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June 18, 1970 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1970-06-18
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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, June 18, 1970

Thursday, June 18, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

b.. y -

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

ARMY OVERKILL':
Reversal of mutiny conviction

'50 baby boom

'70 college s

KING HUSSEIN yesterday blamed Jordan's foreign "en-
emies" for last week's bloody fighting between Jordanian troops
and Arab guerrillas.
He said the situation was now calm but Jordan still faces a
period of crisis.
Hussein told a news conference in Amman the fighting was the
most anxious and difficult time of his life.
"We are unable to say exactly who was behind it but it is ob-
vious that our enemies played a big part in it for their own benefit,"
Hussein added.
* * *
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE Melvin Laird yesterday said the
U.S. Pacific fleet will move to the Arabian Sea once American
vessels are relieved of duty in Indochina.
Laird said the fleet will act to offset what he termed Soviet
naval power between the RedSea and the Indian Ocean. The secre-
tary made his remarks aboard the USS Franklin Roosevelt off the
coast of Italy.
STATE LOCAL DRAFT BOARDS will order some 1,670
registrants for induction into the army during July, State Se-
lective Service Director Arthur Holmes said yesterday.
Holmes said it is expected the July call will reflect the induction
of an increasing number of colege students who were graduated dur-
ing the spring months.
Local boards now are applying new regulations prohibiting the
granting of new fatherhood and occupational deferments afters
April 23.
* * *
BRITIAN'S ELECTION CAMPAIGN ended yesterday night
with a furious exchange over the future of the pound of sterling.
And Prime Minister arold Wilson was hit by his 24th egg as he
wound up his bid for re-election.
Wilson's Labor party struck back at Conservative Leader Edward
Heath's contention that a Labor majority in the next Parliament
would bring another devaluation of the nation's currency. But Heath,
in a final thrust for power, stood by his claim although he injected
new qualifications into it.
Public opinion polls issued the night before the election con-
tinued to give Labor the edge, but by a variety of margins. Gallup
predicted a seven per cent margin, compared with its estimate of
2.4 per cent four days ago.
ELIZABETH KOONTZ, director of the U.S. Labor Depart-
ment's Women's Bureau, said yesterday her bureau is well aware
of discrimination against women because the U.S. government is
one of those guilty of it.
"Women train guys at the beginning level who shoot past them
at the three-year level," Mrs. Koontz told an equal opportunity con-
ference on the 50th anniversary of the bureau's founding.
Mrs. Koontz said women are "counseled to go into routine jobs,"
face quota systems against them in graduate schools, and pay taxes'
to provide "scholarships that women don't get."
d i
the sicilian clan
"There's nothing like a juicy how-they-dunit. THE SICILIAN
CLAN has just about everything a crime-and-detection de-
votee can want-a glamorous young criminal, a saga old
family-man as mastermind, the international machinations of j
the Mafia, a multi-million dollar jewel theft, the most inspired I
hijacking of a planeload of passengers and jewels in or out j
of fiction, a dash of sex, a sensible and far-from-stupid de-
tective and a variety of non-bumbling police forces, and a I
triple denouement finale. It adds up to an enthralling how-
they-dunit, immaculately detailed and beautifully performed
every step of the way, with the police hot on the heels of the
mob (and on occasion even a step or two ahead). And it boils
down to a fast-paced in-depth thriller that blends characteri-
zation with the action to provide a most satisfying entertain-
ment."
-NEW YORK MAGAZINE
A- :SICLIN
20th Century-Fox Presents A HENRI VERNEUL-IACQUES E. STRAUSS PRODUCTION
Starring JEAN GABIN
ALAINQDELON] I UNO VENTURA 1G

PiPT PTHUM U S.=-7:;00and 9 :0
NFPMTI N 2lT a" SAT -2:40, 4:50, 7 :00,

in Presidh
SAN FRANCISCO (P)- Re-
versal of a private's mutiny con-
viction in a 27-m a n Presidio
stockade demonstration could
clear others convicted in the
case, a defense attorney s a i d
yesterday.
"I am confident that the
Court of Military Review's de-
cision in Nesrey Sood s c a s e
will stand as a ruling for all the
men," attorney Paul Halvonik
said.
In Washington, the Army
said it will not appeal the Sood
ruling. "It was a classic case
of Army overkill," said Halvo-
nik, an 'American Civil Liber-
ties Union lawyer.-
"The review court ruled, in
effect, that no mutiny had tak-_
en place. So what are the other
men doing in prison?"
Sood, originally sentenced to;
15 years at hard labor, joined
26 other stockade prisoners in;
a singing sitdown protest Oct.
28, 1968.

Dcase may
They sang "We Shall Over-
come" and "America The Beau-
tiful" in protest against what
they described as crowded con-
ditions in the prisoni and the
fatal shooting of a fellow pris-
oner four days earlier in an es-
cape attempt.
Twenty-two were convicted of
mutiny charges. Three escaped
and are believed to be in Can-
ada. Two were convicted of les-
ser charges.
Halvonik and Sood said they
will seek reversal of the review
court's order that Sood should
stand convicted of t h e lesser
charge of "willful disobedience
of a lawful command" to cease
singing and return to barracks.
" Sood's original 15-year sen-
tence had been reduced earlier
to two years by the Army judge
advocate general. He was pa-
roled after serving 13 months at
Ft. Leavenworth, Kan.
The Army could have carried
the mutiny case to the Court of

a id others
Military Appeal, the highest
court in the military judicial
system.
Halvonik said at least three
of the other mutiny conviction
appeals have been argued be-
fore the Court of Military Re-
view and decisions soon should
be handed down.
Two appeals involve Pvts.
Louis S. Osczepinski, 22, of Flor-
ida, N.Y., originally sentenced
to 16 years, and Lawrence W.
Reidel, 21 of Medford, Ore.,
given a 14-year term.
The stiff sentences for the
first three men convicted stir-
red protest in Congress and
brought appointment of a civil-
ian committee to investigate
the Presidio Stockade.
The committee last Monday
recommended to Secretary of
the Army Stanley Resor that
the prison be closed. It called.
the stockade unsafe and antiqu-
ated.

COLUMBIA, Me. ( )-"I wish
this letter were bringing you
good news concerning your ap-
plication for admission to col-
lege . . . -Unfortunately I must
notify you that we cannot ad-
mit you at this time."
This form letter went to 500
high school graduates who
wanted to attend the St Louis
campus of the University of
Missouri. Similar letters by the
tens of thousands have gone
from other big state universities
and colleges to qualified stu-
dents.
All the letters carry a be-
tween-the-lines message: The
baby boom of the early 1950s
has reached college age and the
crunch is on for a classroom
seat.
State legislatures, reacting"to
student disorders, are tighten-
ing purse strings._
And the Nixon administration
proposals for changes in federal
BACH CLUB
presents a performance of
TWO ARIAS
from Bach's
Christmas Oratorio
Abbie Van De Walker, voice
Donna Ash, piono
Linda Speck, violin
Also, a short talk by Linda Speck
Refreshments & FUN afterwards!
THUR., June 18, 8 P.M.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 MAYNARD
EVERYONE WELCOME!
(no musical knowledge needed)
Great way to meet
interestina people.
663-2827, 761-6981

aid have the educational asso-
ciations in near panic.
While H. E. Mueller, director
of admissions at St. Louis, had
to mail condolence letters to 500
students. Federal City College
in Washington, D.C., had no
notify 16,000 . . . Penn State
10,400 . . . State University of
Buffalo 6,150 . . .University of
Massachusetts 5,000.
And the University's literary
college turned away over 400
"qualified" in-state students for
this coming fall.
1968 was the first year this
University unit was faced with
surplus qualified in-state appli-
cations. The problem was more
or less resolved when the extra
students were offered admission
to summer and winter terms, or
w e r e encouraged to apply to
Flint or Dearborn. Half of the
-300 accepted the provisional
conditions.
Last year, 400 surplus in-stat-
ers were offered similar options,
and this year, even more are
being asked to take alternatives
to fall admission, or are being
turned away for lack of space,
even though they are told they
are qualified.
The possibility of rising ad-
mission standards to alleviate
the problem has been suggested,
but admission officials call that
solution unrealistic. Currently,
they say, the University has ad-
missions standards as high as
any public university in t h e
country, for in-state as well as
out-of-state students.
The National Association of
State Universities and Land
Grant Colleges reports that 35
of its 101 members-the biggest
schools in the land-had reject-
ed 87.230 qualified freshmen
Itwho wanted to enroll this fall.

These are the schools that of-
fer the broadest educational op-
portunities for the least money.
They award 30 per cent of all
four-year and first professional
degress, 40 per cent of all master
degrees and 60 per cent of the
doctorates.
A state universities association
spokesman said major reasons
cited for the rejections were
classroom shortage, inadequate
facilities and housing shortages.
Mueller's letter, for example,
told the students, "No doubt
you have heard or read ... that
the University of Missouri-St.
Louis must limit enrollment ...
Our physical facilities are ex-
tremely limited and no funds are
forthcoming for expanding our
program."
Missouri - with campuses in

opportunities are limited. Costs
can be high, too.
Tuition costs at junior or
community colleges vary wide-
ly. Some states, like California,
charge no tuition. Nationwide,
the average charge is about $300
annually, but few of these
schools offer student housing.
All of this is, of course, if you
can get in.
At the St. Louis campus, said
university president John Weav-
er, "We just don't have another
seat. When we will reach the
saturation point on the other
campuses I just don't know, but
already we are at the saturation
point in some of the disciplines."
Weaver and his staff of vice
presidents also said in interviews
they don't know when te
crunch will be relieved.

"We just don't have another seat. When we
will reach the saturation point at other cam-
puses I just don't know, but already we are
at the saturation point in some of the disci-
plines."

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETINM
#Ne5~il~ilmNENN~il148N~eiimiesNPRESENTS
Thursday, June 18 BOB SH EFF
General Notices and his Real Great Band
Summer Commencement Exercises: Frdy~Stra or pna
Aug. 9, 1970, 2:00 p.m., Hill Aud. All Friday & Saturday doors open at 8 p.m.
graduates of 1970 spring-summer term $i.00 665-0606
may attend. 'n665ge606
(Continued on Page 9)

Eves
6:25, 9:05

i, FW A "W4
"Perfctio tot oder BoainaZ

Matinees
1:00, 3:40

Columbia, Rolla, St. Louis and
Kansas City and a total enroll-
ment of 45,000 is a typical state
university. Its problems-from
student financial aid to build-
ing new facilities-are, to a
degree, what most university
presidents face today.
'And what happened to one of
the students it rejected is typi-
cal, too.
Richard Streibel of St. Louis,
who wants to be a lawyer, has
enrolled in a neighborhood com-
munity college. An above-av-
erage student whose father owns
and operates a kennel, Streibel
said his financial planning had
envisioned attending a school.
where he could live at home.
Attending a private or out-of-
state school was not financially
possible, he said.
Streibel could have applied to
one of the prestigious private
universities. But the "bench-
mark cost for attending" these
schools-such as those in the
Ivy League, Stanford in the
West and Duke in the South-
runs about $4,000 a year, ac-
cording to the Association of
American Universities.
Another alternative w o u l d
have been a small .liberal arts
college or junior college. But at
some of these colleges, academic

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A ROSS HUNTER Production
iC AML aII
BURT LANCASTER 'DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG JACQUELINE BISSET - GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN- MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON- LLOYD NOLAN 4""I" RSMP T R.(C TCOLOr
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Matinees Monday thru Saturday $1.75 -

Last year, the state appro-
priated $80.7 million of the Lni-
versity' $121.7 million budget.
The univerity said to "stay
even" in 1970 it needed $103.5
million from the state. The gov-
ernor, however, has recommend-
ed no increase.
In addition, Missouri has no
new money committed by the
state for construction. And with
federal construction funds dry-
ing up, the school's building
fund will be empty when struc-
tures now being built are com-
pleted.
Dale Bowling, vice president
for business management, said
about three year's lead time is
needed to get a building ready
for classes. This means, he said,
that Missouri will be without
expandtd facilities until at least
1974 or 1975.
Already, Missouri professors
have been shunted to old uni-
versity-owned residences for of-
fice space, andinsomenbuild-
ings hallways have been con-
verted into classrooms.
In the past, federal assistance
meant from one-third to one-
half more space for every state
or university dollar spent, ac-
cording to Ray Bozoni, vice pres-
-ident for finance at St. Louis.
President Nixon didn't discuss
e college construction in his
March higher education message
to Congress. He called for a
$250 million increase to $5,285
billion in higher education
Sspending, and proposed legisla-
tion to "expand and revamp
student aid so that it places
more emphasis on helping low-
income students than it does to-
day."
In describing past federal
spending as "disjointed, ill-di-
rected and without coherent
long-range plan," Nixon said:
"Something is basically unequal
about opporunity for higher ed-
ucation when a young person
whose family earns more than
$15,000 a year is nine times more
likely to attend colleges than a
young person whose family
earns less than $3,000."
But educators disagree that

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