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June 23, 1970 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-23
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4 I- U

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CA MPA ION

'70.

Tuesday, June 23, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 76Z
12 Noon Deadline Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

WeIh
By MARTIN HIRSCHMAN
AT THE END of the first week
in May, I received a three-
page telegram from Washington.
The authors, the telegram said,
shared my grief at the recent slay-
ings at Kent State, and shared
my outrage at the apparent ex-
tension of the war in Indochina.
They knew I deplored violence,
especially because-it could only
provoke reaction from the right.
They urged me to join with them
to help elect peace candidates in
the fall.
The telegram was signed by six
liberal senators including McGov-
ern, Hatfield and Cranston. I
crumbled it into my back pocket
and carried it around for two days
while I participated in the abor-
tive takeover of the ROTC build-
ing, then threw it out. dr
A day later I received a call
from liberal Democratic Mayor
Robert Harris, who said he was
probing the mood of the com-
munity. He wanted to know what
I thought of prospects for wide-
spread student interest in helping
to elect peace candidates in the.
fall.
I told him that there would un-
doubtedly be some interest, but
that he could count me out. Many
of us had played that game in
1968 and had learned that the
cards were all stacked against us.
And since then we had come to
realize a lot more about America
-enough to know that even if the
odds were even, elections are1
much too weak a tool to effect
massive reconstruction of society.
The good mayor obviously didn't1
see it my way. He suggested, in
effect, that if students didn't
spend their time working throught
electoral politics, they would turnt
to violence. He needled me withI
the possibility that the student
movement was being tooled by thek
Nixon administration into mili-
tant action that would send con-3
servatives streaming to the pollst
in November.,
This, I suppose was the mayor's
trump card. I told him rather
meekly that I was more interested
in attaining social justice than int
preventing disorder. After a fewc
more -rather subdued but uncom-
municative exchanges, we brokev
off.
WITH THOUSANDS of tele-s
grams and phone calls liker
these - in the cases where they
were somewhat better received -I
the Spirit of '68 was reborn, if not
fully rejuvenated, defying mostf
predictions and a good deal of theo
common sense.e

rave
Early indications appear to con-
firm the suspicion that students
will work no miracles at the polls
this fall. Of three primary races
recently spotlighted by the media
as student targets, for example,
the candidate with strong student
support was victorious in only one
-and this in the California con-
gressional district that includes
the leftist student community of
Berkeley and the Black Panther
home territory, Oakland.
And while the effectiveness of
students in bringing out the,
"peace" vote appears minimal, the
number of races providing an im-
pressive vehicle for such activity
is also small. Even in Ann Arbor,
where moderate Republican Rep.
Marvin Esch is, in any event, un-
beatable, the most promising can-
didate, Bruce Neal, is research
manager for Ford Motor Co.,
whose products are helping make
the Indochina war bigger and
better, and whose corporate re-
sponsibility is no more impressive
than that of big brother, General
Motors.
M ORE WORRISOME than its
lack of potential for achiev-
ing the short-term goal of ending
the war, hard-nosed electoral
politics are virtually useless as a
vehicle for long-range political
education. Democratization and
humanization of society - long
the avowed goals of many students
-are sold short in the brass band,
fanfare and election day canvas-
sing that make for a winning race.
But if the youth movement in
this country is to have significant
and lasting impact, it must force-
fully communicate what it has to
offer in the way of ideals and op-
tions for American society. Win-
ning elections is irrelevant, be-
cause electoral campaigns are
being won and lost on all the'
wrong issues. The strength of the
youth movement - if indeed it is
to be strong - will come in its
abilty to redefine the issues facing
America.
Just as Joseph Heller wrote
"Catch-22" with a view, not to
the war gone by, but the- war to
come, so too must left-wing polit-
ical activists direct themselves to-
ward more long-range goals. In
short-range terms, U.S. actions on
both the foreign and domestic
scenes are out of our control; we
must build for the future.
AMERICAN SOCIETY must be
reconstructed from its very
foundation, for, even leaving aside
our militarist and imperialist pres-
ence abroad, domestic problems

etter

th/ings

to

do

FOR RENT
The Ann Arbor Fair Housing Ordi-
nance and the University of Mich-
igan Regents' bylaws prohibit dis-
crimination in housing. Questions
should be directed to Off-Campus
Housing, 764-7400.
ON CAMPUS, singles for male grad
students or teaching fellows, clean,
very quiet, linens, no cooking. 723
Packard near State. 5035
AIR-CONDITIONED 1 BDRM, APTS.
Avail. Now. 761-2680
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
536 S. Forest
7C35
GARAGE, 723 Packard. 6C35
PHI ALPHA KAPPA, located one block
from the central campus, has rooms
for the summer and offers room and
board for the fall. For further infor-
mation contact, Ronald Dirkse, 1010
E. Ann. Ann Arbor. Phone 761-5491.
7CRF
summit
Associates
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL
761-8055
49Ctc

FOR RENT
EDINBURGH APTS., 912 Brown St. The
Royal Dutch Apts., 715 Church. The
King's Inn Apts., 1939 Dewey. Taking
applications for fall rental for all 3
locations. For rental informationcall
761-6156 or 761-3466. 4C41
2 AND 3 BDRM. TOWNHOUSES, $130-
150 per month, initial deposit $390,
chilren and pets welcome. Arbor Park,
located off Ellsworth Rd., west of
Platt. Taking applications for near
future occupancy. Management office
2990 S. State, 761-9026. 20C35
2 BDRM. furn. apt. $210 for '3 persons,
includes utilities, parking. 761-2939.
9Ctc
2 BDRM. TOWNHOUSES, $139 per mo.,
initial deposit $400. Children and pets
welcome. Arbor Manor, located on
2nd Ave., south of Michigan Ave.,
near Monroe, in Ypsi. Taking applica-
tions for near future occupancy.
Management office 2990 S. State, 761-
9026. 19035
AVAIL. FOR SUMMEt & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom,
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5.30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. llCtc
711 ARCH-Near State and Packard-
Modern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall. Dish,
washer, balcony, air-cond., and much
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Ctc
1 BDRM. furn. apt. $135 and $145 in-
cj.des utilities, parking, 1 yr. or 8
mo. lease. 761-2939. 8Ctc

FOR RENT
1 AND 2 BDRM., furn. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
2-BEDROOM furnished, quiet, close to
campus, parking. Mgr. 101-202. July-
Aug. $150/mo.-Fall 4-man, $290. 927
S. Forest, after 5 p.m. 662-6156. C35
MUSIC LOVER needed$for one bdrm.
apt. now or in fall. $120. William St.
above Bike Shop. Dbl. bed in back
room of new Community Record
Collection. Lots of music and people..
761-3690 or Anita at 761-0828. DC33
C AMPUS
NEW FURNISHED APARTMENT
FOR SUMMER OR FALL
at 543 CHURCH ST.
APT. 16
DAH LMAN N
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761-7600
38Ctc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY
(2 bdrm. unit-summer %/ term)
Campus area, cool, furnished apart-
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm.-ample park-
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt.
102, 721 5. Forest St. 16Ctc

FOR RENT
EAST University at Hill St.-1 BDRM.
Apt., $100. July 1. 769-7346. 2C35
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
DYNAMITE MODERN 2-man apartment.
1 block from campus. July-Aug. Must
lease-$100/mo. Call 769-6246 after 6
p.m. 49C33
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these modern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665-8825
loCtc
2-3 BDRM. TOWNHOUSES, $126-154 per
mo., initial deposit $360-420. Children
and pets welcome. Danbury Green,
located on McArthur Blvd., north of
Clark Road, Ypsi. Taking applications
for near future occupancy. Manage-
ment office 2990 S. State, 761-9026.
18C35

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Near
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threaten to destroy the country.
Human degradation and potential
disaster for our society lurk in
every.area of human activity.
RACE: Despite t e n years in
which the nation has focused at-
tention on this problem, the rela-
tive position of the black man in
white America remains virtually
unchanged. In the 1960's, the ele-
vated expectations of the black
people lead to rather anarchic up-
risings in the nation's ghettoes.
Violence of this sort is likely to
continue, but the brutal repres-
sion which it has provoked has
lead the black man toward more
organized activity. Racial hatred
is growing among both whites and
blacks, and America seems to be
moving almost inexorably toward
civil war. More whites must be
ready to offer their support to the
black people. Perhaps this sup-
port can be most effective, if the
whites attempt to expose racism
in the society, and to convince
other whites that it is wrong.
Already the racist repression of
the Black Panthers has shaken
the myth that American justice'
extends to the black man.
HUNGER: Thousands of Amer-
icans in the slums, in Appalachia;
and in the South are starving,
while -the government pays bil-;
lions to farmers rich and poor,
alike, so that they will not grow,
too much. The problem is not a,
food shortage, but the now char-
acteristic unwillingness of Ameri,-
ca to recognize the right of hu-
man beings to a subsistence exist-,
ence simply because they are hu-
man beings.

pollutants makes the automobile
a vehicle of death for our so-
ciety. But the massive influence
of the auto industry renders un-~
likely the development of efficient
systems of mass transit to replace
widespread auto use.
THE ENVIRONMENT: Moti-
vated only by their own financial
well-being, industries are ravag-
ing the countryside, over heating
and de-oxidizing our waterways
and making our air unbreathable.-
Ecological disasters of horrifying
magnitude- a r e likely to occur
with increasing frequency _in the
coming years. Corporate avarice
is threatening to make the planet
unlivable, y e t industry remains
virtually unchecked.
AND SO ON. As the list of prob-
lems continue, their interrela-
tion becomes m o r e pronounced.
For example, the problem of our
overcrowded cities is related to
the lack of equitable income dis-
tribution, the lack of public mass
transit, the health situation, rac-
ism and the destruction of the en-
vironment. Poor education is di-
rectly related to racism, the prob-
lem of the cities and to hunger.
(A prominent educator recently
announced a new finding, which,
while answering certain racist as-
sumptions made by many Ameri-
cans, is strikingly obvious: Chil-
dren who go through each school
day distracted by hunger do not
learn well.' Similarly, the problem
of inadequate housing is insep-
arable from the questions of in-
come distribution, racism, a n d
transportation.
The cyclical nature of the prob-
lems confronting American so-
ciety suggest t he, overwhelming
impression that the Machine has
broken down. But just the oppo-
site is true: The Machine that is
American political, social and eco-
no iic existence is working per-
fectly - just as it is supposed to.,
Sensitivity to the needs of the
people is not the prime moving
force behind the American Ma-
chine, but rather the Puritan eth-
ic of diligent work, and the social

Darwinist concept of cut-throat
competition. All the social legis-
lation of the twentieth century
has only camaflouged these basic
attributes of our society.
One of the m o s t important
characteristics of t h e American
Machine is its ability to co-opt
hesitant participants. To t h o s e
who conform and follow its code
of behaviour, the Machine prom-
ises great material and psycholo-
gical reward. Those who reject its
advances are condemned to share
the condition of those the Ma-
chine does not need - the black,
the unskilled and the aged.
BECAUSE OF THE strength of
this power, it is the Machine
the American system, that has de-
fined our society. Man has lost his
ability to control society, because
he is himself under the thumb of
this repressive, impersonal slave
driver..
Centered as it is in the econom-
ic system of the nation, the Amer-
ican Machine is essentially im-
pervious to attack from the gov-
ernment, simply because so much
of government is either controlled
by industrial interests, or run by
men who, as products of the Ma-
chine themselves, share those in-
terests. Therein lies the ultimate
answer to those who seek change
through electoral means: govern-
ment is only part of the Machine,
and a rather vestigial part at that.
For those seeking to reconstruct
American society, then, the target
is clear. Tactics are another ques-
tion. Clearly we cannot fall into
the trap of attempting to change
the system from within, for it is
precisely those inside over whom
the Machine has the greatest con-
trol.
The alternatives, however, re-
main largely unexplored. The Ma-
chine must be smashed and re-
placed with a new, humanitarian
system. But the means and even
the end remain ill-defined. Our
only sure guide is that we must be
faithful to our new value system,
and build our o w n institutions
based on these values.

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(MANY AT EVEN GREATER REDUCTIONS)

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HEALTH CARE: While medical
technology strives toward new
sophistication, millions of Amer-
icans are denied care for easily
treatable illnesses because t h e y
cannot afford to pay. And-as most
individual doctors price them-
selves out of the range of those
with low incomes, the powerful.
American Medical Association is
making every, effort to prevent
government interference. For ex-
ample, the AMA recently quashed
the appointment of- Dr. J o h n
Knowles to the nation's top health
post because of his outspoken ad-
vocacy of more equitable distribu.
tion of health care. All indica-
tions are that the present situa-
tion will only worsen: the cost of
medical care is skyrocketing.
TRANSPORTATION: T h o u s-
ands of Americans are maimed
or killed on the nation's highways
each year, but startling revela-
tions about the dangerousness of
the automobile have lead only to
token gestures by the auto indus-
try - seat belts, shoulder harn-
esses and head rests - and even
these were forced by government
action and are paid for by the
consumer. Add to its lack of safe-

ON

ALL

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AND

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r
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420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich:
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials 'Printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.
TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 1970 News Phone: 764-0552

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