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June 20, 1970 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Satiirdnav.lJune 20.1970

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Tigers;

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Baltimore sweeps pair

By-The Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Cleveland
swept to its sixth straight
victory behind Sam McDo-
well's f o u r- h i t pitching,
downing D e t r o i t 4-2 last
night.
McDowell, 9-4, struck out five
and walked four but was helped
by three double plays.
Eddie Leon's two-run single
in the fifth off Detroit starter
Mickey Lolich, 6-7, put the In-
dians ahead 3-2 and Graig Net-
tles' RBI single in the sixth gave
McDowell an insurance run.
The Tigers got solo homers
from Mickey Stanley and Jim
Northrup.
Orioles rebound
BALTIMORE-The Baltimore
Orioles outlasted Washington
12-10 in the first game despite
eight RBI's by Mike Epstein
and then completed a sweep of
last night's twi-nighter by win-
ning the nightcap 3-2 on Merv
Rettenmund's two-out single in
the thirteenth inning.
Dave Johnson doubled to lead
off the 13th after Darold Know-
les had pitched five hitless in-
nings in relief of Casey Cox.
After Mark Belanger was pur-
posely passed, pinch-hitter Curt
Motton popped out attempting
to bunt and Don Buford also
popped up before Rettenmund
slashed his game-winning hit
up the middle.
* *. *
Cubs clipped
CHICAGO - Ted Simmons'
two-run single with the bases
loaded and two out gave the
St. Louis Cardinals a 5-3 vic-
tory over the Chicago Cubs in
17 innings yesterday.
Lou Brock led off the 17th for
the Cards with an infield hit
and moved upon a sacrifice.
Richie Allen was purposely
walked and Mike Shannon filed
out, but Jose Cardenal walked
to load the bases. Then Sim-
mons singled over Paul Popo-
vich's head at second base.
Good Grief!
The Cleveland Indians have
added a new dimension to the
game of baseball. The Indians,
plagued by low attendance,
have declared that their double-
header against Detroit Sunday
will be theExpectant Mothers
The old ball game just isn't
what it used to be.

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Vol. LXXX, No. 33-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Saturday, June 20. 1970 Ten Cents

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-Associated Press
Carl Yastrzemski steals third against Yanks
Freehan vote total tops in
AL All-Star balloting

--Assocated Press
uip, up, and away
San Diego State's Arnie Robinson stretches for all he's worth to
long jump 25-10 in action at NCAA track and field championships
in Des Moines. Brown's efforts were well rewarded as this leap
gave him a first place finish.
PLA YERS DISPUTE
NFL refutes chiarges
DALLAS uP-Tex Schranm. chairman of the National Foot-
ball League owners negotiating committee, said yesterday the
group had bargained in good faith with the players and was avail-
able for talks despite the breakdown of formal negotiations.
The breakdawn was revealed Thursday when the NFL Play-
ers Association issued a statement saying it had filed an unfair
labor practices charge against the owners with the National Labor
Relations Board in Minneapolis.
The breakdown came over two issues-a threat to the powers
of Commissioner Pete Rozelle and the subject of pre-season pay.
"We have attempted to bargain in good faith with the play-
ers association," said Schramm, "and we feel the players associ-
ation has been bargaining in good faith. But both sides apparently
feel strongly on the two issues in question.
The players association has asked the NLRB for certification
as the bargaining agent for the some 1,300 NFL players. At the
same time they have asked that the NLRB define Rozelle as an
employer, which the owners contend would reduce his powers.

NEW YORK A)} - The big
battles for starting berths on
the American League All-Star
team are between Rico Petro-
celli of Boston and Luis Aparicio
of the Chicago White Sox for
shortstop and Harmon Kille-
brew of Minnesota and Brooks
Robinson of Baltimore for third
base.
Bill Freehan, hard-hitting De-
troit catcher, was the biggest
vote-getter in the first weekly
release of the fan vote for the
41st baseball classic that will
be played July 14 at Cincinnati's
new Riverfront Stadium.
But the most interesting re-
turns centeredaround the close
balloting at shortstop and third
base.
At short, Petrocelli drew 131,-
894 votes to 124,289 for Apari-
cio. At third, Killebrew was
named on 185,505 ballots to
174,494 for Robinson.
Freehan drew 265,258 votes on
the 491,548 ballots cast so far in
the first fan voting since 1957.
Boog Powell, Baltimore's slug-
ging first baseman, was the run-
ner-up with 255,515 votes.
The other leaders are Rod

Carew of Minnesota at second
base and Frank Robinson of
Baltimore, Frank Howard of
Washington and Carl Yastrzem-
ski of Boston in the outfield.
The National League's leaders
were Johnny Bench of Cincin-
ati at catcher, Willie McCovey
of San Francisco at first, Glenn
Beckert of Chicago at second,
Tony Perez of Cincinnati at
third, Don Kessinger of Chicago
at short and outfielders Henry
Aaron and Rico Carty of Atlanta
and Willie Mays of San Fran-
cisco.
{Y Major Leagueh
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

To the
victor ..
Edward Heath, the new British
prime minister, waves to cheer-
ing crowds as he arrives at Con-
servative party headquarters in
London's Smith Square yester-
day following the defeat of the-
Labor Party in the general elec-
tion. (See story, Page 7).
-Associated Press

SUMMER ONLY

Baltimore
New York
Detroit
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota
xCalifornia
Oakland
Chicago
Kansas City
xMilwaukee
x--late game

W L Pct. GB
41 23 .641 -
38 26 .594 3
31 29 .517 8
30 30 .500 9
28 32 .467 11
29 35 .453 12
West
38 20 .655 -
35 26 .574 41/
34 30 .531 7
24 39 .381 16%
22 39 .361 17%
20 41 .328 19/
not included

'U' offers child care faciltties

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WORLD CUP CLIMAX SUNDAY

Mexico braces for soccer final

Yesterday's Results
Cleveland 4, Detroit 2
Boston 7, New York 4
Baltimore 12, Washington 10, 1st
Baltimore 3, Washington 2, 2nd,
13 inn.
Chicago 4, Oakland 2
Kansas City 5, Minnesota 1
Milwaukee at California, inc.
Today's Games
Detroit at 'Cleveland, day
Chicago at Oakland, day
IMilwaukee at California
Minnesota at Kansas City
Washington at Baltimore
New York at Boston
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

MEXICO CITY {AP) - Sport's greatest
tournament b u 11 t yesterday toward its
climatic match as Brazil and Italy-a pair
of teams up from disgrace-prepared for
their match tomorrow to decide the World
Soccer Championship.
Germany and Uruguay, who lost excit-
ing semifinal matches, meet today for
third and fourth places in the ninth tour-
nament for the Jules Rimet Cup.
Betting odds in Mexico favor Brazil, but
Italy put on a magnificent exhibition of
football Wednesday to defeat Germany in
overtime, 4-3, and prove that the old
Italian class has returned.
The Germany-Uruguay match is an an-
ticlimax in this spectacle that started May
31 with 16 of the world's best national soc-
cer teams dreaming of riches and glory
which await the winner of this tourna-
ment to decide the champion of the world's
most popular sport.
The tournament, through its first 30
games, was one for the record books. There
were more overtime periods, more goals and

fewer fights than ever before. Normally a
tournament which builds so much na-
tionalism and involves so much money for
individual' players leads to heated tempers
on the field.
There have been a basket full of scan-
dals off the field, however, which ranged
from the arrest in Colombia of the captain
of the defending world champions to a
rumor that Italy would be disqualified
from the final for using illegal stimulants.
Bobby Moore, captain of the English
team, was cleared of a charge that he
shoplifted a $1,900 bracelet while the team
was in Bogota for a warmup match against
the Colombian national team.
Officials of the International Football
Federation (FIFA) cleared the Italian play-
ers of any wrongdoing after the results
were in from urine tests. .
The Jules Rimet Cup, donated and
named for the late president of FIFA, will
be retired after Sunday's game because
both Italy and Brazil have won it twice
before...s

Along the wayside toward the finals lay
strewn the hopes of England to defend
the championship it won in 1966, Uruguay's
hopes of becoming a three-time winner and
Germany's hopes of taking the trophy to
Munich where the 1974 tournament will
be held.
England was one of the strong favorites.
Many predicted a Brazil-England final.
But the English lost to Germany in a
quarter-finals match and immediately the
criticism poured upon the head of coach
Alf Ramsey, knighted in 1966 by Queen
Elizabeth II for giving England its first
World Cup championship.
Brazil, with its world famous Pele, the
king of soccer, and Italy both know how
the English feel. Br azil was defending
champion for the 1966 tournament but got
knocked out in the opening rounds.
Italy's players had to have police pro-
tection when they went home in disgrace
that year after being knocked out by un-
known North Korea.

By HESTER PULLING
After conducting the Child Care Action
Group on a tour of open facilities in three
University residence halls, University of-
ficials yesterday offered the group any
one of them for a summer child-care
center.
The group, was shown dining rooms in
Mosher-Jordan and Mary Markley resi-
dence halls and a combination dining
room-living room complex at Oxford
Housing, by John Feldkamp, director of
University housing and Paul Bowyer,
supervisor of building services. It will
make a decision next week on which
facilities to use.
Later in the day, at the close of the
Regents meeting, the child care group
presented petitions to President, Robben
Fleming urging that the University pro-
vide permanent University facilities for
a center.
In addition to the petitions, the group
presented a statement to Fleming thank-
ing him for his help in-establishing the
rent-free surpmer facilities, and also
"strongly requested that a more per-
manent facility be found" to continue the
program'on into the fall.
"I do want to help you," Fleming told
the group, and mentioned that money
and .facility problems might hinder con-
tinuing the program for more than the
summer.
The University would provide rent free
space and use of equipment already in
the building, but the child care group
would have to cover cleaning and staff
costs on their own.
Child care became an issue last March

when the group attempted,, to present
demands to Fleming asking for free child
care facilities which the University would
finance.
Because Fleming was in a meeting at
the time, the group talked with Barbara
Newell, acting vice president of student
affairs, who disclosed that she had re-
quested space for a child care center at
the University School.
Later in April, the group met with
Fleming and he set up a study committee

of people from the child care group and
from the administration and faculty.
Last month the proposal for a summer
child care center at University School
was turned down due to building renova-
tions. The group, in an effort to gain
wider recognition and more support, held
the petition drive on the Diag-where
they collected over 650 signatures--and
also contacted Feldkamp about the pos-
sibility of a summer center in empty
dormitory rooms.

Chicago
New York
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
Cincinnati
Atlanta
Los Angeles
San Francisco
San Diego
Houston

W L
34 25
32 30
32 33
29 31
27 34
23 39"
West
45 19
35 27
36 28
29 35
30 39
27 39

Pet.
.576
.516
.4892
.483
.443
.371
.703
.565
.563
.453
.435
.409

GB
3%
5
8
12%
9
9
16
17Y2
19

Yesterday's Results
Pittsburgh 8, Montreal 4
New York 13, Philadelphia 3
St. Louis 5, Chicago 3, 17 Inn.,
Atlanta 7, Houston 6, 1st
Atlanta 4, Houston 2, 2nd
Los Angeles 6, Cincinnati 1
San Diego 6, San Francisco 3
Today's Games
Philadelphia at New York
St. Louis at Chicago, day
Montreal at Pittsburgh, day
Houston at Atlanta
Los Angeles at Cincinnati, day
San Francisco at San Diego

.. .. ... ......

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