London
in 1952 and in New York in
1966.
"This is certainly creditable,"
he said, "however, deaths are
occurring when there a r e no
such episodes, when there are
slight and seemingly innocuous
increases in concentration from
day to day and month to
month."
Hodgson, an assistant profes-
sor of public health, said his
mathematical analysis shows
that it is possible to get esti-
mates of the deaths caused by
ordinary levels of air pollution
in New York City.
"Such estimates a r e essen-
tial," he said, "if society is to
cope with the problem of air
pollution and undertake a ra-
tional program of a i r pollu-
tion control."
Hodgson's s t u d y, reported
yesterday in the July issue of
Environmental S c i e n c e and
Technology, found sizable in-
creases in deaths paralleling

relatively slight increases in
levels of particulate matter in
the air.
An increase of one unit in the
average wdaily concentration of
particulate matter during a
month results in an increase of
more than 13 deaths each day
from respiratory and heart di-
seases for that month, the
study found.
An average increase of two
units from one month to an-
other is n o t unreasonable,
Hodgson said - meaning an in-
crease in the daily average of
26.7 deaths.
That figure would represent
an 18 per cent increase over the
average 150 heart and respira-
tory deaths per day, according
to the study.
ENDING TONIGHT
WINNER,
CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL
"SHOULD BE PLACED ON
A 'TEN BEST LIST OF
THE YEAR'!" -N..ost
RECOMMENDED BY THE NATIONAL
SOCIETY OF FILM CRITICS
ADAIE N
Bo Widerberg's Masterpiece!
His first picture since
'Elviro Madigan'

CINCINNATI, Ohio (/P)-- A
national campaign of mass
demonstrations to close down
p.u b 1 i c building construction
sites in an effort to force inte-
gration of unions and bring en-
forcement of federal hiring
guidelines was announced yes-
terday by civil rights leader
Herbert Hill.
Hill, NAACP labor director
told 3,000 delegates here at the
group's 61st annual convention
that picketing had begun Mon-
day at 10 sites in Columbus,
Ohio.
He said that picketing is
planned in Pittsburgh, Chicago,
Boston "and many other plac-
es in 25 states where public of-
ficials have failed to enforce
federally-ordered manning ta-
bles.
"They are the lawbreakers.
They are as guilty of breaking
the law as those w h o throw
firebombs during urban disor-
ders."
Hill accused the Nixon ad-
ministration of destroying the
Philadelphia plan for curbing
Job discrimination as "a payoff
to the building trades unions
for their support of the war in
Indochina."
Earlier, Roy Wilkins, NAACP
executive director, told the del-
egates that unity is necessary.
He called on young militants
to "cease the mean, meaning-
less sneering" and w o r k for
peaceful integration.
Wilkins praised the students
among the young militants for
attacking college admission pol-

Union di
campaign

icies and demanding increased
black enrollment, m o r e black
faculty members and black-
studies departments. But he
criticized students who demand
separation from white students
in classes, dormitories and ac-
tivities.
Wilkins also criticized racial-
separation plans by black mili-
tants as ",playing into the
hands" of white racists. He'said:
"They talk a complete apar-
theid except on one point; They
want white money. They preach

l
j
1

A crowd joins President Nixon yesterday to welcome Mrs. Nixon home from Lima, Peru at El Toro
Marine Base in San Clemente, California. Mrs. Nixon had been on a two-day, good-will visit to the
earthquake ravaged country.
AUGUST 4 PRIMARY
Stliwa on announces for
Dem nomination for House

TICKETS ON SALE BEGINNING JUNE 8
(Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12 A.M.) Phone 665-3717

NEW YORK (P) - The Sea-
farers International Un i o n
(SIU) and eight of its officers
and employes were indicted
Tuesday by a Brooklyn federal
grand Jury for alleged contribu-
tions to national political cam-
paigns of both Democrats and
Republicans in 1968.
The 17-count indictment, an-
nounced by Atty. Gen. J a h n
Mitchell, charged that the SIU
contributed $20,000 each to the
last congressional campaigns of
the GOP and to Hubert Hum-
phrey and h a d conspired to
contribute a total of $750,000
to political campaigns between
1964 and 1968.
Federal law bans direct po-

J

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Michael Stillwagon, an Ann
Arbor attorney, yesterday an-
nounced his candidacy for the
Democratic nomination for Con-
gress in Michigan's Second Con-
gressional District.
He will face another Democrat,
Bruce Neal, in the August 4
primary.The winner of the pri-
mary race will face incumbent
Republican Rep. Marvin Esch in
the November election.
"I am running for Congress
because I know that this coun-
try can do better. We do not
need to accept the current divi-
sions among our people; we can
make our system work," Still-
wagon said.

"We must recognize that pov-
erty, racism, environment, and
the war in Indochina are all
connected. Recent events at
Jackson State, Kent State and
Augusta have emphasized the
turmoil in America today. Much
of this turmoil comes from the
fact that we have been too long
engaged in a war which has
drained energy and money from
our pressing needs at home. For
too long we have let the young,
the poor and the black act as
our national conscience," he
said.
Stillwagon voiced his opposi-
tion to the use of unnecessary
force around the world at home.

"The involvement in the war
in Indochina is only one ex-
ample of our support of a series
of corrupt, unstable and undem-
ocratic governments around the
world. The use of force in Cam-
bodia, in violation of both inter-
national law and the United
States Constitution, has set the
stage for violence at home. I am
opposed to acts of violence by
local or national authorities
which are directed against dis-
senting individuals and groups
who are not breaking the law.
Officials must limit the use of
force to the minimum necessary
for the enforcement of existing
law," he said.

ANN- ARBOR
BLUES FESTIVAL
AUGUST 7-8-9

1
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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Wednesday, July 1
Day Calendar
Degree Recital: Metro Kozak, violin,
Sch. of Music Recital Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Degree Recital: Charles Veazey, oboe.
Sch. of Music Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Summer Piano Series Ushers: Anyone
who wants to sign up for Summer Pi-
ano Series please call Mr. Warner, 668-
8597. There are a few usher positions
still open.
Public Health Nursing: Students can
elect placement for clinical experienc-
es in pub. health nursing for Fall term.
Sign up Thurs., July 9, 8:30-10 a.m., &
1:30-3 p.m., 4108 Sch, of Nursing. Those
who now have clinical assignment in
a~m. must sign up in p.m. and vice
versa.
(Continued on Page 11)

ATE

ENDS TONIGHT!
"LET
IT
BE"
SHOWS: 1:15-3-5-7-9 P.M.

STARTS TOMORROW 0
TilE HAWJN5
y 4
TH M( I PRQCUCi1tOH tMM1 Mft" .sui. o
CHARLTON HESTON
A WALTER MIRISCHPODUCTION "THE HAWAIIANS"
PANAVISIO'COLORtbDey xi* Unid ists GQ

DOUBLE FEATURE-NOW SHOWING
"ANOTHER
TRU FFAUT
TRIUMPH !"
-JOSEPH GELMIS, Newsday
"It is the creation of a superior movie-
maker, played with marvelous style: I
liked it very much."
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. Times
THE BRIDE CAME JEAN-PAUL
AS ADVERTISED. BELMONDO
CATHERINE
DENEUVE
:{ r"MISSISSIPPI
MER D
;Screenpay and Directed by
COL.R by DeLuxe P
ALSO
MIRiSCH PICTURES presents
PICTURE!" I
Winne Of={
10 Acadmy fPAASION
Awards!-..Re- URseY
W. W ted Arigats
TODAY IS LADIES DAY
Ladies pay only 75c for matinees today
WED.-"West Side" at 2:25 and 6:45. "Mermaid" at 4:55 and 9:15
F IFTH M'IM
THUR.-"West Side"-6:45 .aIAUsUR
" rm d - **""WNW'" A ASON
"Mermaid"--9:15 I arrtoN 7.-. 7

Eves
6:25, 9:05

.1 s af..4 M/ 4. Ai

r

Z
0
C
- l

"'AI R PORT' is a great film all the way!"
-- Chicago Daily Nsws
A ROSS HUNTER Production
.- BURT LANCASTER - DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG - JACQUELINE BISSET -GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES " VAN HEFLIN - MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON - LLOYD NOLAN A"OM,''W
. DANA WYNTER -BARBARA HALE
Mon.-Thurs. Fri.-Sot. All Day
Eves. g Eves. ' Sunday
$2.25 $2.50 $2.25
-~~ Matinees Monday thru Saturday $1.75S

Matinees
1:00, 3:40

11

6p

mill III I III I I I I

i7 -fbtio- "-

I It

Friday, August 7, at 6:30 P.M.
Roosevelt Sykes
Bukka White
Mighty Joe Young
Jimmy Dawkins
John Lee Hooker
Howlin' Wolf

Saturday, Aug. 8, at noon
Harvey Hill
Lazy Bill Lucas
Juke Boy Bonner
Luther Allison
Albert King
Fred McDowell
Sat. Aug. 8, at 6:30 P.M.
Robert Pete Williams
Johnny Shines with
Sunnyland Slim
Johnny Young with
Walter Horton
Joe Turner with T-Bone
Walker & Eddie Vinson
Bobby Bland.
Advance Ticket Price
$10 SERIES TICKET
$2.50 FRIDAY NIGHT
$5.00 all day Saturday or
Sunday.

Sunday, August 9, at noon
John Jackson
Little Brother Montgomery
with Sippy Wallace
Cary Bell
Buddy Guy with
Junior Wells
Lonnie Johnson
Otis Rush
Sun., Aug. 9, at 6:30 P.M.
Mance Lipscomb
Little Joe Blue
Lowell Fulsome
Big Mama Thornton
Junior Parker
Son House
Tickets Now On Sale
Discount Records,
Student International
Records, University
Store or by Mail Order

Make check or Money Order for tickets payable to:
ANN ARBOR BLUES FESTIVAL
MtCHIGAN.UNION
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48104
PLEASE enclose self-addressed, stamped envelope
(only 15,000 tickets are available)
UAC-CANTERBURY HOUSE Production

SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE
Open Tuesday and Thursday, 10-1 a

t2o

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