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June 23, 1970 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

T,
Tuesday, June 23, 1 970

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IV

Page Eight

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M4- C

*...VS
! FBy The Associated Press
CHICAGO - The New York
Mets rallied twice on homers--
y, one by Tommie Agee in the
fifth inning and a three-run tie
breaker by pinchhitter Donn
Clendenon in the eighth to over-
,,, power the Chicago Cubs 9-5
yesterday,
Agee's ninth June homer pow-
ered a four-run uprising and
Clendenon's seventh of the-sea-
son wrapped up a three-run
spurt.
Fergie Jenkins, whose five-
game winning streak and 21 1-3
scoreless inning string ended,
had held the Mets hitless and
allowed only one on base-when
he hit Cleon Jones in the first
inning - until one out in the
fifth.
HOUSTON - Don Wilson,
troubled by a sore shoulder
most of the season, fired a
three-hitter and retired 20 con-
secutive batters as the Houston
head coplets adarng freh:nd Astros downed San Diego 4-1.
head) completes a darin Aohawnd The tall right-hander allowed
te first round of the Wimbledon Lawn a homer to Clarence Gaston in
England. Ashe defeated his British op- the first inning and a one-out
.o move into the second round. single to Larry Stahl in the sec-
SERVING TH E PEOPLE

ond. Stahl was thrown out steal-
ing and Wilson retired every
San Diego batter until pinch hit-
ter Al Ferrara singled with one
out in the ninth.
John Edwards drove in the
tying run against loser Dave
Roberts, 5-4, in the second with
single following hits by Bob
Watson and Marty Martinez.
The Astros went ahead in the
fourth on Watson's single and
Edwards' double.
Singles by Denis Menke, Wat-
son and Martinez accounted for
apeal
deied
WASHINGTON (P)-The Su-
preme Court declined 8 to 0
yesterday to give former neavy-
weight champion Cassius Clay
permission to go to Canada to
fight Joe Frazier, his successor.
The plea, made by Clay's law-
yers and publicly disavowed by
the former champion, had been
denied June 10 by Justice Hugo
L. Black.
Clay was convicted three years
ago of refusing induction into
the Army. He is free on bail
while appealing, but one condi-
tion is that he not travel aut-
side the United States.

Cubs
another run in the sixth, and
Joe Morgan hit his second home
run of the season in the seventh.
ATLANTA-Wes Parker, Bill
Sudakis and Bill Grabarkerwitz
socked home runs last night as
Los Angeles trimmed Atlanta 4-2
and moved into second place in
the National League West Divi-
sion one-half game ahead of the
Braves.
Right-hander Alan Foster, 4-
7, logged his third victory of the
year over Atlanta, withWlast-out
help from Jim Brewer.
Parker hit his sixth homer in
the fourth inning to draw the
Dodgers even at 1-1. Then Su-
dakis belted his fifth homer in
the fifth after Tom Haller had
singled, and Grabarkerwitz led
off the eighth with his seventh
homer.
gTAT
Now Showing !

Vol. LXXX, No. 34-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Tuesday, June 23, 1970 Ten CE

IXO

SI'G
TO

S

BILL

C

B

LLOT

18-YE

R

ARTHUR ASHE (missing
reverse spin slice during th
Tennis Championships in E
ponent 6-3, 6-2 and 6-1 t

Laver, Asile win in Wimbledon

I.
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WIMBELDON, England (/) -
Rod Laver of Australia and
Arthur Ashe of Richmond, Va.,
led a procession of seeded play-
ers through the first round of
the Wimbledon Tennis Cham-
pionships yesterday as both the
Australia and U.S. contingents
came through without incident.
Laver, a nonpareil redhead
from Australia who is seeking
his third title in succession and
his fifth altogether, took just
one hour for a 6-2, 6-0, 6-2 romp
over George "Butch" Seewagen
of Bayside, N.Y.
Ashe, rated by many as Lav-
er's chief threat, opened his bid
by downing Graham Stilwell of
Britain 6-3, 6-2, 6-1. Stan Smith
of Los Angeles, the U.S. No. 1
and the seventh seed here, also
advanced, but had difficulty be-
fore subducing Jaime Fillol of
Chile 7-5, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Clark Grabner, the ninth seed
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

from New York, also needed
four sets before defeating Har-
ald Elsenbroich of West Ger-
many 6-3, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1, but
Dennis Ralston of Barkesfield,
Calif., advanced without swing-
ing his racket when Nicola Pie-
trangeli of Italy scratched.
The Australians, with five
seeds, had even less trouble.
Rio soccer
celebration
kills 44
RIO DE JANEIRO )(A)--Te
joyous celebrations of Brazil's
World Cup soccer victory over
Italy in Mexico left toll of at
least 44 dead in Rio alone.
Although police and hospitals
did not initially report an ex-
traordinary number of accidents
Sunday night, official informa-
tion issued later said 1,800 per-
sons were treated ,in the four
main public hospitals of Rio
between midnight Sunday and
noon yesterday.

Laver, inevitably the top seed
showed the way against Seewa
gen while John Newcombe, sec
ond seed and last year's runner
up, was the victor in anothe.
Australia-U.S. battle when h
defeated Roy Barth, of Say
Diego, Calif., 6-2, 6-3, 6-4.
Roy Emerson, the 10th seed
and like Laver and Nemcombe
former winner here, had ar
equally easy passage over Ana-
toly Volkov of Russia 6-4, 6-3
6-0 while Ken Rosewall, the
veteran Aussie who was tiwee
finalist in the 1950's and who i
seeded fifth this year, beat fel-
low countryman Charles Dible3
6-3, 7-5, 6-4.

U.S. widens
air strikes
WASHINGTON (P) - U.S. warplanes
are playing a wider role in the Indochina
war, striking as deep as 100 miles inside
Cambodia against new communist troop
and supply lines, the Pentagon disclosed
yesterday.
These new raids - well beyond the 21.7
mile limit for U.S. ground troops - be-
gan about a week ago and are being
carried out with the "careful and per-
sonal coordination" of Cambodian a n d
South Vietnamese military officials, a
Pentagon spokesman said.
The spokesman, Jerry W. Friedheim,
said they have been on an almost daily
basis depending on the weather.
Friedheim said the bombing runs were
begun "in the last week" when it became
clear communist forces had successfully
re-established their supply lines further
west of the sanctuary areas along the
South Vietnamese border.
These air interdiction raids, as Fried-
heim described them, have been against
North Vietnamese troop and supply lines
mostly a1o n g Cambodia's river system.
They have not been in support of allied
ground operations, he said.

e
a1
n
e

I

July 4
CAMP-OUT RACE-IN
Spend Friday night July 3 under
the stars in the scenic Irish
Hills and wake up Saturday to
the biggest names in auto rac-
ing. Andretti, Foyt, and Unser
lead the pack at the "Michigan
Twin 200's." Special student
rate $4.50, available at the
track or call 971 -4210 for
further information.

-ait-oavi - mx
Rally, march set for tonight
About 30 members of various radical campus groups march around the Univer-
sity telling students of plans for a protest tonight against the widening of U.S.
air strikes in Cambodia. A march and a rally are tentatively set to begin at the
corner of South and East University Avenues at a time to be announced.

WAS
yesterc
ing age
test on
The
the 196
nearly
been re
The
courts
viding
year-o
not be
In
knocke
ahead
the sta
lower
Presii
ment
be poss
ly so t
nectior
congres
be uph
The
court
validity
test by
registry
The
election
beginn:
who a
extend
million
Nixor
voting
position
a consi
by stat
He b
1965 V
only to
so that
country
The
recomn
literac3
and fo
require
election
The
tests a
registry
ana, M1
ia and

WELCOME
STUDENTS!
Let us style your hair to fit
your personality..
i 8 BARBERS, no waiting
t OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Arborland-Campus
Maple Village

MAY AFFECT LSA CONVICTIONS

Con tent(ion statute

ITECH"iCOLOR"UN UnMM rists
OM SOWS AT:

I

Baltimore
New York
Detroit
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota
California
Oakland
Kansas City
Chicago
Milwaukee

W
44
40
33
30
29
29
West
40
37 R
37
23 4
24 ?
21 t

L
23
26
30
:33
34
37
21
27
30
40
42
44

Pet.
.658
.606
.524
.478
.460
.439
.655
.578
.552
.365
.364
.322

B
3i/z
9
12
13
14%
6
1$
21

I

t..

Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 9, Boston 8
Kansas City at Oakland, ine.
Minnesota 4, Milwaukee 3
Other clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
Detroit at Washington, night
Kansas City at Oakland, night
Chicago at California, night
Minnesota at Milwaukee, night
Baltimore at Boston, night
Only games scheduled
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East
W L Pct. GB
Chicago 35 29 .548 -
New York 34 31 .524 114
Pittsburgh 34 35 .494 3Y2
St. Louis 32 33 .493 3%
Philadelphia 30 34 .474 5
Montreal 24 42 .364 12
West
Cincinnati 48 20 .711 -
Los Angeles 38 30 .556 10
Atlanta 36 29 .552 10'.4
San Francisco 31 36 .461 161
Houston 29 40 .420 19'
San Diego 30 40 .413 20
Yesterday's Results
New York 9, Chicago 5
Philadelphia 6, 3, Montreal 0. 2
St. Louis 6, 0, Pittsburgh 1. 1
Los Angeles 4, Atlanta 2
Houston 4, San Diego 1
Cincinnati 13, San Francisco 6
Today's Games
Montrealat Philadelphia, night
New York at Chicago
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, night
Los Angeles at Atlanta, night
San Francisco at Cincinnati, night
San Diego at Houston, night

BARBER
BILLIARDS
BOWLING
MUG
STAND

MICHIGAN
UNION
OPEN REGULAR
HOURS DURING
BREAK

Friday & Saturday-8 P.M.
"COME TOGETHER"
or
"THE PLASTIC MOJO BANDAID
TALKING BLUES"
An original play by Jon SIade

..r

By EDWARD ZIMMERMAN
Daily News Analysis.
A federal court opinion handed down
May 29 may have a dramatic effect on
the 107 students who were arrested and
charged with contention in the LSA sit-
in last September.
A three-judge panel in Detroit ordered
a change in the wording of the state con-
tention statute to assure the law's con-
stitutionality.
It is possible that because of this new
ruling that the convictions of most of
those arrested in the LSA sit-in and the
General Electric recruiter clash last Feb-
ruary could have their convictions re-
viewed again or over-ruled.
If such a situation occurred, it would
be up to the county prosecutor to decide
whether he wants to re-arrest those
charged with contention under the old
statute and charge them under the re-
vised law.
In the LSA incident, students took con-
trol of the building to protest the refusal
of President Robben Fleming and the
Regents to reconsider the structuring of
a University discount bookstore.
State and local police and Washtenaw
County sheriff's deputies rushed the
building in the early morning, arresting
and hauling off in buses-107 people who
stayed in the LSA Bldg.
The contention statute previously read,
"No person shall-create or excite a dis-
turbance or a contention ..
The three federal judges, George Ed-
wards, Thomas Thornton and Fred
Kaess, ruled that the words "excite" and
"contention" should be deleted from the
statute.

They felt the words had to be deleted
in order for the statute to remain con-
stitutional, one of the judges said. He de-
clined to give further details about the
reasoning behind the decision.
The case which brought about the
change in the wording of the statute was
based on an incident which occurred last
fall in Detroit. Thirty welfare mothers
gathered in front of a welfare office pro-
testing what they said were low alloca-
tions for their children's school clothing.
They were arrested for interfering with

th reised
the business of the welfare office. The
case was cited as Detroit Metropolitan
Welfare Rights Organization et al vs.
Wayne County Prosecutor William Ca-
halan, the man who ordered the arrests.
The lawyers who handled the case be-
fore the three-judge panel were Robert
Bartell and Allen Houseman.
Although the ruling on the wording
of the statute has come down, the decis-
ion as to the guilt or innocence of
the welfare mothers still has not been
reached.

i

Eves
6:25, 9:05

r,1- r W - k1
$ ctirA alng

NOW
SHOWING

Matinees
1:00, 3:40

NGCGTHEATRE CORPORATION M-Thur. 8:15 oniy
A NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY Fri. 6:30. 10:00
Sat. 1:30, 5:30,
FOH 9:30
FO VILLE . 1:00, 4:30,
375 No. MAPLE RD.-7691300 8:15

I-
z
0

"'A I R PORT' is a great film all the way!"
-ChicagQ o iy Newt
A ROSS HUNTER Production
BURT LANCASTER -DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG - JACQUELINE BISSET -CEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN - MAUREEN STAPLETON
- BARRY NELSON -LLOYD NOLAN A u rl iCTi *V I
DANA WYNTER BARBARA HALE0
Mon.-Thurs. Fri.-Sat . All Dav
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$2.25 $2.50 $2.25
Matinees Monday thru Saturday $1.75

a wadleigh-maurice, Itd. production
technicolor@ from warner bros.
PASS LIST SUSPENDED

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